Cases reported "Tularemia"

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1/9. tularemia: a case transmitted from a sheep.

    tularemia is an arthropod-borne infectious disease caused by francisella tularensis, a gram-negative microorganism that normally resides in a wide range of wild and domestic animals. The disease is characterized by a sudden onset with high fever, headache, malaise, chills, myalgia, and arthralgia. A short time after exposure, an inflamed and ulcerated lesion rapidly appears at the site of entry. A regional lymphadenopathy follows the cutaneous presentation.Cultures from the lesions or blood generally give negative results. Histopathologic examination reveals either a nonspecific inflammatory infiltrate or an infectious granuloma. The most useful laboratory procedure in the diagnosis of tularemia is serologic tests. streptomycin, gentamicin, and tetracycline are the drugs of choice in the treatment. quinolones are also effective. tularemia is fairly rare in turkey. We present a typical case of ulceroglandular tularemia transmitted from a sheep to a young man.
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2/9. Report on five cases of tularaemic pneumonia in a tularaemia outbreak in spain.

    A report is given on five cases of atypical tularaemic pneumonia selected from among 140 cases of tularaemic infection in a previously reported outbreak occurring in 1997. Prior to this outbreak no human cases of tularaemia had been reported in spain. All cases were diagnosed serologically. All five patients reported on here had a mild form of the disease, which was treated successfully with streptomycin in four cases and ciprofloxacin in one case. Tularaemic pneumonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical pneumonia in spain, especially in hunters and other persons who handle animal carcasses.
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3/9. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome attributable to an encounter with a wild rabbit.

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical and histopathologic findings in a patient with Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome attributable to francisella tularensis obtained from an encounter with a wild baby rabbit. methods: In an 18-year-old man, the clinical course, laboratory findings, and histopathologic findings are described. RESULTS: Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with unilateral granulomatous conjunctivitis, painful preauricular, and submandibular lymphadenopathy combined with systemic symptoms of general malaise and fever. CONCLUSION: tularemia is one etiology of Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome. It is caused by francisella tularensis and is usually transmitted to humans via infected animal blood or through an insect bite, most often a tick. For treatment, intramuscular streptomycin is the drug of choice.
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4/9. tularemia--oklahoma, 2000.

    In June 2000, seven cases of tularemia were reported to the oklahoma State Department of health (OSDH) over an 18-day period. Enhanced tularemia surveillance by OSDH during July-September 2000 detected four additional cases. During 1995-1999, an average of six cases were reported each year. This report summarizes clinical and epidemiologic information from the investigation of the 11 cases, presents three case reports to illustrate different risk factors for tularemia, and underscores the danger of delayed diagnosis of tularemia and the risk for acquiring tularemia in laboratory settings. physicians should consider tularemia in ill persons with fever who reside in or visit areas where the disease is endemic and who have been exposed to ticks or carcasses or tissue from rabbits or other animals.
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5/9. tularemia of the head and neck: a possible sign of bioterrorism.

    Recent bioterror attacks and other world events have focused the medical community's attention on agents that might be used in biological warfare. One of these potential biological weapons is francisella tularensis, a gramnegative coccobacillus that is one of the most infectious bacteria known. F tularensis can cause severe, even fatal, systemic tularemia. Under normal circumstances, F tularensis is transmitted by infected ticks, insects, and other animals. As a weapon of terrorism, the bacterium would likely be disseminated as an aerosol and contracted by inhalation. Because many cases of tularemia are characterized by head and neck symptoms, otolaryngologists should be familiar with the diagnosis and management of this disease. In this article, we describe a case of zoonotic tularemia that manifested as a neck mass, and we review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of tularemia. We also summarize what is known about its potential as a biological weapon.
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6/9. Characterization of a novicida-like subspecies of francisella tularensis isolated in australia.

    francisella tularensis is found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, where it is associated with the disease of tularaemia in animals and humans. The isolation and identification is reported of a novicida-like subspecies of F. tularensis from a foot wound sustained in brackish water in the northern territory of australia.
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7/9. A family outbreak of tularemia.

    A family cluster of tularemia is described. In a family of three members different clinical type of the disease occurred after having been exposed to a sick wild hare. From the hare kidney francisella tularensis type 1 was isolated. Pneumonic, typhoid-like tularemia occurred in the father who inhaled hare skin hairs and an ulceroglandular form in the mother and in the child who had direct contact with the animal.
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8/9. Cavitary pneumonia associated with tularemia.

    A wide range of microorganisms has been associated with cavitary pneumonia and pulmonary abscess. We present a case of serologically documented tularemia in an animal-hide handler who demonstrated multiple pulmonary infiltrates with cavitation. Inclusion of tularemia in the differential diagnosis of cavitary pneumonia in patients with exposure to animals is emphasized.
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9/9. Case report. tularemia in ohio: report of two cases and clinical review.

    Although unusual, human tularemia continues to be reported from areas of the united states which are not heavily endemic for the disease. Two patients with ulceroglandular tularemia diagnosed in ohio are described. The causative microorganism, francisella tularensis, is a small, pleomorphic gram negative coccobacillus which requires special microbiological media for laboratory isolation. In nature, the organism is usually transmitted to man by the handling of infected animal tissues and body fluids or by an arthropod vector. There are several clinical forms of tularemia of which the ulceroglandular type is most common. Laboratory diagnosis is usually made by demonstrating a four-fold increase in the serologic agglutinating antibody titer to francisella tularensis. streptomycin is the drug of choice in the treatment of tularemia.
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