Cases reported "Tularemia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/10. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome attributable to an encounter with a wild rabbit.

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical and histopathologic findings in a patient with Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome attributable to francisella tularensis obtained from an encounter with a wild baby rabbit. methods: In an 18-year-old man, the clinical course, laboratory findings, and histopathologic findings are described. RESULTS: Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with unilateral granulomatous conjunctivitis, painful preauricular, and submandibular lymphadenopathy combined with systemic symptoms of general malaise and fever. CONCLUSION: tularemia is one etiology of Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome. It is caused by francisella tularensis and is usually transmitted to humans via infected animal blood or through an insect bite, most often a tick. For treatment, intramuscular streptomycin is the drug of choice.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/10. tularemia--oklahoma, 2000.

    In June 2000, seven cases of tularemia were reported to the oklahoma State Department of health (OSDH) over an 18-day period. Enhanced tularemia surveillance by OSDH during July-September 2000 detected four additional cases. During 1995-1999, an average of six cases were reported each year. This report summarizes clinical and epidemiologic information from the investigation of the 11 cases, presents three case reports to illustrate different risk factors for tularemia, and underscores the danger of delayed diagnosis of tularemia and the risk for acquiring tularemia in laboratory settings. physicians should consider tularemia in ill persons with fever who reside in or visit areas where the disease is endemic and who have been exposed to ticks or carcasses or tissue from rabbits or other animals.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/10. Dual infection: tularemia and Lyme borreliosis acquired by single tick bite in northwest croatia.

    A case of dual infection, tularemia and Lyme borreliosis acquired by a single tick bite in northwest croatia is presented. The patient came from a highly endemic region for Lyme borreliosis, where 45% of the ticks are infected with borrelia burgdorferi. Clinically, tularemia manifested as the ulceroglandular form, and Lyme borreliosis manifested with arthritis (knee). Both diseases responded well to combined antibiotic therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/10. tularemia of the head and neck: a possible sign of bioterrorism.

    Recent bioterror attacks and other world events have focused the medical community's attention on agents that might be used in biological warfare. One of these potential biological weapons is francisella tularensis, a gramnegative coccobacillus that is one of the most infectious bacteria known. F tularensis can cause severe, even fatal, systemic tularemia. Under normal circumstances, F tularensis is transmitted by infected ticks, insects, and other animals. As a weapon of terrorism, the bacterium would likely be disseminated as an aerosol and contracted by inhalation. Because many cases of tularemia are characterized by head and neck symptoms, otolaryngologists should be familiar with the diagnosis and management of this disease. In this article, we describe a case of zoonotic tularemia that manifested as a neck mass, and we review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of tularemia. We also summarize what is known about its potential as a biological weapon.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/10. Response of tularemic meningitis to antimicrobial therapy.

    A 60-year-old man had pyogenic meningitis due to francisella tularensis acquired by tick bite. His disease initially improved but later relapsed after a standard course of streptomycin. Complete resolution resulted from prolonged combined therapy with streptomycin and tetracycline. Successful treatment of acute tularemic meningitis has not previously been reported. Our experience suggests that therapy should include agents that reliably penetrate the CSF, that is, tetracycline or chloramphenicol, for optimal treatment of this rare form of tularemia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/10. Oculoglandular syndrome caused by francisella tularensis.

    Oculoglandular syndrome developed in a 9-year-old boy with a recent history of tick bites and minor eye trauma. francisella tularensis was isolated on chemically supplemented chocolate agar from a swab of a conjunctival ulcer and an aspirate of a preauricular lymph node, confirming the diagnosis of tularemia. In addition, a rise in agglutination titer to the pathogen was detected in paired sera. The differential diagnosis of oculoglandular syndrome is discussed, with emphasis on the clinical characteristics which led to the diagnosis of tularemia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/10. Tick-borne tularemia presenting as ulcerative lymphadenitis.

    In a patient with suppurative lymphadenitis who fails to respond to antibiotics routinely used for pyogenic adenitis, the diagnosis of tularemia should be considered if there is good evidence for recent tick or other insect exposure. A trial of streptomycin therapy may be indicated, pending culture and serology results, in any patient whose signs and symptoms strongly suggest this diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/10. tularemia: review of eight cases of tick-borne infection and the epidemiology of the disease in georgia.

    In the period 1960 to 1979, 177 cases of tularemia occurred in residents of georgia. A tick bite was the implicated source of exposure in eight cases (4.5%), whereas 91 cases (51.4%) were associated with direct contact with infected rabbits. In georgia and other southeastern states, the epidemiology of human tularemia infection primarily involves rabbits. However, a diagnosis of tularemia should still be considered in this region in a febrile patient with or without a primary lesion or reported exposure to rabbits. A history of having been bitten by a tick may be the major clue in determining the diagnosis. A primary ulcerative lesion on the legs or in concealed body areas such as the axillary or intergluteal regions, is commonly the presenting sign in the patient with tick-borne tularemia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/10. Tickborne oculoglandular tularemia: case report and review of seasonal and vectorial associations in 106 cases.

    A patient acquired tickborne oculoglandular tularemia in early summer in rural virginia. Tick exposure may be a clue to the diagnosis of tularemia in the eastern as well as the western united states, especially in summer months. A review of the experience with tularemia in virginia for the last 13 years shows a bimodal seasonal incidence of tularemia with an associated vector exposure in 77.4% of 106 cases. The majority of cases occurring during winter months have been associated with rabbit exposure, while those in summer months are often associated with tick exposure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/10. Isolation of francisella tularensis by centrifugation of shell vial cell culture from an inoculation eschar.

    A 52-year-old man was admitted to the hospital following the development of an inoculation eschar and fever six days after being bitten by a tick. He was clinically diagnosed as suffering from rickettsiosis. Eschar biopsy cultures on standard bacteriological media remained sterile. However, inoculation of cells with the homogenized specimen by the centrifugation-shell vial technique (M. Marrero and D. Raoult, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 40:197-199, 1989) resulted in the recovery of a bacterium. Determination of the sequence of the 16S rRNA gene amplified from the organism and comparison of the sequence to other sequences identified it as a strain of francisella tularensis, whereas the specific serology was still negative. Our findings demonstrate that the centrifugation-cell culture, which is a tool for investigation of tick-transmitted diseases, may have the potential to serve as a method for the cultural isolation of F. tularensis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Tularemia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.