Cases reported "Tumor Virus Infections"

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1/9. Human papillomavirus type 1-associated squamous cell carcinoma in a heart transplant recipient.

    The occurrence of squamous cell carcinomas in organ transplant recipients with warts represents a good model to study viral carcinogenesis. Most of the cases were reported in renal transplant recipients. We present the case of a heart transplant recipient in whom multiple common warts, preepitheliomatous keratoses, and squamous cell carcinomas developed. The warts began 4 years after the transplantation and the first carcinoma occurred 2 years after the warts, all the lesions being on sun-exposed areas. Histologic signs of human papillomavirus infection were seen in all premalignant and malignant lesions. Furthermore, human papillomavirus type 1 dna was detected by in situ molecular hybridization within one of the carcinomas. Human papillomaviruses, along with other carcinogenic factors, play an important role in the development of carcinomas, and benign types could be implicated. Further studies are required to evaluate the frequency of cutaneous malignant neoplasms in heart transplant recipients as compared with renal transplant recipients.
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keywords = carcinogenesis
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2/9. Squamous cell papilloma of the esophagus: a tumour probably caused by human papilloma virus (HPV).

    The third well-documented case of an oesophageal squamous cell papilloma in the literature is studied by light microscopy and using an indirect immunoperoxidase-PAP technique. Human papilloma virus (HPV) antigens were found within the nuclei of the superficial dyskeratotic cells and of koilocytes, both of which are characteristic cells found in HPV lesions elsewhere in the body. The findings are discussed in the light of current concepts of HPV lesions in general. It is suggested that this tumour is potentially malignant and that the possible role of HPV in human oesophageal carcinogenesis deserves further study.
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keywords = carcinogenesis
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3/9. Demonstration of human papilloma virus (HPV) antigens in a case of urethral condyloma.

    A 33-year-old women is reported, in whom a urethral condyloma was found 2 years after a preceding condylomatous lesion in the uterine cervix. The urethral condyloma was of the flat type, not previously described in this location, and it was found by an indirect immunoperoxidase-PAP method to contain cells positive for human papilloma virus (HPV) antigens. The role of HPV in the etiology of such condylomas is briefly reviewed and the suggested involvement of HPV in human squamous cell carcinogenesis is discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
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4/9. Human papillomavirus and widespread cutaneous carcinoma after PUVA photochemotherapy.

    BACKGROUND: Oral psoralen with UV-A (PUVA) photochemotherapy is known to cause cutaneous malignancies and has been associated with cutaneous immunosuppression. Human papillomavirus infection has also been associated with cutaneous malignancies and with immunosuppressed individuals. We therefore sought evidence of human papillomavirus infection in a patient with a long history of puva therapy and multiple cutaneous malignancies. OBSERVATIONS: During a 15-year period, an otherwise healthy patient with psoriasis who had undergone a 10-year course of PUVA photochemotherapy developed 13 squamous cell carcinomas, eight lesions diagnosed as "squamous cell carcinoma vs keratoacanthoma," 14 other keratoacanthomas, six basal cell carcinomas, one melanoma in situ, and 18 other keratinocytic dysplasias. Twenty-two of the 30 lesions tested for human papillomavirus dna by polymerase chain reaction were positive for type 16/18, including six of the seven basal or squamous cell carcinomas tested. CONCLUSION: We hypothesize that puva therapy-induced immunosuppression may play an important role in PUVA-related carcinogenesis by affecting the extent and pathogenicity of human papillomavirus infection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
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5/9. Multiple metachronous skin squamous cell carcinomas and epidermodysplasia verruciformis in the head region: a human papilloma virus-associated disease.

    Data from a young adult man with epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) and multiple metachronous spinaliomas in the head and neck region are presented. diagnosis of this rare, human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated disease was based on: (1) Typical skin lesions, including viral warts, verruca plana-type lesions and pityriasis versicilor; (2) typical histological features, including "foamy giant keratinocytes"; (3) evidence of HPV 5, 8 and 20 in pityriasis versicilor-like lesions; (4) a cellular immunodeficiency due to a relative T-helper-cell deficit. No specific treatment of EV is known, so that therapy concentrates on early removal of spinaliomas and treatment of intercurrent infections. Since EV patients have numerous benign skin lesions and frequently develop metastatic and non-metastatic carcinomas, molecular changes of HPV during carcinogenesis can be studied.
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ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
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6/9. Involvement of human papillomavirus type 20 in epidermodysplasia verruciformis skin carcinogenesis.

    The involvement of human papillomavirus (HPV) in skin carcinogenesis in a patient with epidermodysplasia verruciformis was studied. This patient had disseminated pityriasis versicolor-like lesions, flat warts, and a malignant skin carcinoma. HPV types 3, 17, 20 (HPV-20), and 38 were isolated and molecularly cloned from the benign skin lesions of this patient. Of these HPVs, only HPV-20 was detected in the malignant skin carcinoma. Transcripts of HPV-20 were also expressed in the carcinoma. These findings suggest that HPV-20 was involved in the skin carcinogenesis in this patient.
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ranking = 6
keywords = carcinogenesis
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7/9. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses are rarely associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder: evaluation by differential polymerase chain reaction.

    While a strong association between oncogenic human papillomaviruses and squamous cell cancers of the genital tract (penis, urethra and cervix) is known to exist, there is substantial controversy regarding the association of human papillomaviruses and cancers of the bladder. Technical issues regarding assay technique and concern about potential contamination have marred interpretation of previous work. Moreover, because human papillomavirus has been associated predominantly with squamous cell cancers at other sites, any involvement of human papillomavirus and bladder epithelial carcinogenesis must address whether any association between human papillomavirus and squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder exists. Differential polymerase chain reaction and a rigorous protocol to avoid crossover contamination were used to analyze archival bladder carcinoma specimens (22 squamous cell carcinomas and 20 transitional cell carcinomas). Type specific primers for human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 were used as were general primers to detect types 6b, 11, 13, 16, 18, 31, 32, 33, 35, 45 and 51. Only 1 of 22 squamous cell carcinoma specimens (4.4%) was positive (human papillomavirus type 18)--a cadaveric renal transplant patient on chronic immunosuppression. Cervical specimens were human papillomavirus negative in this patient. No human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid was detected in the 20 transitional cell carcinoma cohort. Our results confirm that these human papillomavirus types appear to have little association with invasive transitional cell cancers. Of greater significance, despite this (to our knowledge) first reported case of human papillomavirus type 18 detected in squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder (seen in an immunocompromised patient), we conclude that these oncogenic human papillomavirus types do not have a significant role in squamous cell carcinogenesis of the bladder.
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ranking = 2
keywords = carcinogenesis
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8/9. Development of human papillomavirus-associated Buschke-Lowenstein penile carcinoma during cyclosporine therapy for generalized pustular psoriasis.

    Buschke-Lowenstein-type giant penile condyloma developed in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative, 25-year-old man after 4 years of intermittent cyclosporine therapy (5 mg/kg/day) for pustular psoriasis. Microscopic examination showed multifocal areas of invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Dot blot analysis of amplified polymerase chain reaction products with primers directed at the L1 region demonstrated signals for several human papillomavirus genotypes, including human papillomavirus type 16, that correlated with different histologic patterns consisting of verrucous and bowenoid changes and invasive carcinoma. This case conforms to the enhanced risk of cutaneous carcinogenesis from either papillomavirus infection or chronic actinic damage that has become evident in patients with organ allografts and cyclosporine therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
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9/9. Synchronous and metachronous multicentric squamous cell carcinomas in the upper aerodigestive tract.

    A rare case is presented of a 57-year-old Japanese male with synchronous and metachronous multicentric squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in the upper aerodigestive tract. During a 9-year-period from the appearance of first primary SCC to autopsy, 14 foci of primary SCC and one severe dysplasia developed in succession in the thoracic esophagus, oral floor, soft palate, uvula, lingual radix, piriform recess, hypopharynx, cervical esophagus, trachea and lingual body. The patient died of severe bronchopneumonia due to Gram-negative bacterial infection that developed as a result of recurrent nerve paralysis. Human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus, which are risk factors, were not detected by immunohistochemistry or by the polymerase chain reaction method. Genetic analysis revealed the absence of point mutations in K-ras codon 12. Heavy consumption of alcohol and excessive smoking may have been responsible for the multicentric carcinogenesis. This is the first case report in the literature of the development of so many primary SCC lesions in the upper aerodigestive tract during such a short period.
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ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
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