Cases reported "Ulcer"

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1/44. Esophageal ulcer and alendronate.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of esophageal ulcer associated with the use of alendronate. CASE REPORT: This is the fifth case ever described in the literature according to our bibliographic review. In our patient, the association between the drug and the esophageal lesions was masked by the presence of a hiatal hernia, potentially a cause of the esophageal lesion. The persistence of the lesions despite high doses of anti-reflux therapy called attention to the possibility of the relationship. The esophageal lesion healed soon after suspension of alendronate. DISCUSSION: The authors present a review of the literature and point to the need for diagnostic investigation, to suspend such a drug from patients who experience dyspeptic symptoms while using it.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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2/44. Crohn's disease of the esophagus: report of a case.

    We report herein the case of a 27-year-old man with Crohn's disease of the esophagus. The patient presented with large ulcers in the esophagus for which treatment based on a diagnosis of reflux esophagitis was commenced. Although his symptoms were initially resolved, the ulcers did not improve and he was readmitted to hospital 3 months later for progressive heartburn. An esophagoscopy revealed large ulcers in the esophagus, and a colonoscopy revealed a longitudinal ulcer in the terminal ileum. Histological examination of specimens from the terminal ileum showed severe inflammation without granuloma formation, which led to a diagnosis of Crohn's disease. The oral administration of prednisolone and salazosulfapyridine controlled his symptoms and the esophageal ulcers were observed to be healing 2 weeks after this treatment was initiated. A review of the English literature revealed only 77 cases of this disease. Isolated esophageal lesions were reported in ten patients (13.0%), none of which were able to be diagnosed as Crohn's disease preoperatively. Ileocolic lesions developed after esophageal lesions in only five patients (6.5%) including ours. In the remaining 62 patients (80.5%), ileocolic lesions had existed synchronous with or prior to the esophageal lesions. This suggests that ileocolic lesions may often coexist in Crohn's patients with esophageal lesions, and that examination of the terminal ileum must be performed to confirm a diagnosis of Crohn's disease of the esophagus.
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ranking = 994.83685353823
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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3/44. doxycycline-induced esophageal ulceration in the U.S. Military service.

    U.S. military forces are frequently deployed with little warning to regions of the world where chloroquine-resistant malaria is endemic. doxycycline is often used for malaria chemoprophylaxis in these environments. The use of doxycycline can be complicated by esophageal injury. Two cases of esophageal ulceration will be discussed, followed by a review of the literature. doxycycline causes esophageal injury through a combination of drug-specific factors, the circumstances of drug administration, and individual patient conditions. patients with dysphagia attributable to esophageal ulceration are managed by intravenous fluid support and control of gastric acid reflux until their symptoms resolve over 5 to 7 days. The risk of esophageal injury can be minimized by use of fresh capsules, drug administration in the upright position well before lying down to sleep, and drinking at least 100 ml of water after swallowing the medication.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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4/44. Case of ulcerative colitis associated with oesophageal ulcer.

    A case of ulcerative colitis complicated by oesophageal ulcers is reported. A woman was admitted to our hospital because of exacerbations of ulcerative colitis both in 1992 (aged 15 years) and 1995 (aged 18 years). When she was admitted in 1995 she complained of bloody diarrhoea, sore throat and pain on swallowing. Oesophagogastro-duodenoscopy revealed oesophageal ulcers. Oesophageal pH monitoring (24-h) showed no evidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. After the patient was treated she with oral prednisolone showed considerable improvement clinically and endoscopically. Initial dosage was 60 mg/day, and 1 week later, the dosage was gradually dropped since the patient responded favourably. The improvement of the oesophageal lesions coincided with the remission of ulcerative colitis. The oesophageal ulcers are, therefore, thought to be an extracolonic manifestation of ulcerative colitis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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5/44. Esophagobronchial fistula combined with a peptic esophageal stenosis.

    Peptic strictures are a rare complication of severe gastroesophageal reflux disease. An esophagobronchial fistula as a complication of a severe long-term reflux esophagitis with peptic stenosis is here described for the first time: A 43-year-old mentally disabled patient suffered from recurrent bronchopneumonia. endoscopy revealed an esophagobronchial fistula originating in a peptic stricture. Under short-term fasting, intravenous feeding and application of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) closure of this fistula was achieved within 4 days. Subsequently, dilatation was carried out. The case demonstrates that pulmonary complications in patients with peptic esophageal strictures may not only be due to aspiration of refluxate but--rarely--also to fistulae between the esophagus and the bronchial tree.
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ranking = 996.83685353823
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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6/44. Emergency laparoscopic treatment for acute massive bleeding of an esophageal ulcer.

    Laparoscopic fundoplication is now considered the treatment of choice for the management of severe gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its complications. The laparoscopic approach achieves the same good results as open surgery in elective surgery for GERD; it also has all the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Today, laparoscopy plays also a significant role in a great variety of emergency abdominal situations and acute abdominal pain. A 30-year-old man was admitted to our center due to an upper gastrointestinal bleed caused by a esophageal ulcer over a Barrett's esophagus located in lower third of the esophagus. Two therapeutic esophagogastroscopies were done in 24 h, but urgent surgical intervention was indicated because of recurrent transfusion-demanding bleeding. A combined laparoscopic-endoscopic approach was followed. Surgery began with a complete hiatal dissection, including the distal third of the esophagus, diaphragmatic crus, and wide retrogastric window. Intraoperative flexible esophagoscopy revealed an active ulcer bleeding on the right anterior quadrant in the lower esophagus. Two transfixive stitches were applied through the wall of the esophagus at the site indicated by the light of the flexible endoscope, and complete hemostasis was achieved. Finally, employing the anterior wall of the fundus, a short Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication was performed. The operating time was 140 min. There were no complications and there has been no recurrence of the bleeding.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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7/44. doxycycline-induced pill esophagitis.

    Pill-induced esophagitis is a complication seen in patients who use certain medications such as tetracycline and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In this short report, we described five cases of doxycycline-induced esophagitis with endoscopic images. All of the patients were young or middle-aged women. Dysphagia or odynophagia with retrosternal pain were the main presenting symptoms in all cases. The observed injuries were at the middle third of esophagus with a normal surrounding mucosa. All patients had a history of swallowing the capsule with a small amount of water or in a recumbent position. Two patients with dysphagia were managed by intravenous fluid support and parenteral acid suppression. The symptoms were improved in 2-7 days after the ceasing of the drug and control endoscopies were completely normal in all cases after 3-4 weeks of admission. The drug-induced esophagitis is not rare with certain drugs and should be suspected in all patients presenting with chest pain and dysphagia. physicians must warn the patients to take the pills and capsules with enough liquid and in the upright position.
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ranking = 6956.8579747676
keywords = esophagitis
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8/44. cyproterone acetate and ethinylestradiol-induced pill oesophagitis: a case report.

    Although there are many cases of oesophagitis related to pill in medical literature, there are only a few reports concerning oesophagitis related to oral contraceptives, and none about cyproterone acetate and ethinylestradiol combination (Diane-35). In this report, we describe a female patient who suffered from odynophagia and retrosternal pain after taking Diane-35 for hirsutism. The endoscopic examination revealed two well-demarcated circumferential ulcers of 1 cm diameter surrounded by relatively normal mucosa in mid-oesophagus. The patient had gone to bed immediately after taking the pill. Oral intake was stopped, and intravenous fluids and omeprazole were administered as part of treatment. The patient benefited from this approach very quickly and was discharged from hospital in 5 days. The oesophagus was completely normal in control endoscopy after 2 months. Diane-35 should be added to the list of drugs causing pill oesophagitis, and physicians should inform the patients that the pills should be taken with enough water and they should not lie down right after ingesting the pills.
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ranking = 6956.8579747676
keywords = esophagitis
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9/44. actinomycosis esophagitis in a patient with persistent dysphagia.

    Many causes of esophagitis exist in immunocompromised patients. Uncommon pathogens must be considered to facilitate timely and appropriate therapy. A limited number of cases of esophageal actinomycosis have been reported. This report describes an unusual case of esophageal actinomycosis in a patient with persistent dysphagia. The broad differential may have delayed definitive diagnosis in the case study patient. biopsy and culture are essential for accurate diagnosis. Although actinomycosis is a rare disease, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with oral or esophageal complaints. It may also be considered as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients. The treatment of choice is parenteral penicillin g, 18 to 24 million units for 2 to 6 weeks followed by oral therapy for 6-12 months.
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ranking = 4969.1842676911
keywords = esophagitis
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10/44. Actinomycotic infection of the oesophagus.

    Actinomycotic infections involving the oesophagus are uncommon but have been reported in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of actinomycosis oesophagitis in a patient with lung cancer who received chemo- and radiotherapy. This patient was admitted with severe dysphagia and odynophagia and biopsy from an oesophageal ulcer found on oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed actinomycosis. The patient was treated with intravenous penicillin g followed by ceftriaxone with clinical improvement and repeat EGD showed reduction in the size of the oesophageal ulcer, but he relapsed due to non-compliance. We review the English literature regarding the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of actinomycotic infections of the oesophagus.
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ranking = 993.83685353823
keywords = esophagitis
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