Cases reported "Ulna Fractures"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/98. An open fracture of the ulna with bone loss, treated by bone transport.

    We report a Gustilo and Anderson IIIc fracture of the ulna with 8 cm of bone loss which was reconstructed primarily by the technique of external fixation and bone transport. Five operations were performed over a period of 14 months (treatment index = 52.5 days/cm). A satisfactory functional result was achieved, demonstrating the efficacy of this technique for difficult forearm reconstructions and comparing favourably with other methods of managing large bone and soft tissue defects.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/98. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the forearm treated by free vascularized fibular graft: a report of three cases and a review of the literature.

    Congenital pseudarthrosis of the forearm is a rare condition; approximately 60 cases have been reported in the English literature. We report 3 patients treated by wide excision of the pseudarthrosis and free vascularized fibular grafting. The pseudarthrosis involved the radius in 1 patient and the ulna in 2. Neurofibromatosis was present in 2 patients. The technical problems encountered during the procedures included preservation of the distal epiphysis and attaining stable fixation of the fibular graft without damaging its vascular supply. A review of 15 previously reported patients treated by free vascularized fibular grafting showed that this procedure is excellent in the treatment of congenital pseudarthrosis of the forearm and that the result is consistently reproducible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/98. Entrapment of the median nerve in a greenstick forearm fracture. A case report and review of the literature.

    We report a case of low median nerve palsy occurring as a complication of a closed both-bone forearm fracture in a child. Following delayed diagnosis, surgical exploration was performed and it was observed that the median nerve was entrapped in the callus of the radius fracture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/98. A new fracture of the forearm adjacent to a healing fracture.

    A 10-year-old girl sustained closed fractures of the distal radius and ulna. This was manipulated and she was treated in an above-elbow plaster for 4 weeks. Two weeks later she was discharged, only to have a second injury to the same forearm. X-ray showed a new fracture distal to undisrupted callus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/98. Entrapment of the index flexor digitorum profundus tendon after fracture of both forearm bones in a child.

    Entrapment of the index FDP tendon in a radius fracture callus occurred after fracture of both forearm bones in a 4-year-old boy. Surgical release of the FDP tendon, three months after fracture, resulted in normal index finger motion. This clinical problem can be avoided by a detailed physical examination of children with forearm fractures, verifying full passive range-of-motion of the hand after cast immobilization. Prompt supervised active range-of-motion should be done to prevent adhesions at the fracture site.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/98. Metallosis mimicking osteomyelitis from a forearm plate retained for 50 years.

    A forearm plate retained for 50 years was removed because an acute inflammation mimicked chronic infection. The radiographs were very confusing. During the operation metallosis was obvious. Despite the general opinion that forearm plates should be kept in place, this probably should not apply to old "historical" hardware of uncertain chemical composition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/98. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the ulna and radius in two cases of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Two children with neurofibromatosis type 1 who presented at birth with congenital pseudarthrosis of the ulna and radius are described. The patients were treated with broad resections. As a consequence, the forearms were reduced in length. The osteotomies were stabilized in one patient first with endomedullary nailing and then with a free vascularized fibular graft. In the second patient the osteotomy was stabilized by external fixation. Using these techniques, rapid and excellent healing and normal function were achieved. In contrast to the lower extremity, reduction of the length of the forearm can be accepted to a certain extent. If necessary, an extension osteotomy can be performed at a later date.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/98. One-bone forearm formation using vascularized fibula graft for massive bone defect of the forearm with infection: case report.

    Massive long-bone defects of greater than 6 cm are difficult to treat with conventional bone grafts, and other methods are sometimes recommended, such as vascularized bone grafts or bone transport using the Ilizarov external fixator. The combination of local infection with a massive bone defect exacerbates the problem, and provides an even more negative prognosis. The authors treated a large bone defect of the forearm with local infection, using a one-bone forearm formation with a large vascularized fibula graft. They attached an adequate amount of muscle fascia to the vascularized fibula, which was useful not only for coverage of the skin defect, but also for treatment of the local infection. Twenty months after surgery, elbow and hand functions were maintained, and the patient had no disturbance of hand function in daily activities, although rotation of the forearm was sacrificed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 11
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/98. Supracondylar fractures of the humerus associated with ipsilateral forearm fractures in children: a report of forty-seven cases.

    Supracondylar fractures of the humerus associated with ipsilateral forearm fractures are uncommon and treatment recommendations are controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pin fixation of both fracture components, humerus and forearm, would improve the outcome. In a two-center trial, 884 children sustaining supracondylar fractures of the humerus were retrospectively reviewed, and 47 (5.3%) showed associated ipsilateral forearm fractures. Of those, 29 underwent Kirschner-wire fixation of the forearm fracture, and 18 of the forearm fractures were treated with casting alone. Three of the 18 forearm fractures with casting alone reangulated. There were no reangulations in the patients who had pin fixation of their fractures. There were no complications due to pin fixation in the humerus or the forearm. In unstable supracondylar humerus and forearm fractures, stabilization with pin fixation to prevent reangulation should be considered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 12
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/98. Missed chronic anterior Monteggia lesion. Closed reduction by gradual lengthening and angulation of the ulna.

    Two consecutive cases of chronic dislocation of the head of the radius after missed Bado type-I Monteggia lesions are presented. Reduction was successfully achieved in both patients after ulnar corticotomy, gradual lengthening and angulation of the ulna using an external fixator. Open reduction or reconstruction of the radio-ulnar capitellar joint was not undertaken. The age at injury was seven years in the older and two years in the younger patient. The time from injury to treatment was five years in the older and three months in the younger child. At follow-up, nine years after completion of treatment in the older and eight months in the younger patient, both show satisfactory movement, function of the forearm and reduction of the head of the radius. This technique may be considered in missed Monteggia lesions before open procedures on the radio-ulnar capitellar joint are undertaken.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Ulna Fractures'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.