Cases reported "Ulna Fractures"

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1/29. Sideswipe elbow fractures.

    A retrospective review of all cases of sideswipe elbow fractures (SSEFs) treated at two community hospitals from 1982 to 1992 was conducted to determine the functional outcome of the operative treatment of SSEFs. All five injuries involved the left elbow, and they included open fractures of the olecranon, the radius and ulna, the ulna and humerus, the humerus, and traumatic amputation of the arm. Concomitant injuries included three radial nerve palsies and two injuries each to the median nerve, ulnar nerve, and brachial artery. Treatment included irrigation, debridement (repeated if necessary), open reduction and internal fixation, external fixation (one case), and delayed amputation (one case). An average of 130/-10 degrees elbow flexion/extension, and 60/60 degrees supination/pronation was obtained for the three of four patients with reconstructions who returned for follow-up.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/29. Transcranial doppler detection of fat emboli.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The fat embolism syndrome (FES) is characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of pulmonary and neurological symptoms as well as skin and mucosal petechiae in the setting of long-bone fractures or their surgical repair. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood, and effective treatments are lacking. We present 5 patients with long-bone fractures in whom in vivo microembolism was detected by transcranial Doppler. methods: Five patients with long-bone fractures were monitored with transcranial Doppler for microembolic signals (MESs) after trauma. Two patients also had intraoperative monitoring. A TC-2020 instrument equipped with MES detection software was used. Detected signals were saved for subsequent review. Selected signals satisfied criteria defined previously and were categorized as large or small. RESULTS: Cerebral microembolism was detected in all 5 patients and was transient, resolving within 4 days of injury. Intraoperative monitoring revealed an increase in MESs during intramedullary nail insertion. The characteristics of MESs after injury varied among patients, with large signals being more frequent in the only patient with a patent foramen ovale. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral microembolism after long-bone fractures can be detected in vivo and monitored over time. These findings may have potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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3/29. Isolated type IIIA fracture of the coronoid process of ulna. A case report and brief review of literature.

    A very rare, Regan and Morrey's type IIIA fracture of the coronoid process of ulna is presented and discussed with a review of the literature. The operative approach to be used is emphasised. Open reduction and internal fixation render the elbow stable, and a good range of motion can be achieved if such fractures are fixed and mobilised early.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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4/29. Ulnar-styloid nonunion and partial rupture of extensor carpi ulnaris tendon: two case reports and review of the literature.

    Two unusual cases of symptomatic partial rupture of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon associated with ulnar-styloid nonunion are described. Intraoperative findings suggested that the jagged surface of the distal ulna was the cause of flaying. In one case, debridement of the frayed extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and fixation of the ulnar styloid were effective for the relief of symptoms. But after the same procedure in another case, osteosynthesis of the ulnar-styloid could not be attained and tenodesis of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon to the ulnar head was needed. Partial rupture of the ECU tendon should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a patient with ulnar wrist pain after ulnar-styloid fracture.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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5/29. Posttraumatic radioulnar synostosis treated with a free vascularized fat transplant and dynamic splint: a report of two cases.

    Two cases of posttraumatic radioulnar synostosis are presented. The patients were treated with excision of the cross-union and interposition of a free vascularized fat transplant. A newly devised pronation-supination dynamic splint was employed for 3 months postoperatively in both patients. After a 1-year postoperative follow-up, an increased range of motion was restored in both cases, and there was no evidence of recurrent synostosis formation in subsequent radiographs. We suggest that an interposed vascularized fat graft may be an ideal biologic barrier to fill the space created by cross-union excision.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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6/29. Bony entrapment of ulnar nerve after closed forearm fracture: a case report.

    We report a case of ulnar nerve palsy following forearm fracture in a 13-year-old girl. Significant anterior angulation and displacement of the ulna were noted. Operation was performed 3 months after the injury, when no recovery of numbness and claw hand deformity were demonstrated. Intra-operatively the ulnar nerve was found to be embedded between fragments of the fractured ulna, which showed lack of callus formation on the preoperative radiograph. The patient achieved complete recovery of sensory and motor functions 4 months after the surgery.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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7/29. Functional outcome after operative treatment of eight type III coronoid process fractures.

    BACKGROUND: There have been few reports about surgical outcomes of coronoid process fractures. Eight cases of clinical results of type III coronoid process fractures were reviewed. methods: Eight patients with coronoid type III fracture were retrospectively reviewed. All were men with an average age of 33 years. There were three isolated fractures, two elbow dislocations, two radial head and neck fractures, and one medial collateral ligament rupture. An open reduction and internal fixation through an anterior approach with cannulated screws was used. The patients were followed up for a mean of 31 months (range, 24-60 months). RESULTS: Average active elbow joint motion at the most recent follow-up was 105 degrees. The average Mayo Elbow Performance Score was 76.9 (range, 50-95). Of the results, there was one excellent, four good, two fair, and one poor. CONCLUSION: Early open reduction and stable internal fixation provided a reliable method for the treatment of type III coronoid process fractures. Any associated injuries to the elbow and fracture comminution were considered as important prognostic factors.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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8/29. median nerve palsy after operative treatment of olecranon fracture.

    Olecranon fracture is not an uncommon fracture in clinical practice. Simple olecranon fracture usually heals quite well without any types of iatrogenic complications. Despite close proximity of the fracture to the nerve, median nerve palsy after operative treatment of olecranon fracture is a rare complication. To the authors' knowledge, this complication has not been previously reported in the Thai or English literature. The authors present a patient who had median nerve palsy after tension-band wiring for olecranon fixation. Intraoperative finding revealed that the median nerve was injured by the tip of K-wire. While this complication is uncommon on a per-person basis, it may results in serious complication, such as nerve palsy or limb ischemia. Orthopedic surgeons must remain vigilant with regard to any type of internal fixation in the upper extremity because the risk of neurovascular injury is high.
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ranking = 6
keywords = operative
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9/29. Treatment of infected wounds with maggot therapy after replantation.

    Postoperative wound infection is a rare, but major, complication of replantation. Failure to control infection can lead directly to vascular thrombosis and, in turn, to loss of the replanted extremity. The use of maggots for wound debridement has a long history and has been lately re-introduced for treatment of intractable wounds. In this report, the authors present the experience of successful debridement of a severely infected wound after forearm replantation, using maggot therapy. The results and mechanism of maggot therapy are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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10/29. Pseudoarthrosis of the ulna in neurofibromatosis. A report of four cases.

    Four children suffering from neurofibromatosis with ulnar pseudarthrosis and progressive reabsorption of the middle and distal thirds of the ulna are reported. None had any pain or sensory loss, but all had progressive deformity of the forearm. Instability of the elbow and wrist were present in three cases, while one case showed good stability and function. A cross-union of the ulna with the radius to produce a one-bone forearm was accomplished using screw fixation and iliac bone grafting, and a one-bone forearm was achieved in three cases. Non-operative management was decided on in the patient with slow ulna reabsorption. The creation of a one-bone forearm is more likely to produce sound union, thus avoiding the need for further operations, while conservative management should be reserved for patients with a slowly progressive condition.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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