Cases reported "Ureteral Diseases"

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1/8. Urinomas as a complication of iatrogenic ureteric injuries in gynecological surgery.

    We examined the incidence of ureteric injuries in relation to gynecologic operations. In 5240 gynecological operations, eighteen (0.34%) cases of ureteric injuries and four cases of urinomas were found. We present the four cases of ureteric injuries that were found with postoperative development of urinomas.
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keywords = gynecologic
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2/8. diagnosis and management of post-cesarean ureterouterine fistulae.

    Urinary leakage following obstetric or gynecologic surgery is a dreaded complication, most often caused by a urogenital fistula. Of these, uretero-uterine fistulae are relatively rare and pose a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. A 29-year-old woman presented with paradoxical incontinence of urine for 3 months. She had developed vaginal leakage of urine 2 weeks following an uneventful cesarean section. Conservative measures in the form of catheterization and bed rest did not relieve her symptoms. Subsequent examination and investigations revealed that she had a ureterouterine fistula. The case is discussed as well as the diagnostic modalities and treatment options.
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keywords = gynecologic
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3/8. Fatal recurrent ureteroarterial fistulas after exenteration for cervical cancer.

    BACKGROUND: Ureteroarterial fistula (UAF) is a rare occurrence. It can be difficult to diagnose with a high mortality. We report a case of a recurrent UAF. CASE: A 38-year-old women diagnosed with cervical cancer had undergone pelvic exenteration for severe radiation-induced necrosis with a vesicovaginal and rectovaginal fistula after primary radiation therapy. hemorrhage into the urinary tract necessitated surgical intervention and vascular repair with a femoral-femoral bypass. Although these measures were effective, the patient died 6 months later following an acute hemorrhage into her conduit. Arteriogram revealed a second UAF. CONCLUSION: When urinary tract bleeding occurs in patients previously diagnosed with a gynecologic malignancy and treated with radiation therapy and extensive surgery with urinary diversion, UAF should be considered in the differential diagnoses.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
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4/8. Endovascular management of ureteral-iliac artery fistulae with Wallgraft endoprostheses.

    BACKGROUND: Ureteral-iliac artery fistulae are rare, yet potentially life-threatening, causes of hematuria. Treatment has traditionally been surgical, but advances in endovascular technology have led to a few recent reports of therapy with covered stents. We report two cases of patients diagnosed with ureteral-iliac artery fistulae who were treated with Wallgraft endoprostheses, a new, commercially available covered stent. CASES: We report two patients with gynecologic malignancies who presented with massive hematuria and hypotension and were subsequently proven to have ureteral-iliac arterial fistulae. Both patients had prior pelvic surgery, radiation, and chronic indwelling ureteral stents. Once the diagnosis was established, both patients were managed with endovascular covered stent placement. The patients' conditions stabilized, hematuria ceased, and both were discharged from the hospital without additional transfusion or surgical treatment. CONCLUSION: Endovascular therapy with covered stents is a safe, effective, and readily available method for the treatment of ureteral-iliac artery fistulae.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
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5/8. ureteroscopy: a new asset in the management of postoperative ureterovaginal fistulas.

    Iatrogenic ureteral injury, an uncommon entity, is primarily caused by complications of gynecologic surgery. This report describes a case of ureterovaginal fistula discovered 13 days after a vaginal hysterectomy. ureteroscopy was performed, with passage of an indwelling ureteral stent for 6 weeks. The patient immediately became continent of urine and the fistula healed, thus avoiding the need for further surgery.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
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6/8. Hutch paraureteral diverticulum complicating radical hysterectomy.

    BACKGROUND: Paraureteral diverticula are abnormalities of the urinary bladder which are more common in males, and thus are infrequently encountered in the patient population of the gynecologic oncologist. CASE REPORT: A 59 year old white female, with a history of recurrent bladder cancer treated by transurethral resection, presented with an abnormal cervical cone biopsy revealing invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix". The patient had a known Hutch paraureteral diverticulum for which she was receiving prophylactic cyprofloxacin. Computed tomography revealed an 8.5 x 8 x 7 cm paraureteral diverticulum on the right. There was no hydronephrosis of either renal pelvis. laparotomy revealed a mass, resembling a second urinary bladder, which was very closely associated with the bladder and lateral proximal vagina on the right. Since a urological consultant advised that the diverticulum should not be resected, dissection around the bladder and vagina for the radical hysterectomy was made much more difficult. CONCLUSION: The presence of a paraureteral diverticulum increases the difficulty of performing a radical hysterectomy.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
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7/8. Use of endoscopy in the management of postoperative ureterovaginal fistula.

    The aim of the study was to evaluate endourological techniques in the management of iatrogenic ureterovaginal fistula. Seventeen patients referred to us after gynecologic surgery were diagnosed as having iatrogenic ureterovaginal fistula. First, retrograde double-J stenting was tried. If this failed, percutaneous nephrostomy using an antegrade double-J stent was performed. If this also failed, open surgical repair was performed. The retrograde double-J stent bypassed the fistula in 2 patients (11.8%). Percutaneous nephrostomy was performed in the remaining 15. The antegrade double-J stent bypassed the fistula in another 2 of these patients (11.8%). Open surgical repair was performed in the remaining 13 patients (67.5%) (direct ureteroneocystostomy) with nipple valve in 11 patients and Boari flap with psoas hitch in 2 patients). Of all patients, 2 had ureteral stricture, one after antegrade double-J stenting and the other after open repair. It was concluded that early intervention is recommended in the treatment of iatrogenic uretrovaginal fistula, causing minimal morbidity and discomfort, and being less expensive.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
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8/8. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the ureter and the urinary bladder.

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPS) of the urinary bladder was first described in 1980. We report four cases of IPS which occurred during the last four years. One tumor occurred in the bladder of a 49-year-old woman five months after abdominal hysterectomy of uterine leiomyomas, two tumors in a 35- and 39-year-old woman, respectively, without antecedental surgical intervention (though one with recidive after six months). The fourth occurred in a 64-year-old male in the proximal ureter by pyelonephritis. Two cases were initially diagnosed at frozen section during operative treatment, the others on paraffine section after immunohistochemical examination. Two cases showed an aberrant expression of cytokeratines. There is no evidence of recidive tumor within a mean follow up of 25 months (12-49 months). Features to differentiate benign from malignant spindle cell lesions of the lower urinary tract are the absence of atypical mitoses, significant cytologic atypia, absence of necroses within the tumor (rather on its surface), no destructive growth at the tumor margins and low cellularity. Usually, IPS show a submucosal edematous area with a deeper, highly cellular component. The clinical history of a recent bladder operation or gynecologic surgery is of upmost importance in making the diagnosis of IPS. Complete surgical excision, either by transurethral resection or partial cystectomy appears to be curative for IPS.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
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