Cases reported "Ureteral Obstruction"

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11/270. Dismembered pyeloplasty followed by metachronous ureteropelvic junction obstruction in the contralateral kidney.

    hydronephrosis due to congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is commonly diagnosed by antenatal sonography. We report the case of an infant who developed new-onset hydronephrosis in the right kidney following uneventful left-sided pyeloplasty for a congenital UPJO. The furosemide minus 15-minute diuretic renogram (F-15 DR) was used to confirm obstruction in the affected renal unit when standard diuretic renography was equivocal. The indications for surgery or observation as well as the role of the F-15 DR are discussed.
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12/270. Intrarenal cystic mass with pelviureteral junction obstruction.

    An abdominal mass in the first year after birth most commonly originates from the kidney. Renal masses in this age group are often cystic and may be associated with other abnormalities. We describe an unusual benign unilateral cystic lesion and coexisting pelviureteral junction obstruction in a newborn male with an otherwise morphologically and functionally normal urinary tract. A near normal kidney resulted from subsequent resection of the cyst wall combined with pyeloplasty.
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13/270. Combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopic approach for the management of urinary diversion-associated pathology.

    BACKGROUND: Endourologic management of stones and strictures in patients with a urinary diversion is often cumbersome because of the absence of standard anatomic landmarks. We report on our technique of minimally invasive management of urinary diversion-associated pathology by means of a combined antegrade and retrograde approach. patients AND methods: Five patients with urinary diversion-associated pathology were treated at our institution between May 1997 and October 1998. Their problems were: an obstructing ureteral stone in a man with ureterosigmoidostomy performed for bladder extrophy; two men with a valve stricture in their hemiKock urinary diversions; an anastomotic stricture in a man with an ileal loop diversion; and a long left ureteroenteric stricture in a man with a right colon pouch diversion. After percutaneous placement of an guidewire across the area of interest, the targeted pathology was accessed via a retrograde approach using standard semirigid or flexible fiberoptic endoscopes. Postoperative follow-up with intravenous urography, differential renal scan, or both was performed at 3 to 24 months (mean 12 months). RESULTS: The combined antegrade and retrograde approach allowed successful access to pathologic areas in all patients. holmium laser/Acucise incision of stenotic segments or ballistic fragmentation of stones was achieved in all cases without perioperative complications. None of the strictures with an initially successful outcome has recurred; however, in one patient, the procedure failed as soon as the internal stent was removed. The patient with the ureteral calculus remains stone free, and his ureterosigmoidostomy is patent without evidence of obstruction on his last imaging study, 24 months postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: Combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopic access to the area of interest is our preferred method of approaching pathologic problems in patients with a urinary diversion. An antegrade nephrostogram provides better delineation of anatomy, while through-and-through access enables rapid and easier identification of stenotic segments that may be hidden by mucosal folds. Furthermore, this approach allows the use of larger semirigid or flexible endoscopes in conjunction with more efficient fragmentation devices, resulting in enhanced vision from better irrigation. Finally, an initial endoscopic approach may be preferred because its failure does not compromise the success of future open surgery.
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14/270. Bladder outflow obstruction masquerading as pelviureteric junction (PUJ) obstruction.

    We report a case of bladder outflow obstruction presenting with upper tract dilatation mistaken initially as pelviureteric junction (PUJ) obstruction. The lower tract obstruction ought to be dealt with first before upper tract obstruction is assessed because the renal pelvic pressure is significantly affected by vesical filling and high bladder pressure.
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15/270. An endourologic approach to complete ureteropelvic junction and ureteral strictures.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Complete stricture of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ), ureter, or both represents a secondary upper tract obstruction and is a challenge for surgical management. The endourologic repair of these complete strictures remains controversial because of the many unsatisfactory results in the literature. The aim of this study was to achieve recanalization of the ureter or the UPJ using endourologic techniques to prove durable success of this technique. patients AND methods: We present data on the 21 patients with complete UPJ or ureteral strictures treated over 5-year period. The length of the obliterated portion of the ureter or UPJ ranged from 0.3 to 1.7 cm. The stricture was at the UPJ level in 12 patients (57%), in the upper ureter in 3, and in the lower ureter in 4. The technique was a combined approach, with antegrade introduction of the guidewire and retrograde cold-knife incision in the majority of the cases. In five cases, the incision was carried out in the reverse direction with a guidewire introduced retrograde up to the stricture level. An originally designed 6F to 7F polyethylene double-J stent with a movable 12F to 16F silicon sheath or percutaneous tube was placed at the completion of the procedure. RESULTS: The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 48 months. Recanalization was achieved in 17 patients (81%), of whom 14 became symptom free. Other surgical outcomes necessitated open surgical intervention (pyeloplasty, nephrectomy) in two patients. One patient developed a clinically significant recurrent urinary tract infection and deterioration of kidney function. Thus, the overall success rate of the endourologic management of the complete UPJ and ureteral strictures was 67% in our series. CONCLUSION: Endourologic management with retrograde or antegrade pyeloureterotomy can be successful in patients with short (up to 1.0-cm) obliterative strictures who are without extensive hydronephrosis and with preserved renal function.
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16/270. Successful management of lower-pole moiety ureteropelvic junction obstruction in a partially duplicated collecting system using minimally invasive retrograde endoscopic techniques.

    Although the true incidence of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction in the lower-pole moiety of an incompletely duplicated renal collecting system remains elusive, the description of this entity in the published literature is exceedingly rare. To our knowledge, we report the first case of this entity managed successfully by ureteroscopic holmium laser incision of the stenotic UPJ segment. This case underscores the utility of minimally invasive techniques in the management of selected cases of UPJ obstruction associated with a partially duplicated collecting system.
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17/270. Calculus formation on a retained Acucise wire.

    We report the case of a patient who developed an obstructing calculus embedded at the ureteropelvic junction after treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction with the Acucise cutting balloon catheter. Within the length of the stone, we found a wire consistent with the cutting wire. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a fractured and retained cutting wire resulting in calculus formation.
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18/270. Left multicystic dysplastic kidney with contralateral ectopic kidney and ureterovesicle junction obstruction.

    multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) represents the most common cause of abdominal mass in the neonatal period. It is usually combined with contralateral genitourinary tract anomaly. Because the multicystic dysplastic kidney is usually dysfunctional, it is important to evaluate and monitor the remaining preserved function of the contralateral kidney regularly. The presence of severe obstructive lesion over contralateral kidney is often life-threatening. Prompt treatment should therefore be given as early as possible to preserve the remaining renal function. We here report one rare case of left MCDK with contralateral ectopic kidney and ureterovesicle junction (UVJ) obstruction. As the best as we know, this report is the first case report of MCDK with contralateral ectopic kidney and UVJ obstruction.
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19/270. Trans-pyeloureteric anastomosis in the management of pelviureteric junction obstruction.

    BACKGROUND: The application of pyeloureteric anastomoses in the management of pelviureteric junction obstruction is described. methods: Two patients, one requiring a ureterocystoplasty for bladder augmentation but with a coexistent contralateral pelviureteric junction (PUJ) obstruction and the other with gross hydronephrosis but an atretic ipsilateral ureter, underwent trans-pyeloureteric anastomosis to relieve the obstruction. RESULTS: Both patients demonstrated satisfactory drainage of the upper tracts on postoperative imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Transureteropyeloplasty represents a novel and valid technique of urinary tract reconstruction in complex cases of PUJ obstruction.
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20/270. Antenatal hydronephrosis with postnatal resolution: how long are postnatal studies warranted?

    We present 2 cases of antenatal hydronephrosis with initial normalization of postnatal studies. Both patients experienced late-onset (6 and 22 months) hydronephrosis secondary to ureteropelvic junction obstruction, necessitating surgical intervention. These cases raise questions about the need for late follow-up imaging in patients with apparent resolution of hydronephrosis diagnosed antenatally.
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