Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/159. Ureteric obstruction due to kinking of the reservoir inlet in a continent urinary reservoir.

    We report a case of symptomatic intermittent upper tract obstruction in a continent urinary reservoir. The ureters were of great intraperitoneal length and were positioned in front of the mesenterium, resulting in a mobile reservoir. Only the retroperitoneal part of the ureters was dilated due to kinking in the peritoneal passage. After the ureters were shortened and reanastomosed retroperitoneally, the repeated episodes of abdominal pain and discomfort disappeared..
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = urinary
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/159. An unexpected complicationof the remote-controlled intraurethral valve pump for urinary incontinence.

    We report an unexpected complication of the remote-controlled intraurethral valve pump in a patient with neurogenic bladder. A meningomyelocele patient with an atonic bladder received an intraurethral valve pump. Acute urinary retention was caused by a mucus clot obstructing the pump. Prior to extended clinical use, the remote-controlled intraurethral valve pump should be evaluated in prospective multicenter studies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5502376992986
keywords = urinary retention, urinary, retention
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/159. Vesicocolonic fistula four years after augmentation colocystoplasty.

    An 8-year-old girl was born with crossed fused renal ectopia and neurogenic bladder due to sacral agenesis. Due to progressive upper tract deterioration and incontinence despite clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy with anticholinergic agents, the patient underwent augmentation colocystoplasty at the age of 4 years. Four years after surgery the girl was readmitted because of persistent febrile urinary tract infection, persistent metabolic acidosis, and intermittent watery diarrhea. A cystogram revealed a fistula between the dome of the augmented bladder and the transverse colon. The fistula was successfully resected. The presence of enterovesical fistula should always be suspected in a patient with augmented bladder who have late onset of urinary tract infection, metabolic acidosis, and diarrhea.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = urinary
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/159. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to Behcet's disease.

    BACKGROUND: Behcet's disease is a chronic multisystem condition of unknown origin. Genitourinary tract involvement with genital apthous ulcers, epididymitis, urethritis and recurrent cystitis is encountered commonly. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to neural involvement of the syndrome, has been reported extremely rarely. methods: A case of neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to Behcet's disease is presented. The patient was 17-year-old young male with a long history of the disease and neurological affection, but with neglected lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence. The patient was diagnosed urodynamically to have hyperreflexic detrusor. RESULTS/DISCUSSION: After failure of medical treatment (oxybutynin chloride) the patient submitted to augmentation clam-type sigmoidocystoplasty. Four years postoperatively, the patient is dry, on clean intermittent self catheterization twice daily and he is practically asymptomatic from lower urinary tract symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.8
keywords = urinary
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/159. cauda equina syndrome due to lumbosacral arachnoid cysts in children.

    We describe the clinical, neuroradiological and surgical aspects of two children in whom symptoms attributable to cauda equina compression were caused by spinal arachnoid cysts. The first patient presented with recurrent urinary tract infections due to neurogenic bladder dysfunction, absent deep tendon reflexes and sensory deficit in the lower limbs. The second child presented with unstable gait as a result of weakness and diminished sensation in the lower extremities. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lumbosacral arachnoid cyst in both patients. During surgery the cysts were identified and excised. Two years after surgery, the sensory deficits of the first patient have disappeared and patellar and ankle reflexes can be elicited, but there is no improvement in bladder function. Neurological examination of the second patient was normal. We conclude that the diagnosis of cauda equina syndrome should prompt a vigorous search for its aetiology. Lumbosacral arachnoid cysts are a rare cause of cauda equina syndrome in children.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = urinary
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/159. Bladder-wall abscess in a girl with neurogenic bladder.

    We report a case of a bladder-wall abscess in a patient with myelodysplasia and a neurogenic bladder. The aetiology of the abscess was obscure, but the patient had recurrent urinary tract infections and was being managed by clean intermittent catheterisation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = urinary
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/159. Single kidney outcome and management in persons with spinal cord injury.

    This case study examined the outcomes of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) who had a single kidney. A Urologic database, including 1655 persons with SCI between 1969 and 1997, was examined and 22 persons were identified with single kidneys. Twenty persons had adequate follow-up. Renal function was measured by total and individual kidney effective renal plasma flow (ERPF). Of 11 persons who had a single kidney prior to injury or as a result of an associated injury, all maintained a normal ERPF for an average of 8.6 years. Of 9 persons who had removal of a kidney following their injury for other diseases or urinary complications, 3 were deceased, but 2 had a normal ERPF in the remaining kidney prior to death. One with vesicoureteral reflux had decreased renal function in the remaining kidney. Recurrent renal calculi in a single kidney carries risks for decreasing renal function, urosepsis, and death.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = urinary
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/159. Bladder cancer arising in a spina bifida patient.

    We report the case of a 52-year-old patient with spina bifida, neurologic bladder, and a history of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) in whom a bladder cancer was incidentally discovered. Cytology, cystoscopy, and cystography showed nonspecific, extensive inflammatory lesions. Cystography demonstrated a complex of diverticulae and cellules. Pathologic examination of a diverticulectomy specimen revealed a grade III pT3b transitional and squamous cell carcinoma. Because of the similar disease causation (recurrent UTIs, stones, and indwelling catheterization), we suggest extension of the guidelines proposed for patients with spinal cord injuries (ie, annual serial bladder biopsies) to patients with nontraumatic neurogenic bladder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = urinary
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/159. Concomitant presence of bladder cancer and neurogenic bladder in a patient with HTLV-1 carrier: a case report.

    We describe a case of an HTLV-1 carrier who developed bladder cancer and neurogenic bladder. HTLV-1 is thought to alter host immune function and to contribute to the development of other malignancies. It is also sometimes reported that urinary symptoms precede pyramidal symptoms in patients with HAM. To our knowledge, concomitant presence of bladder cancer and neurogenic bladder in an HTLV-1 carrier has not been previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = urinary
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/159. Xanthogranulomatous funiculitis and epididymo-orchitis in a tetraplegic patient.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report of xanthogranulomatous funiculitis and epididymo-orchitis. Xanthogranulomatous inflammation is an uncommon, non-neoplastic process characterised by destruction of tissue, which is replaced by a striking cellular infiltrate of lipid-laden macrophages. CASE REPORT: A 21-year male sustained complete tetraplegia at C-6 level, after a fall in 1998. The neuropathic bladder was managed with an indwelling urethral catheter. He had many unsuccessful trials of micturition. Sixteen months after the cervical injury, he noticed swelling of the left side of the scrotum following removal of a blocked catheter. He was prescribed antibacterial therapy. Four weeks later, physical examination revealed a hard and irregular swelling encompassing the testis, epididymis and spermatic cord. The clinical diagnosis was epididymo-orchitis progressing to pyocele. Through a scrotal incision, the swollen testis, epididymis and diseased segment of the spermatic cord were removed en masse. Histopathology showed extensive areas of necrosis, with xanthogranulomatous inflammation in the spermatic cord and to a lesser extent in the testis/epididymis. CONCLUSION: Repeated episodes of high-pressure urinary reflux along the vas deferens during dyssynergic voiding, and subsequent interstitial extravasation of urine together with chronic, low-grade, suppurative infection possibly led to development of xanthogranulomatous inflammation in the testis and the epididymis. Since tissue destruction is a feature of xanthogranulomatous inflammation, the definite and curative treatment is either complete (or, where applicable, partial) excision of the affected organ in most of the cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = urinary
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.