Cases reported "Urinary Bladder Calculi"

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1/10. Development of a large bladder calculus on sutures used for pubic bone closure following extrophy repair.

    bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital condition that occurs in 1 to 30,000 live births. Primary bladder closure is usually performed in the first days of life in conjunction with an iliac osteotomy in order to achieve a more secure bladder closure. We report a case of a large bladder stone with secondary right-sided hydronephrosis in a 3-year-old child who underwent exstrophy repair at the age of 7 months. During the exstrophy repair a no. 1 braided, polyester, non-absorbable suture was used to close the pubic bones and served as a nidus for intravesical stone formation. This case substantiates the lithogenic nature of non-absorbable sutures in contact with urine as well as the need for close post-operative follow-up in these patients.
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2/10. Spontaneous feeding tube knotting over a vesical calculus.

    A case of spontaneous feeding tube knotting over a vesical calculus, in a 3 years child, is presented which had evaded clinical diagnosis and was discovered at open cystolithotomy. A vesical calculus with a firm simple knot of feeding tube over it and stuck at internal urethral meatus was found. Feeding tube was cut and cystolithotomy performed. Postoperative follow-up was without complication.
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3/10. Postprostatectomy lithiasis.

    After a short historical survey and a comprehensive review of the world literature which comprises 242 cases (including 19 personal ones), 10 new cases of lithiasis after prostatectomy are added (5 of which are personal ones), making a total of 252 cases. The CT scan was very useful in the diagnostic imaging. In appropriate situations, the use of the stone basket was found advantageous. In patients who are at risk of developing stones after prostatectomy, great care should be exercised both during the operation and in the postoperative period.
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4/10. Bladder calculus formation as a complication of the Stamey procedure.

    Three cases of bladder stone due to a migrated Stamey suture and cuff are reported. In each case peroperative cystoscopy confirmed that the sutures were extravesical. The Stamey cuff subsequently formed a nidus for intravesical stone formation. The mechanism of migration of the cuff, the radiological findings and the operative technique are discussed.
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5/10. Hyponatraemia and mental symptoms following vesical ultrasonic lithotripsy.

    A patient became confused and restless after vesical ultrasonic lithotripsy performed with distilled water as the irrigant. serum sodium decreased to 120 mmol/litre from the pre-operative value of 138 mmol/litre. A cystogram revealed intraperitoneal extravasation of contrast. She recovered promptly after intravenous infusion of normal saline and emergency surgery for repair of the damaged bladder wall. This case illustrates that hyponatraemia and mental symptoms similar to those following transurethral resection syndrome also occur with ultrasonic lithotripsy when distilled water is used as the irrigant.
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6/10. Postoperative complication from hemostatic clips.

    Hemostatic clips were found in a patient's bladder four months after radical retropubic prostatectomy. A calculus, which had formed on one clip, caused acute urinary retention. Inadvertent enclosure of the hemoclips within the bladder intraoperatively and early intraurethral migration of the hemoclips are possible causes of this complication. Although this problem is rarely reported, hemoclips should be used sparingly, if at all, around the vesicourethral anastomosis.
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ranking = 5
keywords = operative
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7/10. The etiology and treatment of delayed bleeding following percutaneous lithotripsy.

    In 1,032 percutaneous stone manipulations the incidence of significant, documented or presumed vascular injuries was 0.9 per cent. Seven cases of pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula or vascular lacerations were found, all of which were diagnosed angiographically. The patients were treated successfully with transcatheter embolization techniques. Two additional patients experienced delayed bleeding, presumably from vascular injuries, which resolved spontaneously with conservative therapy. Arteriography should be performed in these patients with serious postoperative bleeding. Embolization of the peripheral vessel is preferable to flank exploration.
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8/10. Massive prostatic hypertrophy.

    An unusual case is presented in which an enormously enlarged prostate gland, producing minimal urinary tract symptoms and changes, was removed via the retropubic route without operative complications and with a benign postoperative course. Applicability of the retropubic procedure in such cases is emphasized. A brief review of the literature is tabulated.
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9/10. Bilateral intravesical duplex system ureteroceles with multiple calculi in an adult patient.

    We present a case report of an adult female patient with bilateral duplex system ureteroceles, containing multiple small stones. There was no history of urinary tract infections or stone disease. Treatment consisted of right upper pole heminephrectomy because of non-function and transurethral incision of the left ureterocele, resulting in almost complete removal of the calculi. Furthermore no vesicoureteral reflux was seen 3 months postoperatively. Transurethral incision is a safe and effective treatment in removing stones in ureteroceles without necessitating further treatment because of vesicoureteral reflux.
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10/10. Dumbbell stone of prostatic fossa after prostatectomy. A combined ESWL and suprapubic percutaneous treatment.

    We report our experience with a combined treatment of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous suprapubic lithotripsy for a dumbbell-shaped stone of prostatic fossa associated with multiple bladder calculi, in the same operative session. Because of the successful result, we believe the association of the two treatments for this complex calculus to be an easy, effective and minimally invasive method. ESWL should be considered for the primary management of these rare calculi, suprapubic percutaneous endoscopy can be helpful in rapid and complete removal of fragments.
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