Cases reported "Urinary Bladder Calculi"

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1/59. Unusual case of Munchausen's syndrome: factitious vesical lithiasis.

    We report an uncommon case of a 38-year-old woman who admitted for bladder lithiasis undergoing repeated surgical management and being apparently recurrent. The intravenous pyelography and retrograde urethrocystography clear the urinary tract. Biologic evaluation eliminates any metabolic or endocrine cause. The confirmation of a factitious origin is given by fluorescence X analysis of the extracted stones which conclude to calcium carbonate structure and psychiatric care. The self-intromission of these calculi into the bladder is due to the personality disorder being in the frame of Munchausen's syndrome. Two years later, no recurrence is noted and an excellent psychiatric care is achieved.
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keywords = urinary
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2/59. An unusual presentation of a foreign body in the urinary bladder: A migrant intrauterine device.

    A 35-year-old woman, who had had an intrauterine device inserted 7 years earlier, presented with dysuria, pollakiuria, suprapubic pain and urethral irritation. The intrauterine device was found in the bladder with stone formation and was removed by endoscopy.
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keywords = urinary
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3/59. Percutaneous vesicolithotomy: an alternative to open bladder surgery in patients with an impassable or surgically ablated urethra.

    PURPOSE: Although vesical calculi are routinely treated transurethrally, open vesicolithotomy is generally performed in patients with an impassable or surgically ablated urethra. We describe a technique of percutaneous vesicolithotomy which we used in patients who had undergone urethral ablation and concomitant continent diversion by appendicovesicostomy. MATERIALS AND methods: Bladder stones were detected in 3 patients with neurogenic bladder who had undergone continent urinary diversion with bladder neck closure and appendicovesicostomy. To treat the stones access to the bladder was achieved percutaneously and the tract was enlarged using a balloon dilator. An Amplatz sheath was slipped over the inflated balloon and after the dilator was removed the sheath provided a working channel through which stones were fragmented and removed using a nephroscope. RESULTS: Each patient was rendered stone-free and discharged home the same day as the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous vesicolithotomy provides an alternative approach for bladder stone removal in patients with an impassable urethra with decreased morbidity compared to open procedures.
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keywords = urinary
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4/59. xanthine stone in the urinary bladder of a male child.

    urinary tract calculi composed primarily of xanthine are rate both in adults and children. We describe the clinical presentation and management of a 3.5-year-old boy with hereditary xanthinuria (an autosomal recessive disorder of purine metabolism) and primary bladder calculus formed from xanthine. To our knowledge this case demonstrates a previously undescribed form of xanthinuria in childhood. xanthine stones, although rare, should be considered in the diagnosis of urolithiasis.
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keywords = urinary
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5/59. Intravesical migration of AMS 800 artificial urinary sphincter and stone formation in a patient who underwent radical prostatectomy.

    A patient who underwent placement of AMS 800 urinary sphincter for incontinence after salvage prostatectomy after radiation therapy failure, experienced urethral erosion of the cuff after 54 months. He was treated with cuff removal and prosthesis deactivation. Thirteen months later, a large bladder stone was removed transvesically, and it contained the reservoir. The remaining sphincter components were also removed. patients with previous radiotherapy are particularly at risk for sphincter erosion, but intravesical displacement of the reservoir is a very uncommon complication.
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keywords = urinary
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6/59. Characteristic plain radiographic and intravenous urographic findings of bladder calculi formed over a hair nidus: a case report.

    We present the characteristic plain radiographic and intravenous urographic (IVU) findings of calculus formed over a hair. A 66-year-old man who had been quadriplegic for 40 years because of vertebral injury was admitted for further evaluation of frequent urinary tract infection. Plain radiography showed a linear, serpiginous calcification in the lower abdomen, and IVU revealed a round filling defect with linear radiopacity in the bladder, suggesting calculus. The gross appearance of the stone after extraction demonstrated that calcification had formed over a hair.
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keywords = urinary
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7/59. 31-Year-old bladder diverticulocutaneous fistula with a giant stone as a complication of pelvic fracture.

    Pelvic fractures associated with urinary bladder rupture are not rare, however, bladder fistulae are a rare complication after primary repair of bladder rupture. To our knowledge, we present the first case of a vesical diverticulocutaneous fistula after pelvic fractures. Etiology, presentation. diagnosis, and management are discussed.
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keywords = urinary
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8/59. Removal of bladder stone with metal wire infrastructure.

    There are reports of a wide variety of foreign materials, placed purposefully or inadvertantly, that have been found in the lower urinary tract. Due to encrustatation, some of these objects may initially appear to be simple stones. A careful evaluation with an appropriate index of suspicion is needed to aid in the determination of whether one of these complex structures may be present. A determination of the composition of the structure will allow the surgeon to employ the most safe and expeditious means of removal. We report a case of a large bladder stone with a metal wire infrastructure that was removed by open cystolithotomy
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keywords = urinary
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9/59. Bladder calculus formation and urinary retention secondary to perforation of a normal bladder by a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    urinary retention due to bladder calculus formation is unusual in the pediatric population. This case report describes a rare sequence of events in which a bladder stone formed secondary to the erosion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt through a normal bladder wall. A review of the literature is included.
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ranking = 7.1801723916619
keywords = urinary, urinary retention, retention
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10/59. Sonography of a human jackstone calculus.

    Jackstone calculi are urinary tract stones that have a specific appearance resembling toy jacks. They are almost always composed of calcium oxalate dihydrate and may be found in the urinary bladder or rarely in the upper urinary tract. Their appearance on plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) in human patients has been well described. They have also been imaged in several species of animals. However, our review of the English medical literature revealed no previous report in which a jackstone calculus had been identified on the sonographic examination of a human patient. We report a case in which a large jackstone calculus was incidentally detected during abdominal sonography in a 75-year-old man.
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keywords = urinary
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