Cases reported "Urinary Calculi"

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1/121. New aspects of urinary tuberculosis.

    In urinary tuberculosis, during recent years, there has been remarkable progress in treatment but some new aspects are reported, which raise problems in diagnosis and therapeutics. There is an increase of silent forms, forms with rapid destructive development, even under treatment, and forms masked by association with other diseases. The percentage of elderly patients has increased, as has the number of cases presenting with advanced lesions with little clinical manifestation. This calls for more careful searching, assessment and survey of any suspected case.
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2/121. Giant calculus in a female urethral diverticulum.

    Urethral diverticula with calculi are rare. This 5x6 cm calculus presented in a patient with recurrent urinary tract infections. Local excision was effective.
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3/121. Bilateral percutaneous nephrolithotomy for multiple cystine stones in an infant presenting with anuria.

    We report the first case of simultaneous, bilateral percutaneous management of multiple urinary cystine stones in a 7.6-kg, 9-month-old infant who presented with anuria. A stone-free state was successfully achieved.
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4/121. urolithiasis following formation of a continent urostomy: case report and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Formation of urinary stones in a continent urostomy (indiana pouch) has been described as a late complication. Management of a patient with symptomatic multiple large stones and review of the literature are outlined. CASE REPORT: A 32-year-old woman presented with recurrent urinary tract infections and pyelonephritis 6 years after a total pelvic exenteration and creation of a continent urostomy for central recurrent carcinoma of the cervix after radical pelvic radiation. Multiple large stones were found to be the underlying etiology. laparotomy, enterocystotomy, and removal of stones were performed without apparent complication. CONCLUSION: It is recommended that for single calculi or multiple small stones, electroshock wave lithotripsy or the percutaneous endoscopic approach be considered. For larger stones the use of laparotomy and enterocystostomy may be appropriate.
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5/121. Matrix calculi.

    Matrix calculi are an uncommon form of urinary tract concretion. They must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a radiolucent mass within the renal collecting system or ureter. The clinical and radiographic features of three cases are presented and the literature of matrix calculi is reviewed.
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keywords = urinary
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6/121. Felbamate urolithiasis.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of felbamate (FBM) urolithiasis. methods: Urographic imaging [sonography, abdominal computed tomography (CT), intravenous pyelogram, voiding cystourethrogram] and urologic procedures (cystoscopy with lithotripsy, ureteral stent) to define and capture the stones. Stone identification was by infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. RESULTS: A 15-year-old boy had painful hematuria, bilateral ureteral obstruction, and urinary retention. kidney, bladder, and ureteral stones were found, and ureteral stent placement was required to relieve obstruction. The stone material was identified as FBM by chemical analysis. Stone formation ceased with discontinuation of FBM. CONCLUSIONS: FBM urolithiasis can occur, and possible contributory factors include high felbamate dosage, drug polypharmacy, and risk factors for forming stones of other types. FBM urolithiasis may be heralded by crystalluria.
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ranking = 0.36181357518389
keywords = urinary, urinary retention, retention
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7/121. Recurrent abdominal and flank pain in children with idiopathic hypercalciuria.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children. patients AND methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 124 children referred for various complaints who had 24-h urine calcium excretion greater than 2 mg/kg/d or random urine calcium-creatinine ratio greater than 0.18 mg/mg. RESULTS: Fifty-two children with various clinical complaints had RAP or flank pain. These comprised of 22 males and 30 females, 9 mo to 15.9 y of age, mean 6.7 /- 3.5 y. A family history of urolithiasis was present in 50% of all the children. Only 6 of the 52 children with abdominal pain had renal stones. In addition to abdominal pain, 27 children had hematuria and 10 had urinary incontinence. Mild metabolic acidosis was present in three children, parathyroid hormone activity elevated in two and serum vitamin d activity was increased in nine. All children were treated with increased fluid intake and a reduction in dietary sodium and oxalate and some required treatment with thiazide and antispasmodics. Forty-five cases responded to treatment, 5 failed to improve from therapy, and 2, which were not followed up as patients, were not available. CONCLUSION: We describe 52 children with RAP or back pain due to IH and recommend that IH be considered in the differential diagnosis of RAP in childhood.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = urinary
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8/121. Chronic renal failure secondary to oxalate nephropathy: a preventable complication after jejunoileal bypass.

    Enteric hyperoxaluria is a commonly seen adverse event after the jejunoileal bypass procedure. The increased concentration of urinary oxalate predisposes bypass patients to various renal complications such as nephrolithiasis and oxalate nephropathy. If not diagnosed and appropriately treated, these complications can lead to irreversible renal damage. We describe 3 patients in whom severe renal complications developed with irreversible compromise of renal function after a jejunoileal bypass. patients who undergo a jejunoileal bypass require lifelong follow-up with close monitoring of their renal function. Marked decline in renal function mandates prompt investigation and aggressive intervention, including reversal of the jejunoileal bypass if necessary. Chronic renal failure secondary to oxalate nephropathy is preventable and treatable but may require conversion of a jejunoileal bypass to a more current form of bypass.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = urinary
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9/121. Preputial calculi: a case report.

    The patient was a 92-year-old male whose chief complaint was urinary retention. The x-ray film showed multiple overlapping calcification shadows in the penile region. renal insufficiency was speculated to be due to post-renal obstruction. Under the diagnoses of closure of the preputial orifice by balanoposthitis followed by urinary retention and preputial calculi, an urgent dorsal incision of the prepuce was made. Then, stone removal and indwelling catheter placement were performed. Renal function recovered soon after the operation, and the patient could urinate freely without catheterization. This case reminds us of the significance of surgical treatment for phimosis in elderly patients.
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ranking = 0.72362715036779
keywords = urinary, urinary retention, retention
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10/121. Urethral calculi managed with transurethral holmium laser ablation.

    In situ holmium laser lithotripsy is a safe, effective procedure for the treatment of impacted urethral stones. This procedure can be performed transurethrally as an outpatient with minimal tissue trauma and render patients stone free. The authors utilized this procedure in 2 patients whose anatomy did not allow the calculi to be manipulated into the urinary bladder in a retrograde manner. Because of its successful use elsewhere in the urinary tract, we believe that holmium laser lithotripsy may be the treatment of choice for impacted urethral stones.
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ranking = 0.4
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