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11/61. Botulinum toxin urethral sphincter injection resolves urinary retention after pubovaginal sling operation.

    The management of prolonged urinary retention following pubovaginal sling surgery typically involves transvaginal urethrolysis for anatomical urethral obstruction. Brubaker [1] recently reported on urethral sphincter abnormalities as a cause of postoperative urinary retention following either Burch suspension or pubovaginal sling procedure. We report a case of functional urethral obstruction and detrusor acontractility following pubovaginal sling surgery that was successfully treated by botulinum A toxin urethral sphincter injection.
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12/61. Post-colposuspension syndrome following a tension-free vaginal tape procedure.

    A 51-year-old nurse underwent an uneventful TVT procedure. Two weeks postoperatively she developed intractable suprapubic pain directly over the iliopectineal ligaments consistent with a "post-colposuspension syndrome". This failed to respond to conservative therapy and she subsequently underwent exploration of the retropubic space. The TVT sling was found to be densely adherent to the iliopectineal ligaments, from which it was dissected free and then divided, leaving the part where it passes through the endopelvic fascia intact. The pain resolved immediately and the woman remained continent. This diagnosis should be considered in a woman presenting with groin pain following a sling procedure.
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13/61. Bowel perforation during insertion of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT).

    A 56-year-old non-obese woman with a previous history of pelvic surgery underwent an uneventful TVT procedure for the treatment of genuine stress incontinence. Postoperatively she began to report an acute low abdominal pain and a secondary laparoscopy was performed. The view of the right iliac region showed the tape passing through a loop of the small intestine. The tape was cut in its intraperitoneal portion and the ileum freed and repaired. After the operation the patient recovered well and was discharged on the fifth day after laparoscopy. Despite the section of the tape, 1 year later the patient is objectively cured by the procedure.
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keywords = operative
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14/61. A rare complication with TVT: vaginal protrusion of the tape.

    The authors report a rare postoperative complication of TVT. A 38-year-old woman, suffering from genuine stress incontinence, presented 3 weeks after surgery with a 1 cm protrusion of the TVT across the median vaginal scar. A fastening point on the tape and covering it with the vaginal skin was unsuccessful. Three weeks later, we found a 5 mm protrusion of the tape. At this time we decided to resect the protruding fibers but without interrupting the tape. Regular clinical checks showed good local cicatrization, and 4 weeks later the vaginal epithelium covered the tape completely and the patient no longer suffered from genuine stress incontinence.
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keywords = operative
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15/61. Delayed suture intravesical migration as a complication of a Stamey endoscopic bladder neck suspension.

    We report our experience with two cases of late migration of the suture and bolster occurring 2 years after a modified Stamey endoscopic bladder neck suspension. Delayed migration of the suture and bolster after an endoscopic bladder neck suspension across tissue planes, with subsequent erosion into the bladder, is uncommon. Recurrent urinary tract infection and mild suprapubic discomfort were the only symptoms. cystoscopy was the only helpful diagnostic tool and should be considered early in the evaluation of this kind of patients. The mechanism of migration of the cuff and the operative technique are discussed.
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keywords = operative
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16/61. Urethral erosion of a tension-free vaginal tape.

    BACKGROUND: Urethral dilation has been recommended to treat voiding dysfunction that may occur after placement of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. We report on a case of urethral erosion by the tape secondary to repetitive urethral dilations after surgery. CASE: A urethral erosion by the tape was diagnosed by cystoscopy after three urethral dilations failed to resolve postoperative voiding dysfunction 8 weeks after the initial procedure. A partial tape revision with repair of the urethrotomy was performed, with resolution of the subject's voiding dysfunction. CONCLUSION: This report describes a potential complication of a recommended treatment for voiding dysfunction after placement of TVT.
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17/61. Low incidence of post-TVT genital prolapse.

    Tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) is a well established surgical procedure for the treatment of female urinary stress incontinence. The operation, described by Ulmsten in 1995, is based on a midurethral Prolene tape support. TVT is accepted as an easy-to-learn and safe, minimally invasive surgical technique. Postoperative genital prolapse has been described following the Burch technique, as well as other surgical methods for the correction of female stress urinary incontinence. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the occurrence of this specific complication in relation to TVT. Of 314 patients undergoing TVT and followed for up to 50 months only 1 suffered genital prolapse, with de novo grade 2 cystocele, rectocele and uterine prolapse, diagnosed 3 months after the operation. This is the first reported case of genital prolapse following TVT.
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18/61. Necrotizing fasciitis after tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) placement.

    A 62-year-old homemaker underwent an uneventful TVT (tension-free vaginal tape) procedure. Eleven days postoperatively she presented to the Emergency Department with agonizing low abdominal pain, elbow pain, fever, and drainage from her suprapubic puncture sites. Her evaluation was consistent with a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis and she was started on antibiotics and taken to surgery for exploration and debridement, where the diagnosis was confirmed. This is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis following TVT placement.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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19/61. 8-ply small intestinal submucosa tension-free sling: spectrum of postoperative inflammation.

    PURPOSE: We report a series of postoperative inflammatory reactions of a tension-free pubourethral sling procedure using an 8-ply small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and review the literature regarding inflammatory reactions with this material in genitourinary reconstruction. MATERIALS AND methods: Between August 2002 and June 2003, 6 of 10 patients treated for stress urinary incontinence with 8-ply SIS had postoperative inflammatory reactions. patients underwent a thorough evaluation, including history, physical examination and urodynamic studies, before surgical intervention. RESULTS: All patients presented with induration and erythema at the abdominal incision site(s) and pain 10 to 39 days postoperatively. Pelvic examinations were negative. In 3 patients the inflammatory reaction resolved with minimal or no intervention. Incision and drainage of a sterile abscess were required in 1 patient. Despite 7 days of prophylactic postoperative antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs, 2 patients had delayed inflammatory reactions. One patient had resolution with conservative treatment, while the other had an abscess that spontaneously drained. With short-term followup (mean 7 months, range 4 to 10), 8 patients are dry, 1 is improved and 1 is incontinent. CONCLUSIONS: While the results with the 8-ply SIS tension-free sling in the short term are encouraging, the additional morbidity is alarming and caution is warranted. It is essential that patients be made aware of potential risks and possible delayed presentation of morbidity with the use of this material. The human to 8-ply SIS interaction needs further investigation to ensure that long-term safety and efficacy will not be jeopardized. Until then we will continue to use other sling materials.
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ranking = 8
keywords = operative
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20/61. Foley balloon to tamponade bleeding in the retropubic space.

    BACKGROUND: hemorrhage from the retropubic space is a well-described complication of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure that can be difficult to control with conservative measures. CASE: A 40-year-old female patient underwent tension-free vaginal tape procedure to treat stress incontinence. The procedure was complicated by persistent intraoperative bleeding from the retropubic space. The hemorrhage was refractory to digital tamponade but was successfully controlled by tamponade with a Foley catheter. The catheter was inserted with use of the urology guide wire from the vagina along the path of the tunneler into the retropubic space and inflated, successfully controlling the hemorrhage. CONCLUSION: Persistent bleeding during tension-free vaginal tape procedure from the retropubic space can be controlled with a Foley catheter placed from the vagina into the space of Retzius.
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keywords = operative
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