Cases reported "Urinary Tract Infections"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/35. autonomic dysreflexia presenting as a severe headache.

    hypertension, bradycardia, and severe headache have been associated with autonomic dysreflexia. autonomic dysreflexia affects those with spinal transection above the level of T6 after plastic changes of the afferent pathways. This restructuring in the presence of noxious stimuli below the level of the lesion leads to autonomic dysreflexia. The onset of the first episode of autonomic dysreflexia has been documented as soon as 30 days and as late as 13 years after the injury. This report presents a case study of a paraplegic man 8 years after injury with autonomic dysreflexia associated with a urinary tract infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = autonomic dysreflexia, dysreflexia, spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/35. cauda equina syndrome due to lumbosacral arachnoid cysts in children.

    We describe the clinical, neuroradiological and surgical aspects of two children in whom symptoms attributable to cauda equina compression were caused by spinal arachnoid cysts. The first patient presented with recurrent urinary tract infections due to neurogenic bladder dysfunction, absent deep tendon reflexes and sensory deficit in the lower limbs. The second child presented with unstable gait as a result of weakness and diminished sensation in the lower extremities. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lumbosacral arachnoid cyst in both patients. During surgery the cysts were identified and excised. Two years after surgery, the sensory deficits of the first patient have disappeared and patellar and ankle reflexes can be elicited, but there is no improvement in bladder function. Neurological examination of the second patient was normal. We conclude that the diagnosis of cauda equina syndrome should prompt a vigorous search for its aetiology. Lumbosacral arachnoid cysts are a rare cause of cauda equina syndrome in children.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.8601576377982E-5
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/35. Bladder cancer arising in a spina bifida patient.

    We report the case of a 52-year-old patient with spina bifida, neurologic bladder, and a history of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) in whom a bladder cancer was incidentally discovered. Cytology, cystoscopy, and cystography showed nonspecific, extensive inflammatory lesions. Cystography demonstrated a complex of diverticulae and cellules. Pathologic examination of a diverticulectomy specimen revealed a grade III pT3b transitional and squamous cell carcinoma. Because of the similar disease causation (recurrent UTIs, stones, and indwelling catheterization), we suggest extension of the guidelines proposed for patients with spinal cord injuries (ie, annual serial bladder biopsies) to patients with nontraumatic neurogenic bladder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.8601576377982E-5
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/35. Fatal emphysematous pyelonephritis with gas in the spinal extradural space in a patient with diabetes.

    BACKGROUND: Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EP) is a rare but life-threatening condition of the upper urinary tract, characterized by the presence of gas in the renal parenchyma and perirenal space. The vast majority of patients with EP (90%) are known to have diabetes, with escherichia coli being the most common causative pathogen. CASE REPORT: We present a case of fatal bilateral EP in a patient with diabetes, with an unusual radiological finding of gas around the spinal cord and in the psoas muscle, with renal parenchymal sparing. Our case serves as an important reminder of this life threatening entity in diabetic patients, which is not well recognized by clinicians because of its rarity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00024300788188991
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/35. Neurological worsening due to infection from renal stones in a multiple sclerosis patient.

    Symptomatic bladder dysfunction occurs in the majority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Although guidelines have been established for diagnosis and management of bladder dysfunction in these patients, they are sometimes overlooked in the primary care setting, leading to severe, life threatening complications. A 64-year-old male with a 31-year history of spastic quadriparetic MS and neurogenic bladder dysfunction managed with an indwelling catheter, presented to the hospital with worsening neurological function. He had developed increased weakness and cognitive impairment several weeks after being treated for a urinary tract infection (UTI). He had become unable to perform any activities of daily living or drive his power wheelchair. After an extensive work-up, he was found to have a large (14 x 18 x 30 cm) retroperitoneal abscess and multiple renal stones, including a large obstructing calculus in the collecting system near the ureteropelvic junction, and he underwent nephrectomy and abscess drainage. Of note, he had been found to have multiple renal stones and hydronephrosis on renal ultrasound 3 years earlier, but he had received no treatment. Following drainage of the abscess, his upper extremity neurological function returned to baseline, his cognitive status improved, and he regained the ability to perform activities of daily living. patients with paralysis from MS, much like those with traumatic spinal cord injuries, are at grave risk of mortality and morbidity from undiagnosed and under-treated urinary complications. This case demonstrates that evaluation and appropriate treatment for complications of neurogenic bladder should be part of routine care for patients with MS. Current recommendations for evaluation and management of bladder dysfunction in patients with MS will be reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.8601576377982E-5
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/35. Current implications of drug resistance in spinal cord injury.

    A 54-yr-old man with C6 quadriplegia and a neurogenic bowel and bladder was evaluated for clearance of a urinary tract infection after treatment for organisms susceptible to the antibiotics used, and an organism resistant to all antibiotics on the panel grew on the initial follow-up urine culture. Multidrug-resistant organisms present increasing challenges and risks in the management of the neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury. In an effort to control and reduce the impact and risk associated with these organisms, management methods of the neurogenic bladder and infection control policies should be adjusted according to guidelines from the Centers for disease Control and related research; such policies could include surveillance for multidrug-resistant organisms and isolation of patients who test positive for these organisms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00024300788188991
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/35. Giant urinoma in spinal cord injury: report of two cases.

    BACKGROUND: A urinoma is a cyst formed by the extravasation of urine from any constituent of the urinary tract; that is, via the kidney, ureter, urinary bladder, or the urethra. It may vary in its site and size according to its etiology, the point of the extravasation, and its duration and time of diagnosis. It commonly is associated with obstruction of the lower urinary tract by an impacted urinary calculus. METHOD: case reports. FINDINGS: Two cases of fatal intra-abdominal urinomas in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). CONCLUSION: Complications of SCI place these patients at risk for the development of urinoma. risk is highest among individuals with recurrent urinary tract infection, stone disease, and obstructive uropathy. Providers need to be alert to this potentially curable condition that may be obscured by the paucity of intra-abdominal findings due to the nature of the spinal cord syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00029160945826789
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/35. Serious pyogenic spondylitis following vertebroplasty--a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: The aim of this case report is to examine the problem of serious pyogenic spondylitis that may follow vertebroplasty. OBJECTIVES: To report 1 case of serious pyogenic spondylitis caused by percutaneous vertebroplasty with polymethyl methacrylate. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Serious pyogenic spondylitis caused by percutaneous vertebroplasty with polymethyl methacrylate is a rare complication. We herein report a case of pyogenic spondylitis that occurred after the patient had undergone vertebroplasty. methods: A 78-year-old woman with a T12 osteoporotic compression fracture, and without a magnetic resonance imaging sign of infection, underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty using polymethyl methacrylate without complication. RESULTS.: About 1 month after the operation, the patient was readmitted because of severe backache, and the diagnosis of pyogenic spondylitis was made using radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging. Anterior inter-body fusion with a strut bone graft after debridement and posterior instrumentation were then performed. CONCLUSIONS: vertebroplasty should proceed under sterile conditions. Excluding the possibility of spinal infection before surgery and a detailed evaluation assuring that the patient is without systemic infectious disease before the vertebroplasty procedure is crucial.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.8601576377982E-5
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/35. Propriospinal myoclonus after treatment with ciprofloxacin.

    The clinical and electrophysiological features of a truncal myoclonus in a 55-year-old man are described. The electromyographic characteristics point toward propriospinal myoclonus. It is suggested that a myoclonic generator was released after use of ciprofloxacin, by antagonising the gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00024300788188991
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/35. meningitis in a newborn infant with urosepsis, negative blood cultures and initially normal cerebrospinal fluid findings.

    This case presentation supports the observation that initial cerebrospinal fluid findings can be normal in newborn infants with sepsis syndrome who then develop evidence for meningeal involvement. Therefore, if initial lumbar puncture results are negative, a repeat lumbar puncture is recommended to look for meningitis in newborns that are critically ill with sepsis syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00024300788188991
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Urinary Tract Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.