Cases reported "Urinary Tract Infections"

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1/7. Postoperative morganella morganii endophthalmitis associated with subclinical urinary tract infection.

    We report a case of morganella morganii acute endophthalmitis following clear corneal phacoemulsification cataract surgery in which a coincident asymptomatic chronic urinary tract infection was detected postoperatively. morganella morganii is a gram-negative bacillus that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract and is part of the normal fecal flora. It is an opportunistic pathogen usually encountered in postoperative and nosocomial settings, causing urinary tract and wound infections. Chronic urinary tract infection may be a risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. A dipstick urinalysis before elective cataract surgery in elderly patients with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections may be considered.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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2/7. Lactobacillus sepsis associated with probiotic therapy.

    Probiotic strains of lactobacilli are increasingly being used in clinical practice because of their many health benefits. Infections associated with probiotic strains of lactobacilli are extremely rare. We describe 2 patients who received probiotic lactobacilli and subsequently developed bacteremia and sepsis attributable to Lactobacillus species. Molecular dna fingerprinting analysis showed that the Lactobacillus strain isolated from blood samples was indistinguishable from the probiotic strain ingested by the patients. This report indicates, for the first time, that invasive disease can be associated with probiotic lactobacilli. This report should not discourage the appropriate use of Lactobacillus or other probiotic agents but should serve as a reminder that these agents can cause invasive disease in certain populations.
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ranking = 7
keywords = bacillus
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3/7. Infections due to corynebacterium group D2. Report of a case.

    corynebacterium group D2 is a gram-positive bacillus easily identified in clinical microbiology laboratories. However, this organism is often disregarded as a skin and mucous contaminant. The Spanish literature has recently described corynebacterium group D2 as a urinary pathogen in a specific patient population. We report a case of corynebacterium group D2 infection to illustrate the potential pathogenicity and clinical presentation of infection due to this organism in the united states.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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4/7. haemophilus influenzae infections in adults: report of nine cases and a review of the literature.

    haemophilus influenzae is an aerobic pleomorphic gram-negative coccobacillus that requires both X and V factors for growth. It grows poorly, if at all, on ordinary blood agar unless streaked with Staph. aureus. It grows well on chocolate agar. Because this medium is often not used in culturing specimens from adults and because the organism may be overgrown by other bacteria, the frequency of H. influenzae infections has undoubtedly been seriously underestimated. This is aggravated by the failure of many physicians to obtain blood cultures in suspected bacterial infections and the failure of many laboratories to subculture them routinely onto chocolate agar. H. influenzae, along with streptococcus pneumoniae, is a major factor in acute sinusitis. It is probably the most frequent etiologic agent of acute epiglottitis. It is probably a common, but commonly unrecognized, cause of bacterial pneumonia, where it has a distinctive appearance on Gram stain. It is unusual in adult meningitis, but should particularly be considered in alcoholics; in those with recent or remote head trauma, especially with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea; in patients with splenectomies and those with primary or secondary hypogammaglobulinemia. It may rarely cause a wide variety of other infections in adults, including purulent pericarditis, endocarditis, septic arthritis, obstetrical and gynecologic infections, urinary and biliary tract infections, and cellulitis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is somewhat capricious in part from the marked effect of inoculum size in some circumstances. in vitro and in vivo results support the use of ampicillin, unless the organism produces beta-lactamase. Alternatives in minor infections include tetracycline, erythromycin, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. For serious infections chloramphenicol is the best choice if the organism is ampicillin-resistant or the patient is penicillin-allergic.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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5/7. Intravaginal instillation of lactobacilli for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections.

    urinary tract infections remain a common problem, particularly in the female population. New methods are required to manage recurrent cystitis, and extensive research to date has suggested that restoration of the lactobacilli flora of the urogenital tract may prevent these infections. In this study, five females suffering from recurrent urinary tract infections were treated twice weekly with intravaginal and perineal implantation of lactobacillus casei GR-1. These organisms colonized the epithelium and prevented the emergence of coliform bacteria in most instances, but did not appear to affect enterococcal colonization. in vitro studies showed that L. casei GR-1 inhibited the growth of the coliforms but did not inhibit enterococci. Each of the five patients had infection-free periods ranging from 4 weeks to 6 months. The treatment was well tolerated, had no side effects, led to an improved well-being, and was preferred to antibiotic treatment by all of the patients. These human studies, albeit of a limited nature, are the first to examine the potential for lactobacillus therapy in the prevention of urinary tract infections. The results show that lactobacilli therapy, using carefully selected organisms to treat patients who are closely followed, may be effective in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bacillus
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6/7. Lactobacillus gasseri as the cause of septic urinary infection.

    A 66-year-old patient developed severe urinary stasis due to a concrement in his right ureter; foudroyant septicemia followed. Lactobacillus gasseri was grown from pyoid urine from the right renal pelvis and in two blood cultures, thus suggesting septic urinary infection caused by lactobacilli. The infection was cured by catheterisation of right ureter and antibiotic treatment with cefotaxime and amoxicillin. The concrement was removed by dissolution. Diabetes and urinary stasis appear to be the main predisposing factors for this exceptional case of septic urinary infection caused by L. gasseri.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bacillus
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7/7. Urinary tract infection caused by mycobacterium terrae complex.

    We describe a case of recurrent urinary tract infection caused by mycobacterium terrae complex in a patient with obstructive nephropathy. The mycobacterium was resistant to most antituberculosis drugs and despite its apparent clearance in the urine, the patient finally died of urinary sepsis caused by multiple bacterial pathogens.
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ranking = 1.947681065198
keywords = mycobacterium
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