Cases reported "Urination Disorders"

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1/36. Retrovesical desmoplastic small round cell tumor in a patient with urinary frequency.

    A 21-year-old man with urological symptoms was found to have a large abdominal tumor in the retrovesical space between the bladder and the rectosigmoid colon. Radiologic findings revealed little evidence confirming the diagnosis. A transrectal biopsy failed to disclose the histopathologic origin of the tumor. An exploratory laparotomy with a complete surgical resection was impossible, so a wedge biopsy was performed. Combined histologic and immunohistochemical findings revealed the features of desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT). Despite subsequent multi-agent chemotherapy, the patient died as a result of the growing tumor and liver metastasis. There have been only two prior reports of this neoplasm in the urological literature.
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2/36. Early-stage ovarian carcinoma presenting with irritative voiding symptoms and urge incontinence.

    The detection of ovarian cancer remains a major challenge for gynecologists, as the majority of cases are symptomatically silent until regional metastases or ascites have occurred. This report examines a case of early-stage ovarian adenocarcinoma presenting with irritative voiding symptoms and urge incontinence, all of which resolved fully following surgery. We also report on the frequency of lower urinary tract symptoms leading to the detection of early-stage ovarian cancer, within a cohort of 52 consecutive patients surgically treated at our institution. lower urinary tract symptoms may trigger the diagnosis of early ovarian cancer in up to 11% of surgically managed patients at our institution. To our knowledge there are no previous reports of early ovarian cancer causing transient irritative voiding symptoms or urge incontinence. This report highlights the importance of considering ovarian neoplasm as a relatively uncommon but critically important etiology accounting for these common female urologic complaints.
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3/36. Pseudomalignant spindle cell proliferation of the urinary bladder: an unusual cause of voiding symptoms in a young patient.

    A case of an unusually large pseudomalignant spindle-cell proliferation (or inflammatory pseudotumor) of the urinary bladder in a young man is presented. The only symptom was urinary frequency. The clinical and radiologic evaluation (ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) revealed a massive tumor (11 x 7.5 x 5.5 cm) arising from the bladder wall that was eventually resected without compromising bladder function. Although the histologic findings initially suggested a sarcoma, the immunohistochemical findings were consistent with that of an inflammatory pseudotumor. The patient remained asymptomatic, without evidence of recurrence, after 12 months of follow-up. awareness of this inflammatory pseudotumor and its immunophenotypic characteristics is important to avoid an erroneous diagnosis and unnecessarily aggressive therapy.
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4/36. leiomyoma of the urinary bladder: case report.

    A case of leiomyoma of urinary bladder, a rare benign tumour, is presented. The patient was a 42 year old female who presented with dysuria and frequency of micturition. The radiological features, diagnosis and management are discussed and the literature on this subject is briefly reviewed.
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5/36. Effects of pergolide on nocturia in Parkinson's disease: three female cases selected from over 400 patients.

    We started the subject screening from over 400 patients with Parkinson's disease using strict selection criteria to identify the patients with nocturia who would allow accurate and efficient evaluation of the pergolide effects. The subjects were confined to female patients to exclude patients with potential prostate hypertrophy. The patients treated with bromocriptine at 7.5-15 mg/day adjunctive to l-dopa were selected to replace bromocriptine with pergolide of the equivalent dosage approved in japan. The nocturia was defined as having more than two episodes of urination during sleep per night on average. The subjects received the urinary sediment test before and during the study for screening urinary tract infection and the study was discontinued when urinary tract infection was found. As a result, we identified total 11 patients with nocturia and three of those completed the 12-week study of switching dopamine agonist from bromocriptine to pergolide. We observed a decrease in nocturia frequency in all three patients, a decrease in irritative urinary symptoms in two and an improvement of sleep QOL in two. The effect of pergolide on nocturia was independent of improvement of parkinsonian symptoms, suggesting a distinct mechanism from that of anti-parkinsonian effects. Our study also suggests that switching from bromocriptine to pergolide improves nocturia, thereby improving sleep status of patients with Parkinson's disease.
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6/36. endometriosis presenting as a urethral diverticulum: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: pelvic pain is a common complaint among women of childbearing age. It has an extensive differential diagnosis that at times can make it difficult to determine its etiology. One must therefore rely on the characteristics of the physical examination, symptoms and imaging studies. However, in doing so, one should keep in mind that many diseases mimic one another. physicians must be careful not to fall into the trap of simply assigning a specific disease to a given group of symptoms. CASE: A 35-year-old woman, gravida 2, para 0020, presented to a clinic complaining of left lower abdominal pain. She had a history of dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, urinary frequency and numerous urinary tract infections. Previous laparoscopies had been negative for endometriosis. Physical examination demonstrated a 1.5-cm mass left of the midurethra. No pus was expressed through the urethra with cyst massage. Imaging showed a 1.1 x 1.1-cm lesion in the left posterolateral aspect of the urethra consistent with a urethral diverticulum. Uterine adenomyosis was also noted. Although clinical symptoms, physical examination and imaging suggested a urethral diverticulum, a vaginal endometriotic cyst was encountered at surgery. Pathologic evaluation of the surgically excised lesion revealed endometriosis, revealed endometriosis. CONCLUSION: In this case, clinical findings, location and imaging characteristics of a periurethral endometriotic lesion suggested a urethral diverticulum. endometriosis should be considered in patients with a history of pelvic pain who present with urinary frequency and a periurethral lesion.
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7/36. Topical application of the tricyclic antidepressant doxepin can reduce dysuria and frequency.

    The aim of this article is to highlight a novel treatment for the symptoms of chronic urethral and trigonal irritation. A patient with severe urethral hyperaesthesia who derived almost complete alleviation of symptoms with topical application of a tricyclic antidepressant cream is described. The possible modes of action of tricyclics when used via the topical route of administration are described. Topical application of a tricyclic antidepressant cream may alleviate the symptoms of urethral hyperaesthesia.
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8/36. cystitis glandularis in children.

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the characteristics of cystitis glandularis in children. patients AND methods: Three cases of cystitis glandularis in children are described, occurring in boys aged 9-13 years. The presenting symptoms were gross haematuria in the first patient and frequency and urgency in the second. The third patient was asymptomatic and the lesion appeared as a wide thickening of the bladder wall on follow-up ultrasonography for previous surgery. In all patients, a polypoid bladder mass was found at cystoscopy and diagnosed at histology. The endoscopic resection, with long-term antibiotic prophylaxis, was the treatment of choice, with no recurrence at 12-30 months of follow-up. CONCLUSION: cystitis glandularis has been rarely described in children, and is probably related to chronic or recurrent infections or an inflammatory reaction. Its potential premalignant significance is still the subject of debate.
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9/36. The use and rationale of selective alpha blockade in children with non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    INTRODUCTION: We present here a long-term observation of 2 children with a rare syndrome with a non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder dysfunction (Hinman's syndrome), and we investigated the safety and efficacy of long-term use of terazosine in association with prophylactic antibiotics, timed voiding and a bowel regimen. MATERIALS AND methods: Two children, 7 years-old (22 kg) and 11 years-old (36 kg) presented in 1997 to our pediatric urology clinic with symptoms of urgency, frequency, urge incontinence and nocturnal enuresis. Both children were placed in a regimen of terazosine (starting with 0.5 mg increasing until 2 mg). RESULTS: There were no significant side effects throughout the entire treatment. The first 7-year old boy however developed some dizziness when the dose of terazosine was increased to 2 mg (after 4 weeks of administrating 1 mg), and this disappeared immediately when the dosage was reduced back to 1 mg daily. The urgency symptoms improved in both boys after 3 weeks of 1 mg terazosine. The secondary enuresis in the 11 year-old boy resolved after 2 months of 2 mg terazosine. CONCLUSION: It is possible to say that the alpha-blocker medication, terazosine can be administered safely to children with a non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction, also known as the Hinman's syndrome. These results have shown that dysfunctional voiding, postvoiding residual and upper tract involvement can disappear over time when long term terazosine is given in combination with timed voiding, prophylactic antibiotic therapy and treatment of the associated constipation. Our observations also suggest a permanent effect after discontinuing the medication.
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10/36. Lower urinary tract function in patients with pituitary adenoma compressing hypothalamus.

    BACKGROUND: The micturition reflex is under the tonic influence of suprapontine structures including the anteromedial frontal cortex, basal ganglia, and hypothalamus. However, there have been few reports about the role of the hypothalamus on the lower urinary tract (LUT) function in humans. OBJECTIVE: To investigate LUT function in patients with pituitary adenomas. methods: Urodynamic studies were carried out in three patients with LUT symptoms who had pituitary adenomas extending upwards to the hypothalamus. RESULTS: All three male patients (age 28 to 62 years) developed LUT symptoms (urinary urgency and frequency (3); urinary incontinence (3); voiding difficulty and retention (2)) along with weight loss, psychiatric symptoms, unsteady gait, and/or visual disturbances. One had the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, but none had diabetes insipidus. Two had resection of the tumour and subsequent radiation therapy, but LUT dysfunction persisted. The third patient had partial resection of the tumour to ameliorate hydrocephalus. Urodynamic studies showed detrusor overactivity during the storage phase in all patients; during the voiding phase there was underactive detrusor in two and non-relaxing sphincter in one. CONCLUSIONS: Hypothalamic lesions can cause severe LUT dysfunction in both the storage and voiding phases of micturition. This may reflect the crucial role of the hypothalamus in regulating micturition in humans.
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