Cases reported "Urogenital Neoplasms"

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1/24. arsenic keratosis and pigmentation accompanied by multiple bowen's disease and genitourinary cancer in a psoriasis patient.

    We report a case of arsenic keratosis and pigmentation accompained by multiple bowen's disease and genitourinary cancer in a 64-year-old man. He was a psoriasis patient with a history of herbal medication for about thirty years. He showed multiple hyperkeratotic plaques on the bilateral palms, soles, and multiple, brownish, scaly, elevated papules on the back in addition to diffuse hyperpigmentation. biopsy confirmed arsenic keratosis and bowen's disease. Transitional cell carcinoma was also detected on his ureter and bladder during follow-up. The skin lesions were treated with topical 5-fluorouracil, etretinate, and excision with improvement.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cancer
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2/24. Contribution to the evaluation of operability limits of tumours.

    The case of a patient with cancer of the sigmoid is presented. Thanks to surgical procedures, radiological treatment and chemotherapy, his life was prolonged by 8 years. It is worth noting that the original tumour gave later distant metastases to the ureter, right kidney, bladder, intestines and lymph nodes.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = cancer
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3/24. Triple cancers in the urogenital area of a patient with aplastic anemia.

    Three epithelial neoplastic lesions, perineal Bowenoid papulosis, uterine cervical carcinoma, and bladder transitional cell carcinoma, which occurred in a mildly immunosuppressed patient who had aplastic anemia were studied for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. In the Bowenoid papulosis, HPV type 16 dna was identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by in situ hybridization (ISH). In contrast, in the uterine cervical carcinoma, HPV 16 was not detected, although possibly another unidentified type of HPV in the lesion was suggested by the ISH findings. In the bladder transitional cell carcinoma, neither papillomavirus genus-specific (PGS) antigen nor HPV dna was found.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = cancer
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4/24. Bone mineral density for patients with bone metastasis of prostate cancer: a preliminary report.

    patients with prostate cancer frequently have osseous metastases which are qualitatively assessed with bone scannings. We have studied the quantitative evaluation of skeletal diseases by measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar vertebrae and radius. Forty-four patients with prostate cancer, nine with non-prostatic urogenital cancer and 90 controls were entered in this study. Among the patients with prostate cancer, the values of BMD in the lumbar vertebrae were significantly higher in patients with osseous metastasis than in those without metastasis, whereas the values of BMD in the radius were insignificantly different. Most of the patients with high levels of BMD in the lumbar vertebrae had osseous metastatic disease with no relationship between BMD in the lumbar vertebrae and the radius. The values of BMD in the lumbar vertebrae where hot spot scans were observed were related to X-ray findings. The alterations of BMD levels in the lumbar vertebrae were quantitatively evaluable as responses to androgen deprivation therapy. Measurement of BMD is useful for the accurate diagnosis of osteosclerotic lesions. BMD measurements of the lumbar vertebrae compared with those in the radius were variable in individuals.
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ranking = 1.6
keywords = cancer
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5/24. Merkel cell carcinoma -- a rarity in the urogenital tract.

    BACKGROUND: Merkel cell carcinoma -- a rare, aggressive cancer of the skin integument - is being increasingly diagnosed but represents an absolute rarity in the urogenital tract. CASE REPORT: We report on a 70-year-old man who was referred to us with suspected testicular cancer. The pathology report revealed a metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma. Fulminant disease progression under chemo-therapy (regimen as for small cell lung cancer) resulted in death 5 months later. CONCLUSION: The patient described is considered to be the first to develop testicular metastasis derived from Merkel cell carcinoma. Besides neuroendocrine and epithelial antigen tests, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is a helpful diagnostic tool. New receptor-associated therapies may allow more effective and less toxic treatment modalities in the mostly elderly or immune deficient patients.
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ranking = 0.6
keywords = cancer
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6/24. A new familial cancer syndrome? A spectrum of malignant and benign tumors including retinoblastoma, carcinoma of the bladder and other genitourinary tumors, thyroid adenoma, and a probable case of multifocal osteosarcoma.

    An 11-year-old Caucasian girl who had been cured of bilateral retinoblastoma developed non-radiation-induced osteosarcoma in multiple sites of the extremities. Investigation of the medical histories of 36 of her family members through six generations revealed that 8 relatives on the maternal side (22%) had malignant tumors, predominately genitourinary carcinomas, 2(6%) had benign tumors only, and 2(6%) had both benign and malignant neoplasms. The histologic variety of these tumors, the predominance of genitourinary carcinoma, the higher than expected frequency of tumor appearance over six generations, and the occurrence of malignant tumors in direct lineage suggest that the case of retinoblastoma followed by osteosarcoma is part of a familial cancer syndrome.
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ranking = 1.9851201327366
keywords = neoplasm, cancer
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7/24. Differential diagnosis of genitourinary tumors using monoclonal antibodies to intermediate filament proteins.

    Definitive diagnosis of poorly differentiated and metastatic neoplasms may be impossible using conventional histologic criteria. Recent developments in cell biology and immunology now enable us to answer such difficult diagnostic problems. Several varieties of structural proteins can be identified in malignant cells using monoclonal antibodies. The composition of these proteins can yield information regarding the origin of a neoplasm. intermediate filaments are one such family of structural proteins. By characterization of these proteins, using a panel of monoclonal antibodies, poorly differentiated tumors may be definitively classified as carcinomas, sarcomas, lymphomas, or neural tumors. This approach to tumor diagnosis is now applicable to difficult problems in clinical urology.
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ranking = 1.9702402654732
keywords = neoplasm
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8/24. Acute myeloblastic leukemia following treatment for non-hematopoietic cancers: report of 19 cases and review of the literature.

    Nineteen patients are reported who developed acute myeloblastic leukemia following treatment for a variety of solid tumors, including seminoma (four cases), melanoma (one case), and cancer of the ovary (six cases), colon or rectum (three cases), bladder (two cases), cervix, endometrium, and larynx (one case each). There were nine men and ten women, with a median age of 49.8 years (range 29 to 75). The mean interval between the diagnosis of solid tumors and acute leukemia is 5.8 years. In two patients the two diseases occurred simultaneously or within six months of each other. One patient was treated only surgically. Eight patients were treated with radiotherapy, five with chemotherapy, and five received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. pancytopenia was commonly noted prior to the onset of leukemia with chromosomal abnormalities observed in four cases in which a karyotype was performed. Three patients achieved complete hematological remission following antileukemic therapy. One hundred and six additional patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms and acute leukemia are reviewed. Although acute leukemia may occur in a higher than expected frequency in patients with solid tumors because of a possible increased risk of a second neoplasm, it seems more likely that the acute leukemia is related to the radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy administered to treat the first neoplasm.
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ranking = 3.9553603982098
keywords = neoplasm, cancer
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9/24. sexuality and fertility in urologic cancer patients.

    With the advent of effective treatment for urologic cancer, the preservation of sexual function and fertility has become an important goal. Some cancer treatments damage the physiological systems involved in reproduction. All have a psychological impact on sexuality. For men with prostate cancer, current issues in sexual rehabilitation include the debate on nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy, the role of vascular damage in causing erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy, and the need for a better understanding of hormonal effects on central and peripheral mechanisms of sexual function. In the treatment of men and women with bladder cancer, the sexual function morbidity of radical cystectomy is described in data from prospective interview studies. Sexual desire and orgasm remain normal after surgery despite disruption of the genital vasocongestion accompanying sexual arousal. Long-term follow-up studies of testicular cancer patients suggest that some increase in sexual dysfunction does occur. infertility remains a concern for a subgroup of younger, childless men. Attempts to modify or eliminate retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy are discussed, as is recovery of spermatogenesis after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Sexual function in patients with penile, urethral, or renal cell carcinoma is briefly reviewed.
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ranking = 1.8
keywords = cancer
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10/24. Triple urogenital cancer in a patient with a history of heavy smoking who had been exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion.

    A survivor of the Hiroshima atomic bomb experienced triple cancer of the urogenital organs after a long history of heavy smoking. The cancers comprised a clear cell carcinoma of the right kidney, transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder, left ureter and left renal pelvis, and adenocarcinoma of the prostate.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = cancer
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