Cases reported "Urticaria"

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1/6. Hedgehog hives.

    BACKGROUND: hedgehogs are increasingly popular pets in the united states and europe. A number of infections may be acquired from these animals, and hedgehogs are possible hosts of parasites. However, to our knowledge there arc no previous reports of urticarial reactions to hedgehogs. OBSERVATIONS: We describe 3 patients who developed an acute, transient, urticarial reaction after contact with the extended spines of pet hedgehogs. One patient also developed a more prolonged reaction at the site of contact. Interestingly, all 3 patients had documented allergies to cats and/or dogs. The results of prick testing in 1 patient to an extract of hedgehog dander produced an immediate wheal-and-flare reaction. CONCLUSIONS: A variety of dermatologic disorders may be seen in handlers of hedgehogs. Due to the increasing popularity of these animals as pets, it is likely that these reactions will be noted more frequently by dermatologists. The presence of allergies to other pets may be predictive of hedgehog hives and further investigation of the cross reaction of various animal antigens may clarify this relationship.
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keywords = animal
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2/6. Allergic contact urticaria and rhinitis to roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in a hunter.

    Roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) is one of the most common game mammals in europe, where hundreds of thousands people are exposed to this animal. Despite this fact, we are aware of only two cases of allergy to roe deer published until recently, one case of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma and the second of contact urticaria. We describe another case with co-existing allergic contact urticaria and rhinitis in a 55-year old male professional hunter. The symptoms were provoked only by exposure to roe deer, and there were no other past or present allergic diseases. Specific IgE was found to following animal allergens: cow dander (CAP class 5), goat epithelium and horse dander (each CAP class 4), dog epithelium, dog dander and swine epithelium (each CAP class 2). Skin prick tests have shown positive reaction only to cow epithelium ( ). Because of lack of deer dander allergen for specific IgE and skin tests, we have confirmed the causal relationship between exposure to roe deer and allergy using the rub test with roe deer's fur. There was a clearly positive urticarial reaction on the patient's skin accompanied by nasal itch, sneezing and rhinorrhea. No reaction was seen in a control person. We surmise that the positive tests with cow epithelium seen in this patient may result from a cross-reactivity to deer allergens. We conclude that although occupational allergies to roe deer seem to be rare, such possibility should be always considered among people having contact with these animals.
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keywords = animal
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3/6. Selective allergy to sheep's and goat's milk proteins.

    BACKGROUND: Cow's milk proteins are amongst the most common causes of food allergy in infants, and caseins are probably the main allergens. The existence of a high degree of cross-reactivity between milk caseins from different animals has been reported. We describe a 2-year-old boy who experienced allergic reactions after eating and touching sheep's cheese, but who tolerated cow's milk and cow's milk dairy products. He had never ingested milk or milk derivatives from sheep or goat. methods: Skin prick tests were carried out using whey fractions of cow's milk, whole milk and casein from goat, sheep and cow. We also performed skin prick tests with enzymes used in cheese production. Prick-by-prick tests with cheese made from cow, sheep and goat and their corresponding whole milk were also performed. Total serum IgE and specific IgE to cow's milk proteins, whole cow's milk and sheep's milk were determined. Specific IgE against casein and whole milk from the three different species were determined by ELISA. Inhibition of IgE binding to bovine casein was tested for casein and whole milk from all three species. The proteins of three types of casein and whole milk from cow, sheep and goat were separated by SDS-PAGE and were incubated with the patient's serum. RESULTS: skin tests were positive to sheep's milk and goat and sheep casein and were negative to all cow's milk proteins and whole cow's and goat's milk. Prick-by-prick tests were positive to goat's and sheep's cheese and were negative to cow's cheese. In ELISA-inhibition, sheep's milk and goat and sheep casein were able to inhibit > 50 % of specific IgE binding to sheep casein. The results of immunoblotting showed that the patient's circulating IgEs recognized only one band in the lanes corresponding to sheep and goat casein. CONCLUSIONS: We report a patient with allergy to sheep's and goat's milk proteins but not to cow's milk proteins. sheep casein was probably the main allergen causing sensitization in this patient. The results suggest that sheep casein shows a high degree of cross-reactivity with goat casein but not with cow casein. Our patient presented allergic symptoms caused by sheep and goat milk and cheese proteins. However, he was able to tolerate cow's milk and cow's milk dairy products without any ill effects.
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keywords = animal
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4/6. Cutaneous allergy to human (recombinant dna) insulin.

    p6 report two cases of cutaneous allergy to human (recombinant dna) insulin. Each patient had a history of systemic allergic reactions to porcine insulin and was at least as reactive to human as to porcine insulin by end-point cutaneous titration. Both patients' insulin allergy was managed with animal insulins and both have done well. Our experience with these two patients indicates that human insulin (rDNA) should not be expected to be efficacious in all patients with systemic allergy to insulin.
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keywords = animal
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5/6. Tropical rat mite dermatitis. Report of six cases and review of mite infestations.

    Six cases of tropical rat mite (Ornithonyssus bacoti) dermatitis are presented. The patients experienced papular urticaria, and mites were found on and identified in several of the patients. The presence of rodents in or around the home was confirmed in most cases. The role of other parasitic mites found on bats, birds, and snakes is reviewed. The importance of obtaining a history of rodent activity or exposure to other animals is emphasized when considering the cause of arthropod bites.
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keywords = animal
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6/6. Occupational asthma caused by orangutan in a zoo animal handler.

    A zoo animal handler developed bronchial asthma for the first time from handling orangutans (pongo pygmaes). He had prior allergic reactions (rhinoconjunctivitis and urticarial rash), but no asthma, to deer and other hoofed animals in the zoo. In a worksite challenge, immediate and late onset of asthmatic symptoms and airflow obstruction were provoked by carrying a baby orangutan for about 20 minutes.
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keywords = animal
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