Cases reported "Urticaria"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/41. urticaria in a tattooed patient.

    We present a case of urticaria in a tattooed patient due to hypersensitivity to the cobalt chloride contained in the blue ink used for tattoo. The patch test with the series of International Contact dermatitis research Group was positive only for chloride cobalt. cobalt is believed to be responsible for contact urticaria through a non-immunological mechanism. On reviewing the literature we have found no report of contact urticaria to cobalt in tattooed patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/41. in vitro released interferon-gamma in the diagnosis of drug-induced anaphylaxis.

    A 17-year-old Japanese male was referred with acute urticaria and anaphylaxis after the administration of PL (salicylamide, acetaminophen, anhydrous caffeine and promethazine methylene disalicylate) and Bufferin (aspirin and dialminate) for headache and a high grade fever. The results of prick test, patch test and drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test with PL and Bufferin were all negative. The patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with or without PL for 72 hours, and the activity of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the culture supernatant was measured with EIA. A significantly high level of IFN-gamma was detected in PBMC from the patient, but very little in those from healthy control subjects with a history of exposure to PL. This finding may indicate the presence of drug-specific IFN-gamma producing T cells in patients with an anaphylactic shock reaction to medication. Assays that measure the drug-induced IFN-gamma production may thus be a useful diagnostic tool not only for identifying delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to drugs, but also for predicting anaphylactic shock reaction to drugs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/41. A case of jellyfish sting.

    Jellyfish sting may result in a wide range of symptoms from common erythematous urticarial eruptions to the rare box-jelly induced acute respiratory failure. In taiwan, with the increasing frequency of international travel, cases of jellyfish sting to foreigners are on the rise. We report a case of jellyfish sting with the rare presentation of painless contact dermatitis. A 38-y-o man accidentally stepped on a sea urchin with his right foot during scuba diving in a beach in thailand. Traditional therapy with vinegar was applied on the lesion. However, when he returned to taiwan, erythematous patches on the left thigh with linear radiations to the leg were discovered. The skin lesions had bizzare shapes and showed progressive change. No pain or numbness was noticed. Jellyfish stingwas suspected, topical medications were applied, and the patient recovered without complication. Jellyfish stings usually result in a painful erythematous eruption. In this case, though the lesion involved a large surface, there was no pain. delayed diagnosis of jellyfish sting was due to the atypical presentation and the physician's unfamiliarity to the Thai jellyfish sting. awareness to the wide spectrum of jellyfish sting symptoms should be promoted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0033727874143917
keywords = patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/41. Contact urticaria caused by heat-sensitive raw fish allergens.

    patients allergic to fish usually present with skin reactions after handling raw fish. Less frequently, these reactions are seen without symptoms after oral intake, often in chefs and food handlers. We have attempted to explain the skin selectivity of such reactions in a 36-year-old woman with contact urticaria after handling raw fish. We obtained aqueous extracts of raw and cooked fish (sole and hake) for in vivo (prick test) and in vitro (SDS-PAGE, IgE Immunoblot) tests. Prick-by-prick test, 20-min closed patch test, rub test with fresh and cooked fish (sole, hake and cod) and specific IgE (CAP-system) to sole, cod and hake were performed. The strength of positive reaction to raw fish was greater than to cooked fish on both prick and prick-by-prick testing. Rub tests showed positive responses only to raw fish. Specific IgEs to sole (45 KU/l), hake (66.9 KU/l) and cod (18.7 KU/l) were obtained. IgE immunoblot recognized 3 antigens of 25, 48, 56 kDa in raw sole and 1 of 42 kDa in raw hake extracts. No IgE binding was observed with the cooked extracts or control sera. Our findings strongly suggest a Type-I hypersensitivity to fish. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated a loss of specific IgE binding to cooked extracts. We have reported a case of contact urticaria caused by heat-sensitive raw-fish allergens in a patient who probably became sensitized via the cutaneous route.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/41. Allergic reactions to isosulfan blue during sentinel node biopsy--a common event.

    BACKGROUND: Sentinel lymph node (SLN) dissection in the management of high-risk melanoma and other cancers, such as breast cancer, has recently increased in use. The procedure identifies an SLN by intradermal or intraparenchymal injection of an isosulfan blue dye, a radiocolloid, or both around the primary malignancy. methods: At the time of selective SLN mapping, 3 to 5 mL of isosulfan blue was injected either intradermally or intraparenchymally around the primary malignancy. From October 1997 to May 2000, 267 patients underwent intraoperative lymphatic mapping with the use of both isosulfan 1% blue dye and radiocolloid injection. Five cases with adverse reactions to isosulfan blue were reviewed. RESULTS: We report 2 cases of anaphylaxis and 3 cases of "blue hives" after injection with isosulfan blue of 267 patients who had intraoperative lymphatic mapping by the procedure described above. The 2 patients with anaphylaxis experienced cardiovascular collapse, erythema, perioral edema, urticaria, and uvular edema. The blue hives in 3 patients resolved and transformed to blue patches during the course of the procedures. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of allergic reactions in our series was 2.0%. As physicians expand the role of SLN mapping, they should consider the use of histamine blockers as prophylaxis and have emergency treatment readily available to treat the life- threatening complication of anaphylactic reaction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0033727874143917
keywords = patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/41. Occupational contact urticaria caused by airborne methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride.

    Acid anhydrides are low-molecular weight chemicals known to cause respiratory irritancy and allergy. Skin allergy has on rare occasions been reported. A total of 3 subjects with occupational exposure to methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride (MHHPA) and hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) from an epoxy resin system were studied to evaluate the nature of their reported skin and nose complaints (work-related anamnesis, specific IgE, contact urticaria examinations, and ambient monitoring). Using a Pharmacia CAP system with a HHPA human serum albumin conjugate, specific IgE antibody was detected in serum from 1 (33.3%) out of the 3 workers. One unsensitized worker displayed nasal pain and rhinorrhea only when loading liquid epoxy resins into the pouring-machine (2.2 mg MHHPA/m3 and 1.2 mg HHPA/m3), probably being an irritant reaction. Two workers had work-related symptoms at relatively low levels of exposure (geometric mean 32-103 microg MHHPA/m3 and 18-59 microg HHPA/m3); one complained of only rhinitis, and the other was sensitized against HHPA and displayed both rhinitis and contact urticaria (the face and neck). The worker's skin symptoms were evidently due to airborne contact, since she had not had any skin contact with liquid epoxy resin or mixtures of MHHPA and HHPA. These urticaria symptoms were confirmed by a 20-min closed patch test for MHHPA, but not by that for HHPA. The causative agent was considered to be MHHPA, although the specific IgE determination to MHHPA was not performed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/41. Allergy to heparin: a new in vitro diagnostic technique.

    INTRODUCTION: Few descriptions of allergic reactions to heparin have been published, because these reactions are not well known, their prevalence is low and they are difficult to diagnose due to the lack of an in vitro test until now. We propose a new technique, the basophil activation test (BAT) for the diagnosis of these reactions. methods AND RESULTS: We performed in vivo and in vitro studies with heparin and its derivatives in two patients with heparin-induced acute urticaria. In both patients the results of prick tests with sodium and calcium heparin, enoxaparin and nadroparin with immediate reading were negative. Intradermal skin tests with immediate reading and reading at 48 and at 96 hours with calcium heparin, enoxaparin and nadroparin were positive in the immediate reading and after 48 hours in the first patient. The second patient showed positivity to nadroparin in the immediate reading. The same drugs were also tested using patch tests, with reading after 48 and 72 hours. The second patient showed positivity to nadroparin after 48 hours.The BAT was positive to enoxaparin in the first patient and revealed showed slight positivity to sodium heparin in the second patient. CONCLUSIONS: We consider the BAT to be a useful, safe and reliable test for the in vitro diagnosis of heparin allergy. This test avoids the use of provocation tests, which present a risk to the patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/41. Contact urticaria, allergic contact dermatitis, and photoallergic contact dermatitis from oxybenzone.

    There is little literature regarding conventional patch tests and photopatch tests to oxybenzone resulting in both immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. A patient was patch-tested and photopatch-tested to various sunscreen chemicals. Both immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions were observed with oxybenzone. The positive patch tests were also photoaccentuated. Oxybenzone, a common sunscreen allergen, can result in both contact urticaria and delayed-type hypersensitivity on both conventional patch testing and photopatch testing. Allergic contact dermatitis to sunscreen chemicals has traditionally included contact urticaria, allergic contact dermatitis, and photoallergic contact dermatitis. Due to the recognition of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and its esters as sensitizers, the presence of benzophenones in "PABA-free" sunscreens has become more prevalent, especially in sunscreens with a sun protection factor (SPF) greater than 8. In our patient, immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions were seen to oxybenzone (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2-benzoyl-5-methoxyphenol, benzophenone-3, Eusolex 4360, Escalol 567, EUSORB 228, Spectra-Sorb UV-9, Uvinul M-40) upon conventional patch testing and photopatch testing.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.0067455748288
keywords = patch test, patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/41. A new case of occupational asthma from reactive dyes with severe anaphylactic response to the specific challenge.

    A case of occupational asthma in a wool and cotton dyer handling reactive dyes is described. The patient was skin positive, but asymptomatic to house dust mites. A bromoacrilamidic dye (Lanasol Yellow 4G) has been identified through chamber inhalation challenge as being responsible for the sensitization. A very short (4-minute) exposure produced a severe immediate obstructive ventilatory defect followed by arterial hypotension and urticaria. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness as tested through metacholine challenge was absent both in basal conditions and after the dye challenge. Both prick and patch test for the dye were positive in the absence of any sign of contact dermatitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/41. Contact urticaria from Emla cream.

    We report the first case of immediate-type hypersensitivity caused by Emla cream. A 55-year-old woman, after using Emla cream, went on to develop urticaria. An open test was positive to Emla cream. patch tests and prick tests were performed with Emla cream, the components of Emla cream (lidocaine, prilocaine and castor oil) and other local anaesthetics. The patch test with lidocaine and the prick test with Emla cream were both positive. An intradermal test and subcutaneous administration of 3 anaesthetics that had negative patch tests and prick tests were performed and well tolerated, allowing their use. In the literature, anaphylactic reactions to lidocaine injections, delayed-type hypersensitivity after lidocaine subcutaneous injections and contact dermatitis from Emla cream have all been described. This first case of contact urticaria from Emla cream was due to lidocaine and did not show any cross-reaction with other local anaesthetics.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = patch test, patch
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Urticaria'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.