Cases reported "Uterine Neoplasms"

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1/99. Trousseau's syndrome with brachiocephalic vein thrombosis in a patient with uterine carcinosarcoma. A case report.

    The authors treated a patient with the previously unreported occurrence of brachiocephalic vein and superior vena cava thrombosis in association with a distantly located cancer. A 71-year-old woman presented with swelling over the right side of the neck and abdominal distension. physical examination revealed a huge mass, and computed tomography demonstrated thrombosis of the brachiocephalic vein and superior vena cava accompanied by jugular vein dilatation. No coagulation disorder was demonstrable. After anticoagulation and thrombolysis, hysterectomy was performed; microscopic examination of the specimen revealed uterine carcinosarcoma. Even though local tumor obstruction is a much more common cause of neck vein thrombosis, a distant occult cancer can present as this form of Trousseau's syndrome. In patients with otherwise unexplained neck vein thrombosis, examination not only of the head and neck but also of the abdomen and pelvis should be pursued.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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2/99. The use of patient-controlled boluses of local anaesthetic via a psoas sheath catheter in the management of malignant pain.

    patients who develop malignant infiltration of the psoas muscle and the lumbar plexus often experience a severe complex pain syndrome characterised by deep somatic pain, neuropathic pain and psoas spasm. Conventional analgesic regimes may not relieve these symptoms adequately. We describe the use of patient-controlled boluses of local anaesthetic via a psoas sheath catheter in this scenario. The recent availability of portable infusion pumps with the capability to deliver large volume boluses with long lockout times made this intervention possible and allowed the patient to be discharged home with effective relief of pain.
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ranking = 0.0020773507057079
keywords = deep
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3/99. Effectiveness of an inferior vena caval filter as a preventive measure against pulmonary thromboembolism after abdominal surgery.

    In three patients with a previous history of pulmonary thromboembolism, inferior vena caval filters were inserted before elective laparotomies to prevent a recurrent pulmonary thromboembolism. Two patients had colon cancer and underwent colectomies, while the other had myoma uteri, which might have been the cause of deep vein thrombosis, and thus a hysterectomy was performed. In spite of their poor risks, their postoperative courses were fairly good owing to perioperative management including anticoagulant therapy, and no recurrence has been observed since the operation in every case. A pulmonary thromboembolism is a fatal complication which follows deep vein thromboses. In patients with such a previous history, the risk is much higher after a laparotomy because of long-term bed rest, hypercoagulability, and so on. The mortality rate after a recurrence of pulmonary thromboembolism is reported to reach 30% without adequate therapy, whereas it is reduced to 8% with anticoagulant therapy, and to 0.8% with additional inferior vena caval filter placement. Considering the feasibility of insertion and the low incidence of complications, preoperative inferior vena caval filter placement is thus recommended for patients having a previous history of either pulmonary thromboembolism or deep vein thrombosis.
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ranking = 1.1530837197751
keywords = deep vein thrombosis, deep vein, thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein, deep
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4/99. Successful one-stage resection of intravenous leiomyomatosis of the uterus with extension into the heart.

    Intravenous leiomyomatosis of the uterus is a rare neoplasm characterized by nodular masses of benign smooth muscles with intraluminal growth to the inferior vena cava and, in some cases, to the heart. It may cause abdominal and cardiovascular symptoms and is a serious risk of death when it reaches the tricuspid valve. Surgery is the best treatment and must be applied as soon as possible using cardiopulmonary bypass. The authors report a new case that had cardiac involvement and was successfully resected. The symptoms, imaging diagnosis, pathological and histopathological findings, tumors that mismatched the intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL), and the use of circulatory arrest and deep hypothermia are discussed. A review of the literature is included.
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ranking = 0.0020773507057079
keywords = deep
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5/99. recurrence of uterine intravenous leiomyomatosis with intracardiac extension. Diagnostic considerations and surgical removal.

    A 28-year-old woman (gravida 2, para 2) was admitted 20 months after a hysterectomy because of fibromyoma. The hysterectomy specimen had shown intravenous leiomyomatosis. The patient presented with unspecific abdominal symptoms, serologic signs of hepatic and renal failure and clinical right-sided heart failure. Progression despite treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue promoted transferral to the present centre. Abdominal ultrasonography, phlebography and transoesophageal echocardiography showed a left pelvic mass and a seemingly free-floating tumour extending from the left main iliac vein via the inferior caval vein to the right ventricle. During a combined cardiac and distal caval approach using extracorporeal circulation, a 45 cm massive leiomyoma was removed successfully. Seven weeks later the left pelvic tumour was removed radically together with left oophorectomy. At control 12 months later the patient was well and without any remaining symptoms.
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ranking = 0.013601551835929
keywords = vein
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6/99. hemoperitoneum from spontaneous bleeding of a uterine leiomyoma: a case report.

    Bleeding from uterine leiomyoma is a rare cause of hemoperitoneum. In most cases bleeding is a result of trauma or torsion. Spontaneous rupture of a superficial vein is extremely rare. Fewer than 100 cases have been reported. Our patient is a 44-year-old black woman who presented in the emergency room with acute onset of epigastric pain. Past medical and surgical history was not contributory except for a uterine "fibroid." In the emergency room, the patient's abdomen became diffusely tender. Her pregnancy test was negative, and the abdominal ultrasound showed fluid in the peritoneal cavity. The patient became hemodynamically unstable, and there was a significant drop of the hemoglobin/hematocrit. A surgical consultation was requested, and the patient underwent exploratory laparotomy. A subserosal uterine leiomyoma was found, with an actively bleeding vein on its dome. The leiomyoma was excised and 3 liters of blood and blood clots were evacuated from the peritoneal cavity. The patient was premenopausal and had a known leiomyoma. The clinical course was similar to that of previously reported cases. Although extremely rare, when there is no history of trauma, pregnancy, or other findings, spontaneous bleeding from uterine leiomyoma should be in the differential diagnosis. Emergent surgical intervention is recommended to establish the diagnosis and stop the hemorrhage.
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ranking = 0.013601551835929
keywords = vein
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7/99. Intracardiac extension of intravenous leiomyomatosis in a pregnant woman: A case report and review of the literature.

    Intravenous leiomyomatosis is an uncommon clinical entity characterized by the growth of a benign, smooth muscle tumour within the venous system. Intracardiac extension of this tumour is rare, and approximately 35 cases have been reported in the literature. The second case of massive intracardiac extension of intravenous leiomyomatosis is reported in a pregnant patient diagnosed after the unusual presentation of seizure activity. Tumours were successfully removed from the right internal iliac vein, inferior vena cava, and right atrium and ventricle in a single-stage operation using cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest. Concomitant total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed. Nine months after diagnosis, the patient was evaluated for recurrent disease. A review of the literature from 1994 to 1998 is presented.
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ranking = 0.0068007759179643
keywords = vein
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8/99. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism associated with a huge uterine myoma--a case report.

    A 51-year-old woman with a large uterine myoma suffered from acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Venography revealed thrombosis in the right common iliac vein and almost complete obstruction of the left common iliac vein. The ascending lumbar vein showed collateral drainage. Treatment was initiated with continuous intravenous heparin sodium, and a Greenfield filter was inserted to prevent the extension of the pulmonary embolism during and after hysterectomy. After a total hysterectomy, venography revealed restoration of patency in the bilateral common iliac veins, and no flow was seen in the ascending lumbar vein. Thorough clinical examinations failed to identify any other prothrombotic conditions. These results suggest that a large uterine myoma compressed veins in the pelvis, and the resulting impaired blood flow caused deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism.
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ranking = 0.81231760414908
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis, vein, deep
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9/99. Unusual abdominal tumors with intracardiac extension. Two cases with successful surgical resection.

    Abdominal tumors that can grow through vascular lumen and spread to the right heart are rare. Although these tumors have different histologic aspects, they may cause similar abdominal and cardiac symptoms and are a serious risk factor for pulmonary embolism and sudden death when they reach the right atrium and tricuspid valve. The best treatment is radical surgical resection of the entire tumor using cardiopulmonary bypass with or without deep hypothermia and total circulatory arrest. We report the cases of two patients, the first with leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava and the other with intravenous leiomyomatosis of the uterus that showed intravascular growth up to right atrium and ventricle, who underwent successful radical resection in a one-stage procedure with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. We discuss the clinical and histologic aspects and imaging diagnosis and review the literature.
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ranking = 0.0020773507057079
keywords = deep
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10/99. Pathologic features of uterine leiomyomas following uterine artery embolization.

    Bilateral uterine artery embolization has recently been employed as an alternative to operational treatment of uterine leiomyomas. The pathologic features induced by uterine artery embolization have not been previously described in detail. Usually patients experience symptomatic improvement with a reduction in size of the leiomyomas. This report describes the pathologic features in a series of 10 uterine leiomyomas where tissue was available for histologic examination following uterine artery embolization. Characteristic histologic features within the leiomyomas included massive necrosis, sometimes with dystrophic calcification, vascular thrombosis, and intravascular foreign material that elicited a histiocytic and foreign-body giant cell reaction. In some cases, intravascular foreign material was present elsewhere in the myometrium, the cervix, or paraovarian region. In occasional cases, there were foci of myometrial necrosis and microabscess formation beyond the confines of the leiomyomas. Foci of extrauterine inflammation were also occasionally identified. Histopathologists should be aware of these findings because the use of uterine artery embolization will possibly become more widespread in the future.
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ranking = 0.10301464042478
keywords = thrombosis
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