Cases reported "Uterine Rupture"

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1/34. Primary repair of cornual rupture occurring at 21 weeks gestation and successful pregnancy outcome.

    The successful delivery in a 31 year old woman at 33 weeks gestation is reported, after repair to a cornual rupture which occurred at 21 weeks gestation. The patient exhibited acute abdominal pain and pending shock. Emergency laparotomy showed a cornual rupture and an intrauterine vital fetus having intact amnion membrane. On the patient's family's insistence, primary repair for a cornual rupture was performed and preservation of the fetus attempted. Postoperatively, tocolytic agent with ritodrine hydrochloride was administered and close follow-up of the patient was uneventful. The patient had a smooth obstetric course until 33 weeks gestation when premature rupture of the membranes occurred, soon followed by the onset of labour. She underwent an elective Caesarean section and delivered a normal male fetus weighing 2140 g with Apgar scores at 1, 5 and 10 min of 6, 8, and 9 respectively. Because of this successful outcome, we suggest that primary repair for such an unusual patient should be accepted.
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2/34. Extrauterine pregnancy resulting from early uterine rupture.

    BACKGROUND: Cesarean scar rupture of a gravid uterus in early gestation is rare. CASE: A 38-year-old woman, gravida 4, para 2-0-1-1, presented at 13 weeks' gestation with cramping and spotting. She had a history of two cesareans. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging indicated probable uterine dehiscence and a viable extrauterine pregnancy. After embolization of the uterine arteries with subsequent fetal death, the subject had a hysterectomy. Intraoperatively, she had complete rupture of the lower uterine segment, but the pregnancy was enclosed within scar tissue between the uterus and bladder. Placenta percreta was found by histologic examination. CONCLUSION: women with histories of cesareans might be at risk of early uterine rupture.
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3/34. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of uterine rupture following open fetal surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Reported cases of uterine rupture diagnosed by ultrasound have shown fetal membranes ballooning through uterine rupture sites, or adjacent areas of hemorrhage. CASE: A 27-year-old gravida 3, para 2 had open fetal surgery to repair a fetal myelomeningocele at 28 weeks' gestation. Her postoperative course was complicated by threatened preterm labor and anhydramnios. At 33 weeks' gestation, with maternal symptoms of bowel obstruction, ultrasound showed a fetal leg and section of umbilical cord protruding through the uterine wall. CONCLUSION: Even in the presence of anhydramnios, uterine wall rupture was identified, because ultrasound evaluation of the uterine wall showed prolapsed fetal parts and umbilical cord. Persistent anhydramnios after open fetal surgery should prompt a search for uterine rupture.
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4/34. Fetal survival despite unrecognized uterine rupture resulting from previous unknown corporeal scar.

    Cesarean scar rupture of a gravid uterus with unknown corporeal scar is common. Our case was a 35 year woman, gravida 2, para 1 presented at 38 weeks gestation. She was admitted to our hospital for routine follow up. She had no signs or symptoms of labor. However eight hours after the initial examination, she came back to hospital with the signs of shock and acute abdomen. Immediately she was referred to surgery. Intraoperatively a complete rupture of the classical corporeal incision was observed, but the fetus was enclosed within the anterior lying plasenta. The fetus was delivered with one minute apgar score 3, and five minute apgar score 8. According to this case, we conclude that spontaneous uterine rupture of the classical uterine scar can be observed even without uterine contractions. So women with the possibility of previous classical uterine incision should be delivered once fetal maturity is documented.
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5/34. uterine rupture in an unscarred uterus after application of fundal pressure. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Rupture of an unscarred uterus is rare, with a reported incidence of 1 in 8,000-15,000 pregnancies. We report a case occurring during labor. CASE: A 33-year-old woman, gravida 3, para 0, abortion 2, was admitted at 40 weeks' gestation with ruptured membranes. Fundal pressure was applied during delivery due to maternal exhaustion. uterine rupture was diagnosed from palpation of the fetal extremities coupled with a decreased fetal heartbeat. A 6-cm transverse laceration was discovered over the lower uterine segment during emergency cesarean section. The uterus was sutured. There were no further complications, and the postoperative course was uneventful. CONCLUSION: Spontaneous rupture of the unscarred uterus during labor is rare, with only one case recorded at our institution over a 10-year period. risk factors include weakness of the uterine muscle and the application of fundal pressure. Early detection and immediate surgical intervention are the mainstays of management.
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6/34. Combined cornual pregnancy and intrauterine twin pregnancy after in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer: report of a case.

    A case of combined cornual pregnancy and intrauterine twin pregnancy after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and transfer of six embryos is presented. The case was diagnosed as intrauterine triplets ultrasonographically at seven weeks of gestation. Unfortunately, the patient suffered from severe lower abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock at 10 weeks of gestation, and an emergent laparotomy was done. During the operation, a ruptured cornual pregnancy with accompanying hemoperitoneum was found. Because fetal heart beats were not detected by intraoperative ultrasonography in the other two intrauterine fetuses, evacuation of the gestational contents through the uterine defect was done, and the rupture site was repaired. The incidence, mechanism and management of heterotopic pregnancies after in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer are discussed.
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7/34. Conservative management of spontaneous uterine perforation associated with placenta accreta: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: placenta accreta occurring in an unscarred uterus is exceedingly rare. Previous cases of spontaneous uterine perforation associated with placenta accreta were treated with hysterectomy. CASE: A nulliparous woman was clinically diagnosed with placenta accreta when spontaneous vaginal delivery was complicated by postpartum hemorrhage and a retained placenta. magnetic resonance imaging subsequently revealed focal areas of placenta accreta. Acute-onset abdominal pain and cul-de-sac fluid prompted diagnostic laparoscopy, which revealed a spontaneous uterine perforation in the right posterior-lateral aspect of the uterus. This area was oversewn, and the patient received 2 weeks of postoperative antibiotics because of enterococcus faecalis bacteremia. CONCLUSION: Spontaneous uterine perforation associated with placenta accreta can be managed conservatively.
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8/34. Heterotopic pregnancy after in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

    OBJECTIVE: A ruptured cornual pregnancy is a rare and challenging problem. We present two cases of cornual pregnancies after in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) treated by cornual resection, with an excellent perinatal outcome for the intrauterine pregnancy in both cases. A literature review of cornual pregnancy after IVF-ET is also included. case reports: Two women had undergone IVF-ET because of tubal problems. Emergent laparotomy was performed because of internal bleeding at 12 weeks of gestation in one case and 17 weeks in the other, and in both cases, ruptured cornual pregnancies were found. Cornual resection and primary repair were performed. The women were discharged on the 6th and 7th postoperative day, respectively, and they underwent an elective cesarean delivery at 37 weeks of pregnancy. They were delivered of healthy babies, one weighing 2700 g and the other 2310 g. CONCLUSION: These cases illustrate that good perinatal outcomes can be achieved by surgical intervention in heterotopic pregnancies, even in the event of a ruptured cornu.
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9/34. Spontaneous midtrimester uterine rupture: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Spontaneous mid trimester rupture of the uterus is uncommon. AIM: To report a case of spontaneous mid trimester uterine rupture in a patient with a previous caesarean section scar. METHOD: A review of the case record of a patient managed for spontaneous mid-trimester uterine rupture and the relevant literature. RESULTS: A 30-year old unbooked gravida 6, para 1( 4) house wife with a previous caesarean section scar presented with features of an acute surgical abdomen with hypovolaemic shock at 24 weeks gestation. She had an emergency laparotomy at which she was noted to have a uterine rupture. She had a repair of the uterus and bilateral tubal ligation. Her post operative state was uneventful. CONCLUSION: There should be a high index of suspicion of uterine rupture in a gravid woman with a previous uterine scar presenting with abdominal pain and shock.
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10/34. Conservative management of vesicouterine fistula after uterine rupture.

    We report the closure of a vesicouterine fistula with conservative management utilizing an indwelling transurethral Foley catheter. uterine rupture occurred during a trial of vaginal birth after cesarean section, necessitating an emergency cesarean section. Upon entry into the abdomen, the base of the bladder was noted to be involved in the uterine rupture. The bladder trigone and ureteral orifices appeared normal. A primary, two-layer bladder repair was performed. A cystogram on postoperative day 14 demonstrated a vesicouterine fistula. Conservative management involving bladder drainage for 21 days with a transurethral Foley catheter was successful in closure of the fistula.Vesicouterine fistula, a documented complication of uterine rupture due to attempted vaginal birth after previous cesarean section, can spontaneously resolve with conservative management alone.
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