Cases reported "Uveal Diseases"

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1/45. ciliary body detachment caused by capsule contraction.

    A 74-year-old woman developed capsule contraction associated with hypotony and choroidal effusion 18 months after uneventful phacoemulsification with 3-piece poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens implantation. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed ciliary body detachment and stretched zonules. A radial neodymium: YAG anterior capsulotomy was performed, resulting in the resolution of the ciliary body detachment and choroidal effusion as well as in normal intraocular pressure over 4 days.
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ranking = 1
keywords = effusion
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2/45. Sclerotomy in uveal effusion syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To report visual and anatomic outcomes after modified scleral surgery in patients with uveal effusion syndrome with retinal and choroidal detachment. methods: In five eyes of four patients with retinal and choroidal detachment and uveal effusion syndrome due to nanophthalmos, we performed pars plana full-thickness unsutured sclerotomies without sclerectomy. RESULTS: In all cases, uveal effusion with choroidal and retinal detachment resolved within 3 weeks, and all patients showed improved vision. The functional and anatomic results remained stable for over 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: Uveal effusion syndrome that is refractory to medical treatment (high-dose systemic corticosteroids) can be managed effectively by pars plana full-thickness unsutured sclerotomy without sclerectomy.
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ranking = 4
keywords = effusion
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3/45. Choroidal effusions and hypotony caused by severe anterior lens capsule contraction after cataract surgery.

    PURPOSE: To report the clinical features and management of two patients with pseudophakic anterior capsule contraction with secondary tractional ciliary body detachments and hypotonous choroidal effusions. methods: case reports. RESULTS: In two eyes of two patients with pseudophakia, severe anterior lens capsule contraction and tractional ciliary body detachments, anterior capsulotomy (one Nd:YAG laser, one surgical), was followed by resolution of the ocular hypotony and resolution/nonrecurrence of the choroidal effusions. In both cases, continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis was used during cataract surgery. CONCLUSION: Anterior capsule contraction following pseudophakia may result in tractional ciliary detachment and secondary ocular hypotony. Radial anterior capsulotomy appeared to be effective in both cases.
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ranking = 3
keywords = effusion
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4/45. Bilateral uveal effusion associated with scleral thickening due to amyloidosis.

    A 45-year-old man with primary systemic amyloidosis was found to have bilateral uveal effusions secondary to thickened sclera according to magnetic resonance imaging of the orbits. The patient was treated with bilateral sclerectomies and vortex vein decompression, and had an excellent outcome. light microscopy of excised sclera revealed severe infiltration of the tissue by amyloid. To our knowledge, this is the first report of amyloid infiltration of the sclera leading to uveal effusion. Arch Ophthalmol. 2000;118:1293-1295
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ranking = 3
keywords = effusion
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5/45. Angle-closure glaucoma in nanophthalmos.

    Two patients had nanophthalmos with uveal effusion and angle-closure glaucoma. They were treated with a method based on the use of the laser, not only to perform iridotomy but to shrink the iris stroma, which appears to open the anterior chamber angle even without iridotomy. Additionally, we introduced three factors that may be diagnostic of nanophthalmos.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = effusion
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6/45. Angle-closure glaucoma in association with orbital pseudotumor.

    PURPOSE: To describe the pathophysiology of angle-closure glaucoma secondary to idiopathic inflammatory orbital pseudotumor. DESIGN: Retrospective, small noncomparative case series. PARTICIPANTS: Three patients with angle-closure glaucoma and orbital pseudotumor. methods: The pathophysiology of this entity was investigated using magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES: Clinical features, anterior chamber angle configuration, and intraocular pressure. RESULTS: Angle closure from anterior rotation of the ciliary body caused by choroidal effusions secondary to pseudotumor was demonstrated using MRI and UBM. Two of the three cases resolved after treatment for orbital pseudotumor. CONCLUSIONS: Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor is a cause of secondary angle-closure glaucoma. The mechanism of angle closure is anterior rotation of the ciliary body secondary to choroidal effusions resulting from the orbital inflammation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = effusion
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7/45. Pathogenesis of transient high myopia after blunt eye trauma.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the pathogenesis of transient high myopia after blunt eye trauma. DESIGN: Two observational case reports and literature review. methods: Refraction was measured in two patients with an autorefractometer in the acute and convalescent stages after a blunt eye injury. The anterior chamber angle, the ciliary body, and the choroid were examined by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) in the acute and convalescent stages. In one patient, the anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, and axial length were measured by A-scan ultrasonography in the acute and convalescent stages. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of the refraction, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, axial length, and the UBM-determined appearance of the choroid and ciliary body during the acute stage with the values during the convalescent stages. RESULTS: The first patient showed a myopic shift of -9.75 diopters (D) and an anterior chamber shallowing of 0.94 mm measured 3 days after trauma by an air bag inflation compared with the measurements at the convalescent phase. UBM showed an annular ciliochoroidal effusion with ciliary body edema, anterior rotation of the ciliary processes, and disappearance of the ciliary sulcus. Eleven days after the injury, these UBM findings normalized, and the myopia decreased to -0.75 D, 27 days after trauma. The second patient had a myopic shift of -8.9 D compared with the convalescent phase, immediately after blunt trauma by a firework. Seven days after the injury, UBM revealed a partial cyclodialysis in addition to findings similar to those in the first patient. Ten days after injury, a myopic shift (-4.75 D), anterior chamber shallowing (by 1.1 mm), and thickening of the crystalline lens (by 0.27 mm) were observed compared with the convalescent phase. Associated UBM findings confirmed the anterior shift of the lens-iris diaphragm. Seventeen days after trauma, the UBM findings, including the cyclodialysis, were normalized, and the myopia had decreased to -1.0 D. CONCLUSIONS: Transient high myopia after blunt trauma is caused by anatomic changes in the ciliary body and crystalline lens. The anterior shift of the lens-iris diaphragm caused by ciliochoroidal effusion with ciliary body edema and thickening of the crystalline lens from blunt eye trauma are involved in traumatic high myopia.
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ranking = 1
keywords = effusion
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8/45. Uveal effusion and ultrasonic imaging: a clinical series.

    PURPOSE: To establish the diagnostic role of imaging by ultrasound for the diagnosis of uveal effusion syndrome. methods: Using ultrasonic imaging features as the main criteria for evaluation, the recorded data from 16 patients with presumed uveal effusion seen between 1994 and 2000 were reviewed and analysed for clinical manifestations and current diagnostic suggestions. Eventually, as cumulating experience suggested that ultrasound is capable of indicating uveal effusion, the study set-up became in part more prospective. RESULTS: The two main ultrasonic features found were: (1) extended multi-layered detachment patterns by B-scan, often kinetically mobile; (2) a spongy oedematous ciliary body region, often with interstitial lacunae, as demonstrated by high-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy (50 Mhz). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with visual loss and ambiguous detachment-like fundus pathology, ultrasonic features are often of practical guidance for diagnosing uveal effusion syndrome.
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ranking = 4
keywords = effusion
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9/45. Nanophthalmos with uveal effusion. A new clinical entity.

    Five patients exhibited the association of nanophthalmos and uveal effusion, apparently on a familial basis. glaucoma, occurring in the fourth to sixth decades of life, required surgical intervention that was followed by the development of secondary retinal and choroidal detachment. Recognition of this syndrome is important because: (1) surgical procedures for glaucoma should be avoided, if possible, in order to prevent the development of uveal effusion; (2) retinal detachment surgical procedures are ineffective in uveal effusion and should be avoided, and (3) choroidal elevation occurring in the uveal effusion phase may be erroneously diagnosed as an intraocular tumor and unnecessary enucleation may follow.
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ranking = 4
keywords = effusion
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10/45. The indocyanine green findings in idiopathic uveal effusion syndrome.

    We report two cases clinically diagnosed as idiopathic uveal effusion syndrome, where indocyanine green angiogram suggest non-specific choroidal inflammation as the underlying cause. Treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was beneficial.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = effusion
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