Cases reported "Uveal Diseases"

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1/5. ciliary body detachment caused by capsule contraction.

    A 74-year-old woman developed capsule contraction associated with hypotony and choroidal effusion 18 months after uneventful phacoemulsification with 3-piece poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens implantation. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed ciliary body detachment and stretched zonules. A radial neodymium: YAG anterior capsulotomy was performed, resulting in the resolution of the ciliary body detachment and choroidal effusion as well as in normal intraocular pressure over 4 days.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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2/5. Expulsive hemorrhage before phacoemulsification.

    A 65-year-old white man who was scheduled for cataract extraction experienced a sudden increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) with flattening of the anterior chamber immediately after the anterior capsule incision. The eye was sutured, and because no decrease in pressure was noted, surgery was postponed. The presence of the cataract prevented ophthalmoscopic examination. Echographic examination revealed a hemorrhagic choroidal detachment with involvement of the ciliary body. The patient was examined regularly until the choroidal detachment disappeared 4 weeks later. He then had uneventful phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation.
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ranking = 5
keywords = phacoemulsification
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3/5. phacoemulsification, persistent hypotony, and cyclodialysis clefts.

    A retrospective noncomparative case-note analysis of 3 men presenting with persistent hypotony after routine phacoemulsification cataract surgery was performed. All patients had a previous history of significant blunt ocular trauma. All patients had surgical repair of the cyclodialysis clefts, 1 with cleft cryopexy and 2 with formal cleft closure with a limbal-based double scleral flap technique. All patients achieved closure of the cyclodialysis clefts following surgical intervention with complete resolution of hypotony. Mean preoperative intraocular pressures improved from 3, 4 and 3 mm Hg in the 3 cases to 11, 16, and 17 mm Hg postoperatively. Visual acuities improved from preoperative readings of counting fingers, 6/36 and 6/24 in the 3 cases to 6/6, 6/9, and 6/9 postoperatively. Persistent hypotony because of possible activation of a preexisting doormant cyclodialysis cleft following routine atraumatic phacoemulsification cataract surgery in previously traumatized eyes has not been reported.
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ranking = 2
keywords = phacoemulsification
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4/5. Anterior scleral buckling procedure for cyclodialysis cleft with chronic hypotony.

    Cyclodialysis clefts occur when the attachment of the ciliary body to the scleral spur is disrupted. The mechanism is usually traumatic or iatrogenic after phacoemulsification or other intraocular manipulation. Treatment becomes necessary when hypotony occurs, with maculopathy being the most visually significant sequela. A patient who failed conventional treatment for hypotony and eventually benefited from a novel surgery to correct his cyclodialysis cleft is described.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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5/5. Cyclodialysis cleft following a scleral tunnel incision.

    We report a case of ocular hypotony secondary to a cyclodialysis cleft that developed following a phacoemulsification procedure in which a scleral tunnel incision was used. A cyclodialysis cleft should be suspected in cases of persistent postoperative hypotony.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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