Cases reported "Vaginitis"

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1/26. Foreign body in vagina--an uncommon cause of vaginitis in children.

    An intravaginal foreign body of long duration can pose diagnostic dilemma in children. We present a case of eight and a half years old girl who was suffering from blood stained vaginal discharge for 3 years for which she was treated by few gynaecologists. A vaginal examination performed under general anaesthesia revealed a foreign body (lead pencil). In cases of pediatric vaginitis one should always look for foreign body in vagina.
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2/26. Cervicovaginitis emphysematosa mimicking carcinoma of the cervix: a case report.

    Cervicovaginitis emphysematous is a rare self-limiting disease in which multiple gas-filled cysts are present in the submucosa of the upper vagina and ectocervix. We report a case in a 40 year-old trader who presented with clinical features suggestive of carcinoma of the cervix. It is hoped that this case report will heighten the awareness of clinicians and pathologists in the recognition of this unusual condition.
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3/26. Vaginitis emphysematosa: CT and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE: This report describes the CT appearance of vaginitis emphysematosa. CONCLUSION: Vaginitis emphysematosa is characterized by gas-filled cysts in the vaginal wall, in a pattern similar to pneumatosis of the intestines or bladder. This bacterial vaginitis is benign and self-limited and does not signify the presence of tissue necrosis or life-threatening infection.
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keywords = vaginitis
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4/26. Vaginal mucormycosis: a case report.

    Although Zygomycetes cause life-threatening, opportunistic infections in immunocompromised hosts, the first case of vaginitis caused by Mucor species in a healthy woman is reported. Mucor vaginitis, which caused mild symptoms only, was refractory to conventional azole therapy and resistant to flucytosine. Cure was achieved with topical amphotericin b.
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5/26. Vaginitis: case reports and brief review.

    Vaginitis is the most frequently gynecologic diagnosis encountered by physicians who provide primary care to women. Accurate diagnosis can be elusive, complicating treatment. Most experts believe that up to 90% of vaginitis cases are secondary to bacterial vaginosis, vulvo-vaginal candidiasis, and trichomoniasis. The diagnosis of vaginitis is based on the patient's symptoms, the physical examination, the findings of microscopic examination of the wetmount and potassium hydroxide (KOH) preparations, and the results of the pH litmus test. Additional cultures and testing may be needed for difficult-to-diagnose cases.
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keywords = vaginitis
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6/26. Lactational atrophic vaginitis.

    atrophic vaginitis is typically associated with the hypoestrogenic state of menopause. However, lactation also decreases estrogen levels and can cause symptomatic urogenital atrophy. Discussion of this clinical phenomenon in the literature is minimal. A case report of atrophic vaginitis at 13 months postpartum is presented. Mechanisms of action, evaluation, and treatments for lactational atrophic vaginitis are reviewed with recommendations for further research on this topic.
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keywords = vaginitis
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7/26. paecilomyces lilacinus vaginitis in an immuno-competent patient.

    paecilomyces lilacinus, an environmental mold found in soil and vegetation, rarely causes human infection. We report the first case of P. lilacinus isolated from a vaginal culture in a patient with vaginitis.
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8/26. lichen planus and the vulvovaginal-gingival syndrome.

    lichen planus is a dermatologic disease that affects both skin and mucosa. Here we report five cases of lichen planus that presented as the oral component of the vulvovaginal-gingival syndrome. Four of the cases were associated with biopsy-proven oral lichen planus, and all five patients had oral lesions that clinically resembled lichen planus. Three patients were taking medications that are associated with lichenoid drug reactions; four patients were postmenopausal; and all five patients had desquamative vulvovaginitis. Clinicians may see these patients when they show persistent signs and symptoms of oral lichen planus. We report five case histories and review the 127 cases found in the literature to make the practicing clinician aware of this unusual clinical entity. The hepatitis c virus association and drug-induced lichenoid mucositis are topics that are addressed. In addition, clarification of the issues surrounding the premalignant potential of oral lichen planus is provided with evidence, rationale, and data from the literature to support the position that true oral lichen planus has no inherent predisposition to become malignant.
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keywords = vaginitis
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9/26. Common infections in clinical practice: dealing with the daily uncertainties.

    Common infections we see every day in the office--urinary tract infections, vaginitis, upper respiratory tract infections, and soft-tissue infections--present a number of diagnostic and treatment uncertainties. In this age of growing antibiotic resistance, these include if and when to start antibiotic therapy, and which agents to use.
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keywords = vaginitis
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10/26. hematocolpos associated with a remote history of chronic vaginitis and a diagnostic vaginal biopsy: a case report.

    Bacterial vaginitis is commonly seen in the pediatric population. Severe or recurrent cases may be associated with ulcerative lesions. We report a case of vaginal biopsies of ulcerative lesions in a 9-year-old which led to severe vaginal adhesions, stenosis, and hematocolpos. A vaginoscopy and resection from below were not successful and an exploratory laparotomy with uterine perforation and sounding into the upper vagina were required to reopen the lower vaginal canal. We recommend the limited use of vaginal biopsies in the face of a typical vaginitis presentation, and aggressive treatment to promote mucosa healing when biopsies are required.
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keywords = vaginitis
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