Cases reported "Vaginosis, Bacterial"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Can group B streptococci cause symptomatic vaginitis?

    BACKGROUND: Maternal cervicovaginal colonization with Lancefield group B streptococci (GBS) is an important risk factor for neonatal morbidity and mortality. About 15% of women are carriers of GBS. Usually, they are asymptomatic. CASES: We describe two patients with symptomatic vaginitis for which no apparent cause was found. Both patients were heavily colonized with GBS. After antibiotic treatment, both became asymptomatic and culture negative, but after recolonization with GBS, symptoms resumed. This phenomenon was repeatedly observed. After emergence of resistance to antibiotics, local application of chlorhexidine appeared to be the only useful treatment. CONCLUSION: We hypothesize that GBS-vaginitis may be a possible disease entity. Although at present it is not clear why some patients become symptomatic, we speculate that the immunologic response is somehow selectively hampered in such patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Complexity of vaginal microflora as analyzed by PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in a patient with recurrent bacterial vaginosis.

    OBJECTIVE: gardnerella vaginalis has long been the most common pathogen associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV). We aimed to test our hypothesis that symptoms and signs of BV do not necessarily indicate colonization by this organism, and often will not respond to standard metronidazole or clindamycin treatment. methods: Using a relatively new molecular tool, PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), the vaginal microflora of a woman with recalcitrant signs and symptoms of BV was investigated over a 6-week timeframe. RESULTS: The vagina was colonized by pathogenic enterobacteriaceae, staphylococci and candida albicans. The detection of the yeast by PCR-DGGE is particularly novel and enhances the ability of this tool to examine the true nature of the vaginal microflora. The patient had not responded to antifungal treatment, antibiotic therapy targeted at anaerobic Gram-negative pathogens such as Gardnerella, nor daily oral probiotic intake of lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The failure to find the GG strain in the vagina indicated it did not reach the site, and the low counts of lactobacilli demonstrated that therapy with this probiotic did not appear to influence the vaginal flora. CONCLUSIONS: BV is not well understood in terms of its causative organisms, and further studies appear warranted using non-culture, molecular methods. Only when the identities of infecting organisms are confirmed can effective therapy be devized. Such therapy may include the use of probiotic lactobacilli, but only using strains which confer a benefit on the vagina of pre- and postmenopausal women.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. Isolation of Dialister pneumosintes isolated from a bacteremia of vaginal origin.

    In this report, we review one case of bacteremia infection due to Dialister pneumosintes. The patient was admitted in post-partum with vaginosis and suppurative thrombosis of the ovarian veina. D. pneumosintes was isolated in pure culture from the three blood culture flasks. Identification of this bacterium was difficult and requires the amplification and partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The patients had favorable outcome after antibiotic treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. pasteurella multocida meningitis in a two-day old neonate.

    A normal full-term baby boy, born by vaginal delivery, became ill on day 2 with fever and failure to feed. CSF examination revealed 260 x 10(6)/l leucocytes, mainly mononuclears, protein 2 g/l and glucose zero. pasteurella multocida was isolated in pure culture from the baby's CSF, blood and umbilicus and from the mother's vagina. The baby was treated with i.v. penicillin for 7 weeks. Progress was complicated by mild hydrocephalus, which resolved, and prolonged low grade fever. Recovery was complete, without neurological sequelae. This case illustrates that P. multocida can infect the vagina where it presents a hazard to a newborn infant delivered vaginally. early diagnosis is critical, intravenous high dose penicillin being the treatment of choice.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. What is normal vaginal flora?

    OBJECTIVE: To observe the composition of the vaginal flora of healthy women over time, and in relation to hormonal changes, sexual activity, and hygiene habits. DESIGN: A longitudinal surveillance of the vaginal flora over an eight week period. SUBJECTS: 26 female health care workers in local genitourinary medicine clinics. methods: The participants were anonymised. They filled in diary cards daily. Blind vaginal swabs were self-taken two-seven times weekly. A smear was air-dried for later Gram staining. The swabs were also cultured for Candida spp, gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobes, mycoplasma hominis and ureaplasma urealyticum. RESULTS: Of 26 subjects, only four had normal vaginal microbiology throughout. One woman, who was not sexually active, had bacterial vaginosis (BV) throughout and nine (35%) had intermittent BV. candidiasis was found intermittently in eight women (31%), and eight had normal microscopy. U urealyticum was isolated intermittently in 40% of women with BV, 25% with candida, and 50% with normal microscopy. Many women were symptomatic, but symptoms correlated poorly with microbiological findings. All but two women were sexually active; however, more women with BV were exposed to semen. BV seemed to be related to frequent use of scented soap, and there appeared to be an additive effect of clothing and hygiene factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our study raises doubts about what should be regarded as normal vaginal flora. It calls into question the significance of finding BV or U urealyticum on a single occasion in asymptomatic women, or of finding normal flora in symptomatic women. The effect of external factors on the vaginal flora deserve further study.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Vaginosis, Bacterial'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.