Cases reported "Varicose Veins"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/10. Trans-anastomotic porto-portal varices in patients with gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    AIM: Porto-portal varices are commonly seen in patients with segmental extra-hepatic portal hypertension and develop to provide a collateral circulation around an area of portal venous obstruction. It is not well recognized that such communications may also develop across surgical anastomoses and be the source of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The possible mode of development of such communications has not been previously discussed. MATERIALS AND methods: Over a 3-year period between 1995 and 1998, porto-portal varices were demonstrated across surgical anastomoses in four patients who were referred for the investigation of acute (two), acute-on-chronic (one) and chronic gastrointestinal bleeding (one). Their medical notes and the findings at angiography were reviewed. RESULTS: Three patients had segmental portal hypertension due to extra-hepatic portal vein (one) or superior mesenteric vein (two) stenosis/occlusion. One patient had mild portal hypertension due to hepatic fibrosis secondary to congenital biliary atresia. At angiography all patients were shown to have varices crossing previous surgical anastomoses. These varices were presumed to be the cause of bleeding in three of the four patients; the site of bleeding in the fourth individual was not determined. CONCLUSIONS: Trans-anastomotic porto-portal varices are rare. They develop in the presence of extra-hepatic portal hypertension and presumably arise within peri-anastomotic inflammatory tissue. Such varices may be difficult to manage and their prognosis is poor when bleeding occurs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/10. Subepicranial varix mimicking sinus pericranii: usefulness of three-dimensional computed tomography angiography and bone window computed tomography--case report.

    A 16-year-old female presented with a rare case of subepicranial varix in the left temporal area manifesting as a soft mass in the left temporal area when she laid down in the left lateral position. Bulging of the mass was observed when intracranial venous pressure was raised by the valsalva maneuver, the left lateral position, or the prone position. Bone window computed tomography (CT) revealed a tiny hole, 1 mm in diameter, in the outer bone table. Three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) angiography clearly visualized a mass with a diameter of approximately 10 mm connected to the diploic vein. The mass was totally resected by operation. Venous bleeding was observed from the tiny hole. Histological examination revealed a venous lesion mimicking sinus pericranii and containing endothelial cells. No communication with the intracranial venous sinuses was identified, so the diagnosis was subepicranial varix. Radiological examination by direct injection of contrast medium is usually performed to identify subepicranial varix, but 3D-CT angiography is a non-invasive preoperative examination that can visualize this small venous lesion. Adjustment of the CT acquisition conditions may allow 3D-CT angiography to identify sinus pericranii in the future.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/10. Pulmonary varix regression after mitral valve replacement.

    Pulmonary varix is a rare finding; only 35 documented cases have been reported. The first case was described in 1843 as an icidental postmortem finding. The first clinical diagnosis was not made until 1951. In more than half of the 35 cases, the varix was present in the absence of congenital and acquired heart disease. Six patients have had concomitant mitral rheumatic heart disease. This communication describes the second patient with rheumatic mitral regurgitation in whom the pulmonary varix became radiographically invisible after prosthetic mitral valve replacement.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/10. An asymptomatic pulmonary hilar mass: a case report.

    Pulmonary vein varix is a rare benign abnormality, either congenital or acquired, usually presented without symptoms. It is most frequently discovered by chance on a chest radiograph, whereas computed tomography defines the special characteristics of the lesion. angiography is considered the method of choice for final diagnosis. The authors present the first case of a patient with pulmonary vein varix accompanied by interatrial communication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/10. Colonic varices. Report of a case.

    A 14-year-old girl who had colonic bleeding caused by colonic varices is described. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, radiography of the small and large bowel, and vascular studies of the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and the portal vein were all reported to be normal. Submucosal varices, however, were identified colonoscopically in relation to the hepatic flexure and the sigmoid colon. dilatation of subserosal right colonic vascular channels was identified at operation. Right hemicolectomy was performed and there has been no further bleeding. No obvious mesenteric arteriovenous communications were identified histologically.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/10. Transhepatic embolization of superior mesenteric varices in portal hypertension.

    A 49-year-old woman with a history of excessive consumption of alcohol experienced lower-intestinal bleeding 2 years after undergoing a total abdominal hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy because of carcinoma of the cervix. Mesenteric arteriograms showed large, focal varices in the ileum, hepatofugal blood flow, and an abnormal communication between these varices and the right ovarian vein. Percutaneous transhepatic embolization of these varices with absorbable, gelatin sponge (Gelfoam) and coils was successful in stopping the intestinal bleeding.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/10. Bleeding intestinal varices associated with portal hypertension and previous abdominal surgery.

    patients with portal hypertension may develop portasystemic communication in adhesions formed after earlier surgery. This condition causes localized mesenteric and intestinal varices which may lead to significant gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Two patients with this disease spectrum are discussed. The recommended treatment was resection of the involved intestine and formation of a portacaval shunt to eliminate recurrence of the varices and subsequent hemorrhage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/10. The left ascending lumbar vein: a potential pitfall in CT diagnosis.

    A communication between the left ascending lumbar vein and the left renal vein may be mistaken for a para-aortic mass on abdominal computed tomography due to a localised dilatation at the confluence of these veins. The use of contiguous closely collimated sections and the injection of intravenous contrast medium overcomes this potential pitfall which may be particularly important in the staging of patients with testicular neoplasms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/10. gallbladder varices: demonstration of direct communication to intrahepatic portal veins by color doppler sonography and CT during arterial portography.

    gallbladder varices were correctly diagnosed by color Doppler sonography and computed tomography during arterial portography (CTAP) in two patients with portal vein thrombosis. One patient with multiple hepatocellular carcinomas showed extrahepatic and intrahepatic portal vein occlusion by a tumor thrombus. The other patient, with liver cirrhosis, had a portal vein thrombosis. color Doppler sonography clearly showed the portal vein occlusion, cavernous transformation of collateral veins, and gallbladder varices that drained into the intrahepatic portal venous branches. The intrahepatic portal venous branch, connecting to the gallbladder varices, exhibited reverse flow from the periphery to the hilum of the liver. CTAP also demonstrated gallbladder varices communicating directly with the intrahepatic portal vein branches in both patients. gallbladder varices developed as a venous collateral because of extrahepatic portal vein occlusion. color Doppler sonography and CTAP are useful for detecting these varices and planning biliary surgery in patients with portal vein thrombosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/10. Aberrant external jugular vein phlebectasia with tongue pain.

    We have not encountered any other report of phlebectasia with tongue pain in the literature. The pain disappeared after the anomalous venous communication was excised.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Varicose Veins'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.