Cases reported "Varicose Veins"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/25. Trans-anastomotic porto-portal varices in patients with gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    AIM: Porto-portal varices are commonly seen in patients with segmental extra-hepatic portal hypertension and develop to provide a collateral circulation around an area of portal venous obstruction. It is not well recognized that such communications may also develop across surgical anastomoses and be the source of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The possible mode of development of such communications has not been previously discussed. MATERIALS AND methods: Over a 3-year period between 1995 and 1998, porto-portal varices were demonstrated across surgical anastomoses in four patients who were referred for the investigation of acute (two), acute-on-chronic (one) and chronic gastrointestinal bleeding (one). Their medical notes and the findings at angiography were reviewed. RESULTS: Three patients had segmental portal hypertension due to extra-hepatic portal vein (one) or superior mesenteric vein (two) stenosis/occlusion. One patient had mild portal hypertension due to hepatic fibrosis secondary to congenital biliary atresia. At angiography all patients were shown to have varices crossing previous surgical anastomoses. These varices were presumed to be the cause of bleeding in three of the four patients; the site of bleeding in the fourth individual was not determined. CONCLUSIONS: Trans-anastomotic porto-portal varices are rare. They develop in the presence of extra-hepatic portal hypertension and presumably arise within peri-anastomotic inflammatory tissue. Such varices may be difficult to manage and their prognosis is poor when bleeding occurs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/25. Ectopic intestinal varices as a rare cause of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    Ectopic intestinal varices are rarely responsible for lower gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage. A case of 55 years old male with recurrent melena is being presented, who was found to have scattered varices on small as well as large intestine. Selective review of literature regarding presentation, diagnosis and management of these cases is also part of presentation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/25. Familial and idiopathic colonic varices: an unusual cause of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    A patient is described presenting with an acute lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage as a result of extensive colonic varices. Further investigation revealed that there were no oesophageal varices or splenomegaly. Liver biopsy showed grade II fatty change only, with no other specific or significant pathological features. Transhepatic portography showed a raised portal pressure (20 mm/Hg) but the portal system was patent throughout. There was an abnormal leash of vessels in the caecum thought to represent a variceal plexus. This patient was diagnosed as having idiopathic colonic varices. This case is discussed together with nine other reports of idiopathic colonic varices from the published literature. Four of these reports describe idiopathic colonic varices in more than one member of the same family. Possible modes of inheritance, aetiology of variceal change, natural history, and prognosis are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/25. Umbilical varix presenting as an incarcerated umbilical hernia--a costly mistake if not recognised.

    Incarcerated umbilical hernias commonly present as emergencies. Often they are diagnosed clinically and repaired surgically. In the case reported here, surgery could have been complicated by a major haemorrhage. An accurate history, high index of suspicion and attention to detail are paramount.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/25. Duodenal varicose veins.

    Duodenal varices (DV) are rare. We present a review of published cases with emphasis on the management and outcome, as illustrated by our own cases, which reflects the experience reported in the literature. The diagnosis of DV must be considered in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Two-thirds of all reported cases have portal venous hypertension caused by hepatic cirrhosis. In the remaining one-third prehepatic portal hypertension as a consequence of either a compromised portal venous circulation (caused by perivenous tumor or inflammation) or a primary haematological disease is the underlying cause. Previously, duodenoscopy has often failed to detect and correctly interpret DV, and was similarly unsuccessful in our case. This case report demonstrates the problems and shortcomings in the management of DV and documents a hither to unreported cause. Treatment depends on the severity of bleeding. When conservative measures cannot control the haemorrhage, emergency laparotomy may be indicated. The type of surgery should be chosen according to the aetiology, site and extent of the bleeding DV. Among 112 reported cases of DV, information on outcome exists for only 35 patients who presented with haemorrhage. The aetiology was liver cirrhosis in 26 of these patients, 10 of whom had a fatal outcome, and prehepatic portal hypertension in the remaining 9, 1 of whom had a fatal outcome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/25. Variceal haemorrhage in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Hepatic in involvement in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia can lead to cirrhosis and occasionally to portal hypertension and variceal haemorrhage. The ultrasonographic, arteriographic and histological findings are described in a patient with this complication. hepatic artery embolisation proved unsuccessful in arresting repeated haemorrhage which was eventually controlled by hepatic artery ligation. Porto-systemic venous shunting, an apparently logical approach to management, would probably have aggravated the problem.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/25. Ileal conduit hemorrhage secondary to portal hypertension.

    The clinical features and management of 3 patients who presented with the triad of massive hemorrhage from the ileal conduit, portal hypertension due to liver disease, and portosystemic varices related to the conduits are described. One patient, a class C cirrhotic, was treated conservatively and died of blood loss and hepatic coma. Two patients were managed with splenorenal shunts initially, followed by creation of colon conduits, and are currently doing well. Surgical approximation of areas draining in the portal and systemic circulation with subsequent development or adhesion-related varices probably explains the predilection for involvement of the ileal conduit and may explain the presence of varices in mild to moderate portal hypertension before other signs of hepatic decompensation are evident. Superior mesenteric angiography with special attention directed at the venous phase is necessary to document this entity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.10527942011124
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/25. Familial varices of the colon.

    Two patients from the same family with varices throughout the entire colon and no apparent portal hypertension, are described. One patient experienced profuse bleeding after polypectomy, the other had recurrent rectal blood loss.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.10527942011124
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/25. Haemorrhage from an adhesion-related mesenteric varix in a patient with portal hypertension.

    We report a case of profuse gastrointestinal haemorrhage from an ileal varix, in a segment of bowel adherent to the site of a previous incisional hernia repair, in a patient with portal hypertension. This is a rare but recognised complication of portal hypertension. Localisation of the bleeding point was achieved by radionuclide scanning and the segment of abnormal bowel was successfully resected.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/25. sclerotherapy for massive enterostomy bleeding resulting from portal hypertension.

    Three patients with frequent and massive hemorrhage from enterostomy (colostomy 2, ileostomy 1) due to portal hypertension are reported. The hemorrhages were treated with sclerotherapy by submucous injections of polidocanol (Ethoxysclerol) or phenol (5 percent) almond oil. In one patient, a complete and long-term stoppage of the bleeding was achieved. In the second patient, a marked reduction in the amount of blood loss and an increase in the time between bleeding episodes occurred. In the third patient, only a short-lived effect of a few weeks was reached.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.10527942011124
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Varicose Veins'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.