Cases reported "Vascular Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/108. Arterial imaging.

    angioscopy, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography, and nuclear medicine are assuming an increasingly important role in arterial imaging. This review discusses recent advances in these modalities. angioscopy has proven valuable in monitoring intraoperative surgical procedures as well as percutaneous interventions. Carotid artery magnetic resonance angiography is gaining increasing acceptance in clinical practice. magnetic resonance angiography of the peripheral arteries is limited by spatial resolution and signal loss distal to the stenosis. The role of computed tomography in limiting the number of aortograms performed in evaluating aortic laceration remains controversial; however, several recent papers indicate its usefulness in evaluating clinically stable patients with abnormal chest radiographs. Computed tomography of abdominal aortic aneurysms may obviate the need for preoperative aortography in the majority of cases. Nuclear imaging for deep venous thrombosis using 111In-labeled antifibrin monoclonal antibodies was shown highly sensitive in its initial report.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/108. Cystic adventitial disease--cause of intermittent claudication in male non-smokers. A case report.

    A case of intermittent claudication in a middle-aged lifelong non-smoker caused by cystic adventitial disease is reported. Etiology, clinical and angiographic findings, modes of operative treatment, and other possible causes of calf claudication in young non-smokers are briefly discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/108. Emergency stent-graft repair of a ruptured hepatic artery secondary to local postoperative peritonitis.

    PURPOSE: To describe the use of a stent-graft for emergent repair of life-threatening hepatic artery hemorrhage. methods AND RESULTS: A 57-year-old man with a 17-year history of myxoid liposarcoma underwent surgery for a recurrent abdominal mass. Multivisceral resection including a Kausch-Whipple procedure with an extended right hemicolectomy was performed. Three weeks later, an episode of gastrointestinal bleeding prompted surgical repair of the hepatic artery, which had been eroded by infection due to a leaking bilioenteric anastomosis. After 3 weeks of programmed abdominal lavage, bleeding recurred. Angiography documented another rupture of the proximal hepatic artery. After an unsuccessful attempt at coil embolization, a Hemobahn stent-graft was implanted percutaneously during simultaneous cardiopulmonary resuscitation. hemostasis was secured, and the patient recovered. Over the 10-month follow-up, no bleeding or infection has been observed at the site of the repair, and flow through the hepatic artery endograft remains satisfactory. CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous stent-graft placement can be employed for emergent treatment of visceral artery rupture in patients at high risk for conventional surgical repair.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/108. Intraoesophageal rupture of a thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    The intraoesophageal rupture of a large thoracic aortic aneurysm is reported in a 49 year old man. He had been hypertensive for some years while the aneurysm increased in size. Although a graft was successfully inserted to repair the leak, infection from the oesophagus with candida albicans, subsequently led to secondary haemorrhage and death 17 days later. A plea is made for the earlier referral of patients with aneurysm prior to rupture, as the operative mortality rises markedly after rupture has occurred and in this case the situation was virtually irreparable.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/108. Spontaneous rupture of the left common iliac vein.

    We report a case of spontaneous rupture of the left common iliac vein in a 58-year-old woman. Because of hemorrhagic shock, the intervention had to be performed under emergency circumstances, precluding repair of the external iliac vein, which was ligated. The postoperative course was uneventful. We also review the 17 prior cases found in the literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/108. Rotational compression of the vertebral artery at the point of dural penetration. Case report.

    vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) due to vertebral artery (VA) compression occurs in a significant number of patients. Rotational compression of the VA usually occurs below C-2, where the artery is pinched during head rotation, leading to thrombus formation and subsequent cerebellar infarction. Although this problem has been reported to occur at the atlantooccipital levels, a review of the literature revealed no published cases of VA compression at the point of dural penetration, which is located above the atlantooccipital membrane. The authors report the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with signs and symptoms of VBI. Dynamic angiography demonstrated left-sided VA compression at the site at which dural penetration had occurred, proximal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Surgical decompression of the left VA at the point of dural penetration relieved the symptoms, and postoperative dynamic angiography demonstrated complete resolution of the positional compression of the left VA. Because of these findings, an additional possible location for rotational compression of the VA is described, namely, the point of dural penetration. The authors suggest a method of surgically treating rotational VA compression at this site.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/108. Portal venous calcifications 20 years after portosystemic shunting: demonstration by spiral CT with CT angiography and 3D reconstructions.

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of the value of spiral computed tomography (SCT), and postprocessing procedures in patients with extensive portal venous calcifications 20 years after portosystemic shunting was performed. methods: In two patients spiral CT (SCT) examinations of the abdomen (slice thickness 3 mm, table feed 6 mm/s) were performed prior and after application of 150 ml of contrast material administered at a flow rate of 4 ml/s. Axial images were reconstructed at 2 mm increments for postprocessing procedures and 6 mm increments for axial source images. Postprocessing was performed with a maximum intensity projection (MIP) and shaded surface display (SSD) imaging program. RESULTS: In both cases preoperative plain film radiography of the chest and abdomen showed large curvilinear calcifications located at the upper quadrant of the abdomen. The calcifications were directed along the expected axis and position of the portal vein and the portosystemic venous anastomosis. Axial CT slices and CTA showed that the calcifications were located in the vessel wall and that the portal vein lumen as well as the portosystemic venous anastomosis were patent. CONCLUSION: Long-standing portal hypertension is capable of causing portal venous calcifications due to mechanical stress to the vessel wall even years after performing portosystemic shunting. Typically, the calcifications are directed along the expected axis and position of the portal vein. SCT of the portal venous system is a reliable method to differentiate between calcifications in a thrombus or in the vessel wall, which may have therapeutic significance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/108. Transvenous pacemaker insertion ipsilateral to chronic subclavian vein obstruction: an operative technique for children and adults.

    subclavian vein occlusion limits insertion of pacing electrodes in children and adults. The concern is greatest in children with a long-term need for pacing systems necessitating use of the contralateral vein and potential bilateral loss of access in the future. We describe an operative technique to provide ipsilateral access in chronic subclavian vein occlusion in five consecutive pediatric (n = 4, mean age 6.5 years) and adult (n = 1, age 70 with bilateral subclavian vein occlusion) patients in whom this condition was noted at the time of pacemaker or ICD implant. Occlusion was documented by venography. Pediatric cardiac diagnoses included complete heart block in all patients, tetralogy of fallot in three, and L-transposition of the great vessels in one. Percutaneous brachiocephalic (innominate) or deep subclavian venous access was achieved by a supraclavicular approach using an 18-gauge Deseret angiocath, a Terumo Glidewire, and dilation to permit one or two 9-11 Fr sheaths. Electrode(s) were positioned in the heart and tunneled (pre- or retroclavicularly) to a pre- or retropectoral pocket. Pacemaker and ICD implants were successful in all without any complication of pneumothorax, arterial or nerve injury, or need for transfusion. Inadvertent arterial access did not occur as compared with prior infraclavicular attempts. One preclavicularly tunneled electrode dislodged with extreme exertion and was revised. Ipsilateral transvenous access for pacemaker or ICD is possible via a deep supraclavicular percutaneous approach when the subclavian venous obstruction is discovered at the time of implant. In children, it avoids the use of the contralateral vein that may be needed for future pacing systems in adulthood. This venous approach provides access large enough to allow even dual chamber pacing in children and can be accomplished safely.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/108. Vascular reconstruction of a vertebral artery loop causing cervical radiculopathy and vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Case report.

    The authors present the case of a 62-year-old man with a 4-month history of progressive left-sided C-5 radiculopathy and dizziness. neuroimaging studies revealed a looped vertebral artery (VA) that had migrated into the widened left C4-5 intervertebral foramen. The patient underwent vascular reconstruction of the VA loop, in which there was minimal manipulation of the C-5 nerve root, via a left-sided anterolateral approach after a balloon occlusion test. Postoperatively the patient's symptoms improved immediately, and there were no signs of recurrence within the 2-year follow-up period. This excellent outcome supports the belief that a proper surgical reconstruction of the compressive, tortuous VA should be the therapeutic option of choice, which carries a lower risk of the nerve root injury and improves the hemodynamics in the posterior circulation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/108. Dieulafoy's lesion of the small bowel causing massive gastrointestinal bleeding: two case reports and literature review.

    Dieulafoy's lesions are an often unrecognized cause of obscure, massive GI hemorrhage. Their diagnosis may elude conventional investigations, including upper and lower endoscopy, arteriography, and even laparotomy. In this paper, we report two cases of small-bowel Dieulafoy lesions. The first, a jejunal lesion, occurred in a young patient and was discovered at laparotomy. The second was an ileal Dieulafoy's malformation in an older patient. An intraoperative endoscopy with surgical guidance may be needed for definitive localization of this lesion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Vascular Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.