Cases reported "Vascular Diseases"

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1/276. Arterial imaging.

    angioscopy, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography, and nuclear medicine are assuming an increasingly important role in arterial imaging. This review discusses recent advances in these modalities. angioscopy has proven valuable in monitoring intraoperative surgical procedures as well as percutaneous interventions. Carotid artery magnetic resonance angiography is gaining increasing acceptance in clinical practice. magnetic resonance angiography of the peripheral arteries is limited by spatial resolution and signal loss distal to the stenosis. The role of computed tomography in limiting the number of aortograms performed in evaluating aortic laceration remains controversial; however, several recent papers indicate its usefulness in evaluating clinically stable patients with abnormal chest radiographs. Computed tomography of abdominal aortic aneurysms may obviate the need for preoperative aortography in the majority of cases. Nuclear imaging for deep venous thrombosis using 111In-labeled antifibrin monoclonal antibodies was shown highly sensitive in its initial report.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis, deep
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2/276. Unilateral iliac vein occlusion, caused by bladder enlargement, simulating deep venous thrombosis.

    A variety of conditions cause unilateral leg swelling and thus mimic deep venous thrombosis (DVT). A heretofore-underappreciated condition that may lead to unilateral iliac vein compression, simulating DVT, is massive enlargement of the bladder caused by urinary retention. A case that demonstrates this condition is described. Although this disorder has been reported only three times before, its occurrence should be recognized by clinicians in light of the overall aging of our society. In addition, this case highlights the need for careful and thorough evaluation of patients who have unilateral lower-extremity edema.
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ranking = 9.2531982678843
keywords = vein, thrombosis, venous thrombosis, deep
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3/276. Phlebosclerosis of the colon with positive anti-centromere antibody.

    A 56-year-old woman with symptoms of chronic bowel disease presented a peculiar calcification of the mesenteric vein of the ascending to transverse colon on barium enema study. The resected colon was hard and black. Histo-pathologic examinations demonstrated fibrous change of the colon with a calcified and hyaline-deposited mesenteric vein. No cell infiltration was observed. These findings were compatible with phlebosclerosis and also with systemic sclerosis. Positive anti-centromere antibody and Raynaud's phenomenon, hallmarks of a variant systemic sclerosis, the crest syndrome were observed. We therefore speculated that the pathogenesis of the phlebosclerosis of the colon is related to the crest syndrome.
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ranking = 1.7672864222298
keywords = vein
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4/276. Marked increase in flow velocities during deep expiration: A duplex Doppler sign of celiac artery compression syndrome.

    Symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia develop when the celiac artery is constricted by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. Lateral aortography is the primary modality for diagnosing ligamentous compression of the celiac artery. However, duplex Doppler sonography performed during deep expiration can cause a marked increase in flow velocities at the compressed region of the celiac artery and suggest the diagnosis of celiac arterial constriction due to the diaphragmatic ligament.
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ranking = 0.024517666073898
keywords = deep
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5/276. Inferior vena cava hypoplasia with intrahepatic venous continuation: sonographic, angiographic and MR features including MR angiography.

    In cases of inborn or acquired obstacles on the inferior vena cava (IVC), the derived blood flow usually goes through collaterals in the azygos or the hemiazygos venous systems. Exceptionally, a collateral pathway through the portal system or through an anastomosis in between hepatic veins, shunting the IVC interruption, is encountered. In the present paper, the authors describe the fortuitous discovery of a IVC hypoplasia in its retrohepatic segment. MR venography, correlated with fluoroscopic angiography, clearly depicted an intrahepatic collateral circulation consisting of a double aneurysmal communication between an inferior right hepatic vein and the main right hepatic vein.
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ranking = 2.6509296333447
keywords = vein
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6/276. Segmental portal hypertension due to splenic vein obstruction: imaging findings and diagnostic pitfalls in four cases.

    Segmental portal hypertension due to isolated splenic vein obstruction is a rare but important entity as it is the only curable cause of portal hypertension by splenectomy. Four cases are presented illustrating the radiological features of splenic vein obstruction, and the diagnostic pitfalls that arose in patients with complicated clinical presentations.
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ranking = 5.3018592666894
keywords = vein
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7/276. Soleus rupture: a differential diagnosis of calf thrombosis.

    Soleus rupture may present with clinical features similar to those of calf thrombosis. It is postulated that the signs are the result of compression of the posterior tibial vein as it passes through the narrow space adjacent to the fibrous origin of soleus. A distinctive venographic sign of compression of the posterior tibial vein by a soft tissue mass at the level of the origin of the soleus is described.
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ranking = 5.9176798177048
keywords = vein, thrombosis
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8/276. Clinical significance of azygos vein enlargement: radiographic recognition and etiologic analysis.

    azygos vein enlargement can be detected in congestive heart failure, portal hypertension, inferior vena cava thrombosis, right atrial mural thrombosis, a pulmonary embolism, congenital azygos continuation to the inferior vena cava, and the arteriovenous fistula. radiography, particularly computed tomography (CT), is very useful, not only in recognition of azygos vein enlargement, but also in evaluation of its etiology for the institution of the appropriate treatment of the diseases.
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ranking = 6.9620166248794
keywords = vein, thrombosis
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9/276. Pacing lead adhesions after long-term ventricular pacing via the coronary sinus.

    Left ventricular pacing via the coronary sinus is being increasingly used. There is little data to guide possible lead extractions that might be required in the future. Significant adhesions to the coronary veins were found 12 years after placing a pacing lead in the posterolateral coronary vein in a man with double inlet left ventricle and severe subpulmonary stenosis who had undergone a Fontan operation. The appearances suggest that percutaneous extraction from the proximal coronary sinus may be feasible but that difficulty may be encountered if the lead tip is placed into the distal coronary veins.
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ranking = 2.6509296333447
keywords = vein
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10/276. Giant cervical epidural veins after lumbar puncture in a case of intracranial hypotension.

    A 29-year-old woman presented with dilated epidural veins and incapacitating headache after undergoing a lumbar puncture. Two months later, the results of follow-up MR imaging were normal. These findings suggest that temporary dilation of the epidural vein may occur in association with post-lumbar puncture intracranial hypotension syndrome. In these cases, it seems useful to confirm whether the patient has recently undergone a lumbar puncture.
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ranking = 5.3018592666894
keywords = vein
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