Cases reported "Vascular Neoplasms"

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1/6. upper extremity pain of 10 years duration caused by a glomus tumor.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Long-standing limb pain typically has a multifactorial etiology not amenable to causal therapy. We present a case of chronic progressing upper extremity pain caused by a glomus tumor; the excision was curative. methods: A 39-year-old woman presented with 10-year history of constant deep internal throbbing, aching pain localized to the radial aspect of the left index finger and additional intermittent shooting pains radiating up the arm toward the shoulder. pain was increased after minor local trauma, following cold exposure, and for unknown reasons. A blotchy, bluish skin discoloration could appear on the radial aspect of the index finger during severe pain. Nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs, narcotics, amitriptyline, local heat, bracing, and a sympathetic nerve block had all been ineffective. The physical examination was characterized by exquisite pressure tenderness over the radial aspect of the left index finger, most pronounced just distal to the distal interphalengeal joint. RESULTS: Inflation of a left arm blood pressure cuff to above systolic pressures abolished pain. A glomus tumor was suspected and confirmed by histologic examination. CONCLUSIONS: Glomus tumors are rare, benign neoplasms (1 to 5% of all hand tumors), developing from neuromyoarterial glomus bodies. They usually present with pain and may mimic other painful conditions, delaying the average time until diagnosis for up to 10 years. The classic diagnostic triad consists of local pain, pressure tenderness, and cold hypersensitivity. Abolition of pain following inflation of a blood pressure cuff to above systolic levels (ischemia test) is highly diagnostic. We suggest routine use of this test in cases of upper limb pain of unclear etiology.
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keywords = glomus
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2/6. neck mass caused by an intraluminal jugular paraganglioma.

    Paragangliomas can develop in a number of head and neck sites, the most common being the carotid body paragangliomas and glomus jugulare tumours. This is a case of a paraganglioma confined entirely within the lumen of the jugular vein.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = glomus
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3/6. Aspiration cytology of glomus tumor: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: glomus tumor is a relatively uncommon soft tissue tumor that can occur at any age and anatomic site, with a predilection for the subungual region. CASE: A 24-year-old female presented with a gradually enlarging, painful swelling in the subungual region of the right index finger. Fine needle aspiration was performed under a ring block and yielded hemorrhagic material. The smears revealed clusters of uniform, round to oval cells admixed with wisps of magenta intercellular myxoid material and a few spindle-shaped cells crossing clusters of tumor cells. A diagnosis of benign vascular tumor consistent with glomus tumor was given. Subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis and showed alpha-SMA positivity on immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSION: This case report is the second on the cytologic features of glomus tumor in the English-language literature. Although the cytomorphologic features of glomus tumor are quite distinctive, an appropriate clinical history and immunohistochemical stains (e.g., alpha-SMA and vimentin positivity) can further help to ascertain the diagnosis.
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keywords = glomus
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4/6. Multiple paragangliomas of the head and neck.

    Multiple paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare conditions. The incidence of multiple paragangliomas is reported to the approximately 10% of the total patients, but in familial cases it increases up to 35-50%. In the head and neck region, the most common association is represented by bilateral carotid body tumors or by carotid body tumor associated with tympanic-jugular glomus. The presence of three synchronous glomus tumors is really rare, as well as association with vagal glomus and carotid body. In this paper the authors present a patient affected ipsilaterally by a carotid body tumor and vagal paraganglioma, focusing on the diagnostic options offered by imaging techniques (CT and MRI).
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ranking = 0.42857142857143
keywords = glomus
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5/6. A glomus tumour: classic signs without magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    A-36-year-old man presented with classic symptoms of a glomus tumour in the right index finger that failed to show on either ultrasound or high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radial finger pulp was explored despite the radiological findings and a glomus tumour 2 mm in size was excised. At follow-up the patient was pain-free. We conclude that exploration of an affected fingertip should be considered when there is a history of suspected glomus tumour even if MRI shows no sign of disease.
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ranking = 7.909257396343
keywords = glomus tumour, glomus
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6/6. Giant intravenous glomus tumor.

    We report a painful intravenous glomus tumor located in the right forearm of a 79-year-old woman. The tumor originated from the wall of a vein, protruded into its lumen and was completely excised. The largest dimension of the tumor occluding the vein was 14 cm. Tumor cells were characterized immunohistochemically by the presence of vimentin, alpha-smooth-muscle actin, and collagen IV. Intravascular spread of the glomus tumor is rare and has been described in the stomach and subcutaneous tissue. An entirely intravenous glomus tumor has been reported only three times. However, a huge intravenous growth as in our case appears never to have been reported. A review of the intravascular cases showed that the average age of presentation is 61.5 years (range 40-79 years) and the most frequent location is the forearm. Despite this intravascular growth, there is no evidence of aggressive clinical behavior, recurrence or metastasis. The pathologist must be aware of this variant of glomus tumor to avoid misdiagnosis and unnecessary additional treatments.
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ranking = 1.1428571428571
keywords = glomus
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