Cases reported "Vasculitis"

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1/335. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis--an extracutaneous neutrophilic disorder: report of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, pustular vasculitis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and Sweet's syndrome with an excellent response to cyclosporine therapy.

    The term peripheral ulcerative keratitis represents a spectrum of inflammatory diseases, characterized by cellular infiltration, corneal thinning, and ulceration. Neutrophilic dermatoses are rarely associated with peripheral ulcerative keratitis. To date, peripheral ulcerative keratitis has only been reported in patients with pyoderma gangrenosum. Separate episodes of pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet's syndrome, and pustular vasculitis developed in a 60-year-old patient with rheumatoid arthritis over an 8-year period. Over the past 2 years, 3 episodes of peripheral ulcerative keratitis occurred. cyclosporine (4 mg/kg/d) treatment was started on confirmation of pyoderma gangrenosum. Over the ensuing 2 years, it became evident that the activity of her ocular and skin diseases, as well as her arthritis, paralleled the administration or cessation of cyclosporine therapy. Dermatologists should be aware of the association of Sweet's syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, and pustular vasculitis with peripheral ulcerative keratitis. This rare ocular manifestation and the serious sequelae when left untreated make recognition crucial. cyclosporine proved to be a very effective treatment for all of our patient's diseases.
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ranking = 1
keywords = peripheral
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2/335. Vasculitis confined to the peripheral nerve and skin: a variant of non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy.

    We describe a patient presenting with vasculitic neuropathy associated with cutaneous vasculitis in the absence of other clinical or laboratory evidence of the underlying systemic vasculitis, and showing a favourable prognosis. Although the early proposed criteria for the diagnosis of non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy (NSVN) exclude the involvement of extraneural tissues, the condition observed in our patient might represent a variant of NSVN, with the vasculitis confined to the small vessels in both the peripheral nerve and the skin.
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ranking = 1.7531705369761
keywords = peripheral, neuropathy, peripheral nerve, nerve
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3/335. A Japanese case of dengue fever with lymphocytic vasculitis: diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction.

    A 37-year-old Japanese male was admitted to Nagasaki University Hospital with abrupt onset of biphasic fever, general malaise and myalgia 9 days after coming back to japan from Manila. He developed a rubella like erythematous rash 3 days after admission and purpuric eruption one week after admission. A biopsied specimen from the purpura revealed lymphocytic vasculitis with T cell dominance and without immunoglobulin or complement deposition around the blood vessels. RT-PCR analysis on peripheral blood mononuclear cells using dengue virus specific primers confirmed the diagnosis of type 3 dengue fever. PCR analysis using virus specific primers is a rapid and valuable method for making a correct diagnosis of dengue fever.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = peripheral
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4/335. Successful treatment of hiv-related vasculitis with peripheral neuropathy with short-term steroids followed by the association of zidovudine and plasmapheresis.

    OBJECTIVE--treatment of hiv-related vasculitis, avoiding prolonged immunosuppressive therapy. DESIGN--prospective pilot study of hiv-related neurological vasculitis. patients--two hiv-infected patients with histologically proven vasculitis. INTERVENTION--short-term corticosteroid followed by zidovudine combined with plasmapheresis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--clinical, biological, immunological and electromyographic evaluation. RESULTS--complete neurological recovery. CONCLUSION--excellent tolerance and efficacy of combined zidovudine and plasmapheresis therapy in peripheral neurological hiv-related vasculitis.
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ranking = 2.7645236953389
keywords = peripheral neuropathy, peripheral, neuropathy
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5/335. Vasculitic polyradiculopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    A 22 year old woman with recently diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus presented with subacute progressive areflexic paraparesis, electrophysiologically identified as a pure axonal polyradiculopathy. sural nerve biopsy disclosed necrotising vasculitis. A striking radiological feature was marked enhancement of the cauda equina with gadolinium.
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ranking = 0.0028049220103056
keywords = nerve
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6/335. Pathologic findings in a steroid-responsive optic nerve infarct in giant-cell arteritis.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the pathophysiologic mechanism of optic nerve infarction in giant-cell arteritis (GCA). BACKGROUND: Previous pathologic reports of optic nerve infarction in GCA involved patients who were blind at the time of death. The optic nerve infarcts were primarily retrolaminar in localization. Simultaneous short ciliary and ophthalmic artery vasculitis was found in all patients. methods: Clinical neurologic and ophthalmologic examination, temporal artery biopsy, and neuroimaging tests were performed in a patient with an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy secondary to GCA. Pathologic examination of the viscera, eye, and brain were performed at autopsy 1 month later. RESULTS: A prelaminar/retrolaminar infarct was found in this patient. Subsiding vasculitis was limited to the short ciliary arteries, sparing the central retinal, pial, and ophthalmic arteries. CONCLUSIONS: The authors believe that the visual improvement observed in this patient was the result of preserved, anterior optic nerve collateral circulation, as well as the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effect of the corticosteroids.
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ranking = 0.10856098249204
keywords = neuropathy, nerve
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7/335. Neurological manifestations of chronic hepatitis c.

    hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection is often associated with abnormal immunological responses. We describe four patients with vasculitic neurological signs and symptoms following HCV infection. A 56-year-old woman with HCV infection developed peripheral neuropathy characterized by asymmetric distal painful hypesthesia, dysesthesia and moderate motor weakness of the lower limbs. Serological examinations revealed cryoglobulinemia and low levels of complement c4. A biopsy of the sural nerve revealed vasculitic neuropathy. HCV infection associated immunomediated vasculitis was diagnosed. While steroid therapy was ineffective, treatment with interferon-alpha improved the neuropathy considerably without, however, eliminating HCV infection. A 62-year-old man with HCV infection developed peripheral sensory neuropathy. complement c3 was slightly diminished. Nerve biopsy revealed vasculitic neuropathy. A 71-year-old woman developed chronic symmetric sensomotor polyneuropathy. HCV hepatitis followed blood transfusions. cryoglobulins tested positive, consistent with type II cryoglobulinemia. Complements C3 and C4 were diminished. Inflammatory infiltrates in the sural nerve biopsy specimen led to the diagnosis of chronic vasculitic disorder. A 55-year-old woman with HCV infection developed vasculitis of the skin, connective tissue, visceral organs, and kidney, leading to hemodialysis. Neurologically she developed severe apathy and drowsiness, myoclonic jerks, exaggerated deep tendon reflexes, and positive pyramidal signs. magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed diffuse increased signal abnormalities involving supra- and infratentorial white matter suggesting cerebral vasculitis. cryoglobulins were positive, complements C3 and C4 slightly diminished (54 mg/dl, 4.3 mg/dl). Supportive therapy resulted in neurological improvement. Treatment with interferon-alpha was discontinued because of agranulocytosis. In patients with peripheral neuropathy or signs of leucencephalopathy, a hepatitis c associated vasculitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis.
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ranking = 1.918479723738
keywords = peripheral neuropathy, peripheral, neuropathy, nerve
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8/335. Angiitis of the central nervous system after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation?

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is only limited information about late neurological complications after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The purpose of this study is to describe a cerebral angiitis-like syndrome after allogeneic BMT. methods: Clinical and diagnostic findings of 5 BMT patients with chronic graft versus host disease and neuropathological data of 1 patient were reported. RESULTS: In the described patients, focal neurological signs and neuropsychological abnormalities occurred years after BMT. MRI revealed periventricular white matter lesions, lacunar or territorial infarctions, leukoencephalopathy, and hemorrhages. Angiitis of the central nervous system was confirmed in 1 patient at autopsy, and an angiitis-like syndrome was suspected in the other patients because of the clinical course and response to treatment. Three patients received cyclophosphamide and steroids (2 improved, 1 died), 1 patient improved after steroids alone, and 1 patient without immunosuppressive therapy deteriorated further. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that an angiitis-like syndrome of the central nervous system can be a neurological manifestation of graft versus host disease, which should be considered a possible cause of cerebral ischemic episodes and pathological MRI scans in BMT patients with graft versus host disease.
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ranking = 1.3296569184506
keywords = nervous system
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9/335. Atypical Wegener's granulomatosis with positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, ophthalmologic manifestations, and slowly progressive renal failure without respiratory tract involvement.

    A 68-year-old woman had microscopic hematuria and proteinuria since the age of 50. She also had hearing impairment, arthralgia, retinal embolism, peripheral arterial occlusion of the right foot and chronic renal failure during the course. At the age of 68, she had progressive renal failure and nephrotic syndrome with high titers of serum cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). No evidence of respiratory tract involvement was found. methylprednisolone pulse therapy and low dose cyclophosphamide therapy ameliorated the renal failure and reduced the serum c-ANCA level. She, however, died on July 19, 1998 due to pulmonary fungal and pneumocystis carinii infection.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = peripheral
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10/335. Multiple cerebral infarctions from nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis mimicking cerebral vasculitis.

    Primary vasculitis of the central nervous system (PVCNS) is an uncommon disorder that can present with a variety of symptoms, making diagnosis and management difficult. We describe a case of cerebral infarction that occurred from nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) and presented with clinical and radiologic imaging features that suggested PVCNS. The patient was a 58-year-old woman with left hemiparesis, aphasia, and episodic confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated multifocal lesions consistent with infarction involving both cerebral hemispheres, and cerebral angiography showed changes consistent with vasculitis. Although brain biopsy findings were normal, the patient was treated for presumed vasculitis with cyclophosphamide and prednisone. Four months later respiratory failure secondary to polymicrobial pneumonia and adult respiratory distress syndrome developed, and she died. autopsy revealed multiple infarcts in the heart, lungs, right kidney, spleen, and brain. Multiple thrombotic platelet-fibrin vegetations consistent with NBTE were found on all cardiac valves. Examination of the brain revealed no evidence of active or healed vasculitis. cerebral angiography may show findings that suggest vasculitis, but it is not diagnostic, as several other conditions may cause similar changes. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis may cause multiple cerebral infarctions and can be difficult to distinguish from vasculitis, as specific diagnostic tests for PVCNS are lacking.
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ranking = 0.22160948640843
keywords = nervous system
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