Cases reported "Venous Insufficiency"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/77. Temporary arterio-venous shunts to dilate saphenous crossover graft and maintain graft patency.

    A modification of the Palma operation is described in a 25-year-old man with impaired venous outflow of the right leg. After a phlebitic occlusion of the right superficial femoral and external iliac veins he had been operated on twice for varicose veins. The result of these operations was a serious outflow stasis of the right leg during exercise. A saphenous cross-over graft to the right popliteal vein was constructed. Preoperatively a temporary arterio-venous shunt between the left posterior tibial artery and the great saphenous vein had been made in order to increase the diameter of the saphenous vein. Three months later the dilated saphenous vein was resected at the level of the sapheno-tibial artery shunt and anastomosed to the popliteal vein of the right leg. The cross-over graft occluded several times during this operation. A temporary popliteo-popliteal arterio-venous shunt was established distally to the sapheno-popliteal anastomosis to keep the vein graft patent. This second arterio-venous shunt was resected after three months. Venography one month later showed that the vein graft was patent. The patient's complaints had disappeared one month after the operation and a normalization of his venous outflow was recorded plethysmographically. The graft has remained patent during an observation time of eighteen months.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/77. Local subcutaneous heparin as treatment for venous insufficiency in replanted digits.

    In the treatment of venous insufficiency unsuitable for surgical correction in replanted digits, a small ungual window was surgically created to infiltrate subcutaneous heparin in the congested digit. The initial heparin dose was 1000 units. This dose made possible a continuous bleeding during 24 to 48 hours, solely through the ungual window. Further doses were applied based on the degree of congestion of the replanted digit, but usually it was necessary to infiltrate up to 500 units of heparin every 24 to 48 hours until vascular stability was achieved. Three patients were treated with this technique. One opted for quitting the treatment. A replanted thumb suffered venous congestion on the seventh postoperative day and was treated with local subcutaneous heparin for 3 days. A replanted fingertip suffered venous thrombosis 24 hours after surgery and was treated likewise for 18 days. In these two patients, success was attained. blood transfusions were carried out in the latter two, and none had any systemic changes in partial thromboplastin or thrombin time. This treatment is based on the mechanism of action of heparin at high doses but applied only to the congested segment. Besides their anticoagulant effect through antithrombin, high doses of heparin slow platelet aggregation, may induce angiogenesis, and have a longer-than-normal half-life. With the above technique, heparin has been applied to the congested segment at an approximate dose of 33,000 to 40,000 units/kg, and continuous bleeding solely through the ungual window for 24 to 48 hours has been achieved, which has allowed us to save two replanted segments with no complications at all. This method may offer another alternative for the medical treatment of venous insufficiency in replanted segments.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.17977577762602
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/77. Reverse venous outflow of a free fibular osteocutaneous flap: a salvage procedure.

    The authors report 2 patients with a massive bony defect of the tibia due to chronic osteomyelitis. They reconstructed the defect using a free vascularized fibular osteocutaneous flap. Unfortunately, venous insufficiency was diagnosed 24 hours postoperatively. The previous anastomosed veins were promptly explored. The peroneal veins of the vascularized fibular bone graft were noted to be full of thrombi. After thrombectomy, the vessels became very fragile and broke down easily. It was impossible to achieve normal antegrade venous outflow from the previous vein of the donor graft; however, they found that distal runoff of the peroneal vein achieved a reverse venous outflow from the donor graft. The great saphenous vein was dissected and reanastomosed to achieve adequate venous drainage. This procedure may offer an alternative treatment for a flap with venous insufficiency.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.55555555555556
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/77. Chronic leg ulcers: types and treatment.

    Disorders of the arteries, veins, or nerves, alone or in combination, can result in leg ulcers. The presentation in these cases varies with the cause, which in turn guides management. A differential diagnosis is critical, because treatment that is essential for one type of ulcer may be contraindicated in another.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.11111111111111
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/77. Recurrent varicose veins of both lower limbs due to bilateral ovarian vein incompetence.

    A case of a 43-year-old female patient with mild pelvic pain and bilateral recurrent varicose veins due to incompetence of both ovarian veins is presented here. Ovarian vein incompetence was suspected from the presence of vulva varicosities and was confirmed by transvaginal ultrasound and descending ovarian venography. Treatment with transcatheter embolization of the ovarian veins was followed by local excision of the leg varices. Four years later, the patient remains asymptomatic and without any recurrence of varicose veins in both lower limbs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4444444444444
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/77. Intermittent brachiocephalic vein obstruction secondary to a thymic cyst.

    Mediastinal thymic cysts are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally on a routine chest roentgenogram. Rarely, they may cause symptoms of vascular obstruction. A 55-year-old woman presented with intermittent swelling in her left neck. The swelling was positional and was worse while supine and disappeared while upright. Evaluation revealed a thymic cyst causing extrinsic compression of the left brachiocephalic vein. The cyst was resected with complete resolution of the left neck swelling.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.55555555555556
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/77. Compression of femoral vein by the strap of a urine-collecting device in a spinal cord injury patient.

    OBJECTIVE: To report an unusual cause of femoral vein compression in a spinal cord injury (SCI) patient. DESIGN: A case report of a SCI patient in whom the strap of a urinal produced compression of femoral vein. Setting Regional spinal injuries Centre, Southport, england. SUBJECT: A 65-year old male, who had sustained paraplegia at T-10 level 33 years ago, attended the spinal unit for a routine follow-up intravenous urography (IVU). He was wearing a urinal, which was held tightly over the penis by means of two straps coursing over the inguinal regions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: IVU was performed by injecting 50 ml of Ultravist-300 via a 23-gauge butterfly needle inserted in a vein over the dorsum of the left foot. After completion of the injection, an X-ray of the pelvis was taken to evaluate the right hip. This showed contrast in the vena profunda femoris, circumflex femoral veins and inter-muscular veins with evidence of compression of proximal femoral vein. RESULTS: It was suspected that the strap holding the urinal was causing compression of the femoral vein. Therefore, a venogram was performed 5 days later, when the patient had discarded the urinal and the straps. This showed free flow of contrast through the left femoral and iliac veins. CONCLUSION: Compression of femoral vein by a strap holding the urinal was discovered serendipitously in this patient during a routine follow-up. physicians and health professionals should bear in mind this rare complication when examining spinal cord injury patients who use this type of urine collecting device, and discuss with them alternative methods for urinary drainage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4444444444444
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/77. The effect of head rotation on the diameter of the internal jugular vein: implications for free tissue transfer.

    PURPOSE: To determine the effects of medial (inwards) and lateral (outwards) rotation of the head on the transverse diameter of the internal jugular vein. MATERIAL: The original study sample included 26 patients. Duplex ultrasound was used to measure the transverse diameter of the internal jugular vein at a fixed point on either side of the neck. Measurements were taken with the head central (neutral position), rotated laterally and medially. RESULTS: Using Student's t-test we found that lateral rotation of the head produced a reduction in the mean of the transverse diameters of the left and right ipsilateral vein from 6.9 mm to 5.4 mm (p < 0.03) and 5.9 mm to 5.0 mm (p = 0.2173) respectively. One patient excluded from the study because of previous neck surgery showed complete occlusion of the ipsilateral internal jugular vein on lateral rotation of the head. CONCLUSION: There is a possibility that patency of the vein could be compromised if the head is turned laterally. This situation may arise immediately after surgery in the ventilated and paralysed patient when the head may be unsupported. It could be of particular importance if the vein has been used as a recipient vein for free tissue transfer.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2222222222222
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/77. Unrecognized internal jugular vein obstruction: cause of fatal intracranial hypertension after tracheostomy?

    We report an unusual case of fatal intracranial hypertension following tracheostomy due to the obstruction of the internal jugular veins (left side: thrombosis after central venous cannulation, right side: hypoplastic vein) and their collaterals. Principal cerebral outflow through the internal jugular veins can be substituted by the internal and external vertebral vein plexus because blood drains from the brain by two major routes: the internal jugular veins and the vertebral venous plexus. We suggest transcranial color-coded duplex sonography as a simple bedside method to detect patients with significant reduction of venous drainage who are at risk of developing massive cerebral venous congestion as a result of reduced intracranial elastance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1209870160752
keywords = thrombosis, vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/77. Endovascular treatment of iliocaval occlusion caused by retroperitoneal fibrosis: late results in two cases.

    We report two cases of iliocaval occlusion caused by retroperitoneal fibrosis; one presented acute symptoms and one chronic. Both were treated by use of transluminal angioplasty and stenting with excellent clinical, hemodynamic, and imaging results at 36 and 51 months. These cases confirm the benefit of endovascular techniques in the treatment of nonmalignant obstructive disease of large veins, and specifically in the case of retroperitoneal fibrosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.11111111111111
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Venous Insufficiency'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.