Cases reported "Venous Thrombosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/155. Spontaneous rupture of hepatic hydatid cyst causing inferior vena cava thrombosis.

    We report a patient with an infected hepatic hydatid cyst, which spontaneously ruptured into the inferior vena cava, with resultant thrombosis of the inferior vena cava, and left renal, right common iliac and right external iliac veins.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/155. Intrahepatic hemorrhage after use of low-molecular-weight heparin for total hip arthroplasty.

    Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) has become a popular agent for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and thromboembolic disease after total joint arthroplasty. LMWH allows for consistent dosing in postoperative patients without the need for laboratory monitoring. hemorrhage is an uncommon but documented adverse reaction when using LMWH; however, intrahepatic hemorrhage has not been previously reported in conjunction with LMWH therapy. We report the case of a woman who suffered intrahepatic hemorrhage presenting with acute abdominal pain and vomiting after the use of enoxaparin for total hip arthroplasty.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/155. Primary liver carcinoma complicating membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava.

    A rare autopsy case of primary liver carcinoma complicating a pre-existing, incomplete membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava (MOVC) is reported. The patient, a 67-year-old Japanese male, was admitted to hospital following a 2 year illness of a left chest wall tumor and a 3 month illness with progressive abdominal pain. Computed tomography scans of the abdomen displayed space-occupying lesions in the third and seventh hepatic segments, respectively. One month later, the patient developed edema of the lower extremities and marked venous dilatation of the abdominal trunk. At that time, Doppler examination revealed the presence of intrahepatic large venovenous collaterals. The patient subsequently succumbed 82 days after hospitalization. At subsequent autopsy, the inferior vena cava was completely obstructed by tumor thrombus, which was formed caudally and cranially to a thin membrane and mimicked the valve, with calcification and elastic lamina, at the phrenic portion. Intrahepatic large collateral pathways were found between submembranous and supramembranous hepatic veins. Anomalous absence of the ostia of the middle hepatic vein was found. In addition, the portal venous trunk was occluded by tumor thrombus. histology of hepatic tumors revealed a combined hepatocellular and cholangiocellular carcinoma in the non-cirrhotic liver with severe acute centrilobular congestion. In MOVC patients such as the case presented, malignancy-induced thrombosis was deemed to be an important factor in prognosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.0082413764028
keywords = obstruction, hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/155. Deep vein thrombosis as a presenting symptom of congenital interruption of the inferior vena cava.

    Infrahepatic interruption of the inferior vena cava is a congenital anomaly, resulting in venous drainage of the lower extremities by way of a compensatory enlarged vena azygos system. We report the case of a 37-year-old male who presented with symptoms of deep vein thrombosis of the entire right lower extremity. A right-sided mediastinal mass on the chest X-ray was mistaken for a haematological malignancy but proved later to represent an enlarged azygos vein. The case illustrates that in a case of deep vein thrombosis, especially in younger patients, interruption of the inferior vena cava should be considered. A right-sided paratracheal mass on the chest X-ray may give a clue in making the correct diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/155. portal vein thrombosis in paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria.

    A 28-year-old man was hospitalized with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and low-grade fever. He had a 6-month history of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH), and laboratory data showed anaemia and liver dysfunction. An abdominal ultrasonography showed ascites and portal vein thrombosis. After receiving antithrombotic treatment, the portal vein thrombosis did not extend. portal vein thrombosis is very rare but should be considered when we encounter liver dysfunction associated with PNH as well as hepatic vein thrombosis. ultrasonography is very useful in detecting portal vein thrombosis and facilitating early diagnosis. warfarin is very effective in preventing exacerbation of portal vein thrombosis in PNH.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/155. Trousseau's syndrome with brachiocephalic vein thrombosis in a patient with uterine carcinosarcoma. A case report.

    The authors treated a patient with the previously unreported occurrence of brachiocephalic vein and superior vena cava thrombosis in association with a distantly located cancer. A 71-year-old woman presented with swelling over the right side of the neck and abdominal distension. physical examination revealed a huge mass, and computed tomography demonstrated thrombosis of the brachiocephalic vein and superior vena cava accompanied by jugular vein dilatation. No coagulation disorder was demonstrable. After anticoagulation and thrombolysis, hysterectomy was performed; microscopic examination of the specimen revealed uterine carcinosarcoma. Even though local tumor obstruction is a much more common cause of neck vein thrombosis, a distant occult cancer can present as this form of Trousseau's syndrome. In patients with otherwise unexplained neck vein thrombosis, examination not only of the head and neck but also of the abdomen and pelvis should be pursued.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.36164827528056
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/155. tuberculosis presenting as deep vein thrombosis.

    We present two cases, women of 21 and 60 years old, who presented with deep vein thrombosis. Both cases had retroperitoneal para-aortic and iliac lymph node enlargement without any malignancy or other predisposing thrombophilic factors. Investigations revealed tubercular aetiology of the lymph nodes causing venae caval obstruction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.36164827528056
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/155. Successful recanalization of late portal vein thrombosis after liver transplantation using systemic low-dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator.

    portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is an infrequent complication following hepatic transplantation. However, deterioration of liver function and accompanying complications may be life threatening. Several attempts of surgical or percutaneous transhepatic procedures have been described. In some cases high dose fibrinolytic regimens have been successful. We describe the case of a male liver recipient with recurrent liver fibrosis due to hepatitis b reinfection and late portal vein thrombosis 45 months after transplantation. Complete recanalization was achieved using systemic low dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/155. Limitations of percutaneous techniques in the treatment of portal vein thrombosis.

    New therapeutic alternatives to portal vein thrombosis (PVT) include the percutaneous, transhepatic infusion of fibrinolytic agents, balloon dilatation, and stenting. These maneuvers have proven to be effective in some cases with acute, recent PVT. We have treated two patients with acute PVT via transhepatic or transjugular approaches and by using pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis and thrombectomy. Although both patients clinically improved, morphologic results were only fair and partial rethrombosis was observed. The limitations of percutaneous procedures in the recanalization of acute PVT in noncirrhotic patients are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/155. aged budd-chiari syndrome attributed to chronic deep venous thrombosis with alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    budd-chiari syndrome is a rare disease, but there are many known causes. Recent studies showed that it can be an acquired lesion resulting from thrombosis in some elderly patients. We report a 74-year-old man with budd-chiari syndrome attributed to chronic deep venous thrombosis and alcoholic liver cirrhosis. When he was aged 45 years, stasis ulcers of the lower extremities appeared. cerebral infarction and left hemiparesis occurred at age 71. ultrasonography, venacavography, and three-dimensional-magnetic resonance imaging on admission demonstrated total obstruction of the inferior vena cava with several massive thrombi and developed collateral vessels. Although the etiology of the thrombosis remained obscure, we made some speculative assumptions that chronic disseminated intravascular coagulation (which is frequently observed in cirrhosis) or hereditary coagulopathy could be involved, from his familial history of thrombotic phenomena and a severe deficiency of clotting inhibitors. Despite the high mortality of untreated budd-chiari syndrome reported in previous studies, this patient had been alive for about 30 years from the suspected onset.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.36164827528056
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Venous Thrombosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.