Cases reported "Vertigo"

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11/382. Spontaneous vertebral artery dissection mimicking acute vertigo. Case report.

    A patient with acute vertigo, and normal findings on neurologic examination, was found to have vertebral artery dissection (VAD). This case shows that the clinical picture of VAD can mimic vertigo of labyrinthine (i.e, peripheral) origin.
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12/382. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome.

    OBJECTIVE: To present the symptoms, signs, and findings on diagnostic tests of patients with the superior canal dehiscence syndrome and to describe the surgical procedures used to treat the dehiscence in five patients. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study of a series of patients identified as having this syndrome at a tertiary care referral center. patients AND RESULTS: Seventeen patients with vertigo, oscillopsia, or both evoked by intense sounds or stimuli that caused changes in middle ear and/or intracranial pressure were identified over a 4-year period. The evoked eye movements had vertical and torsional components, with the direction corresponding to the effect of the stimuli in causing excitation (Valsalva against pinched nostrils, tragal compression, sounds) or inhibition (Valsalva against a closed glottis or jugular venous compression) of the affected superior semicircular canal. Thirteen (76%) of these patients also experienced chronic dysequilibrium that was often the most debilitating symptom. Dehiscence of bone overlying the superior semicircular canal on the affected side was confirmed with computed tomographic scans in each case. Surgical procedures through the middle fossa approach to plug or resurface the superior canal were performed in five patients (canal plugging in three cases and resurfacing of the dehiscence without plugging in two). The debilitating symptoms resolved or improved after the procedures. Signs of vestibular hypofunction, without loss of hearing, were noted in one patient after plugging of the superior canal and in one other patient after resurfacing of the canal. CONCLUSIONS: The superior canal dehiscence syndrome is identified based on characteristic symptoms, signs, and computed tomographic findings. The clinical presentation and findings can be understood in terms of the effect of the dehiscence on the physiology of the labyrinth. The syndrome is a treatable cause of vestibular disturbance.
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13/382. An unusual complication of cochlear implant: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Three days after the initial fitting of the cochlear device a 40-year-old woman complained of severe rotational vertigo following head movements associated with neurovegetative symptoms. Otoneurological evaluation revealed a horizontal paroxysmal positional nystagmus beating towards the lowermost ear, induced by rolling the patient's head from supine both to the right or to the left lateral position suggesting the diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the left horizontal semicircular canal. The nystagmus characteristics were the same whether the cochlear device was switched on or off. The hypothesis of an otolith dislodging due to the electrical stimulation during the initial fitting is discussed.
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14/382. vertigo: analysis by magnetic resonance imaging and angiography.

    The relationship of vascular disease of the vertebrobasilar artery system to isolated vertigo was examined by magnetic resonance imaging and angiography. Eighty-nine individuals complaining of vertigo were evaluated by standard otoneurologic investigations, and the data were correlated with the vascular patterns of the cervical region and posterior fossa. The age distribution extended from the fourth decade to the ninth decade; the peak occurrence was observed in the eighth. Approximately 85% of the group experienced numerous episodes of vestibular dysfunction from months to years before examination; the remaining segment was examined following the first episode due to severity or persistence of symptoms. The criteria for vascular abnormality proposed by the authors are based upon comparison with previous normal findings. Approximately 52% of the cohort demonstrated abnormal configurations or evidence of diminished flow within the vertebrobasilar artery system. Of this segment, a vertebral artery was most frequently abnormal, in 76%; the basilar artery was judged pathological in 32%, and combined disease of several arteries was evident in 20%.
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15/382. Rotational vertebral artery occlusion syndrome with vertigo due to "labyrinthine excitation".

    Leftward head rotations in a patient with a rotational vertebral artery occlusion syndrome elicited recurrent uniform attacks of severe rotatory vertigo and tinnitus in the right ear. These attacks were accompanied by a mixed clockwise torsional downbeat nystagmus with a horizontal component toward the right. A transient ischemia of the right labyrinth probably induced the attacks and led to a combined transient excitation of the right anterior and horizontal semicircular canals as well as the cochlea.
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16/382. Cervical vertigo after hair shampoo treatment at a hairdressing salon: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report of cervical vertigo that occurred after shampoo treatment in a hairdressing salon. Abnormalities were detected on magnetic resonance images and magnetic resonance angiography scans. OBJECTIVES: To describe the diagnosis of cervical vertigo caused by neck hyperextension. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: neck hyperextension may induce vertigo and dizziness; the pathophysiology remains unclear, however, because subjective findings are usually difficult to document. methods: The diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of a patient with cervical vertigo that occurred after hair shampoo treatment in a hair dressing salon were assessed. RESULTS: magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated narrowing of the left vertebral artery, whereas magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebellar infarction. Treatment included rest and drugs that activate cerebral circulation and prevent platelet aggregation. Improvement was noted within few days. CONCLUSIONS: The authors suggest that the hyperextended neck position during hair shampoo treatment in a beauty parlor may be a risk factor for back lifting or cerebellum vascular insufficiency. Public education should lead to avoidance of this position during hair shampoo treatment at hair dressing salons.
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17/382. Prediction of vertigo recurrences in Meniere's disease by the head-shaking test.

    Researchers have observed that when head-shaking nystagmus (HSN) is provoked in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders, usually (in more than 75% of cases) it beats toward the normal or unaffected ear. The reverse of this pattern occurs commonly in patients with Meniere's disease. This finding presumably reflects the changeable pathophysiological state of the labyrinth of Meniere's disease. We retrospectively analyzed clinical records of eight patients who had unilateral Meniere's disease and came to Gunma University Hospital for consultation in the period from 1984 through 1989. All patients satisfied the following condition: In the period prior to the attacks of vertigo, for which a 10-day period preceding the attack was arbitrarily considered (the forerunning period), HSN reversed its direction, appeared, or disappeared. When HSN showed a biphasic pattern, only the first phase was considered in this present analysis. In the period before the attack, HSN reversed its direction from the normal to the morbid ear five times in four patients, appeared toward the morbid ear in three patients, and disappeared from one beating toward the normal ear before the forerunning period of vertigo attacks in one patient. These findings suggest that the occurrence of HSN directed to the morbid ear in the recuperation period in Meniere's disease might indicate the impending recurrence of a vertigo attack in a few days. In the present group of patients, vertigo attacks occurred from 6 hours to 8 days (average, 3.2 days) after the observation of HSN beating toward the morbid ear. In three of these patients, the immediate administration of isosorbide (a hyperosmotic diuretic) in this stage successfully suppressed the recurrence of vertigo attacks.
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18/382. Intractable benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in patients with Meniere's disease.

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a detailed description of the coexistence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and Meniere's disease in individuals and to offer a possible mechanism that explains the findings in these patients. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective. methods: Chart review. RESULTS: Of 162 patients diagnosed with Meniere's disease between January 1998 and January 1999, 9 were found to have both "definite" Meniere's disease and "certain" BPPV. Meniere's symptoms preceded the onset of BPPV in all of our patients. Seven of the 9 patients were female. Except for one patient who experienced BPPV bilaterally, BPPV was limited to the same ear as the Meniere's disease. All patients presented with intractable BPPV that did not respond completely to otolith repositioning procedures. A detailed description of five patients is presented. CONCLUSION: Our data, in conjunction with that of others, suggest that Meniere's disease may predispose patients to intractable BPPV. Hydropically induced damage to the maculae of the utricle and saccule or partial obstruction of the membranous labyrinth may be possible mechanisms that explain the coexistence of Meniere's disease and BPPV.
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19/382. vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss in the geriatric patient.

    OBJECTIVE: To document clinical changes after a course of chiropractic care in a geriatric patient with vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss. Clinical Features: A 75-year-old woman with a longstanding history of vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss experienced an intensified progression of these symptoms 5 weeks before seeking chiropractic care. Radiographs revealed a C3 retrolisthesis with moderate degenerative changes C4-C7. Significant decreases in audiologic function were evident, and the RAND 36 health Survey revealed subjective distress. Intervention and Outcome: The patient received upper cervical-specific chiropractic care. Paraspinal bilateral skin temperature differential analysis was used to determine when an upper cervical adjustment was to be administered. Radiographic analysis was used to determine the specific characteristics of the misalignment in the upper cervical spine. Through the course of care, the patient's symptoms were alleviated, structural and functional improvements were evident through radiographic examination, and audiologic function improved. CONCLUSION: The clinical progress documented in this report suggests that upper cervical manipulation may benefit patients who have tinnitus and hearing loss.
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20/382. Familial progressive vestibulocochlear dysfunction caused by a COCH mutation (DFNA9).

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the decline of vestibulocochlear function in a man with vestibulocochlear dysfunction caused by a Pro51Ser mutation within the COCH gene on chromosome 14q12-13 (DFNA9). methods: A follow-up of more than 15 years was performed in a single case. Clinical investigations were supplemented by oculomotor, vestibular, and auditory tests. RESULTS: A 50-year-old man had had progressive sensorineural hearing loss and dysequilibrium for 15 years; he had been asymptomatic at the age of 35 years. He suffered from instability in the dark, head movement-dependent oscillopsia, paroxysmal positional vertigo, and vertigo with and without nausea. Hearing impairment started unilaterally, predominantly in the high frequencies. He also reported tinnitus. Disease progressed to severe bilateral high-frequency hearing impairment and vestibular areflexia. Fluctuation of vestibulocochlear function was documented and mentioned by the patient. CONCLUSIONS: Our patient proved to suffer from an autosomal dominant vestibulocochlear disorder caused by a COCH gene mutation. The remarkable medical history has some features in common with meniere disease; however, there are also different clinical and neurophysiological features. In the family, phenotypic variability is present.
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