Cases reported "Vertigo"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/74. Hyperactive rhizopathy of the vagus nerve and microvascular decompression. Case report.

    A 37-year-old woman underwent microvascular decompression of the superior vestibular nerve for disabling positional vertigo. Immediately following the operation, she noted severe and spontaneous gagging and dysphagia. Multiple magnetic resonance images were obtained but failed to demonstrate a brainstem lesion and attempts at medical management failed. Two years later she underwent exploration of the posterior fossa. At the second operation, the vertebral artery as well as the posterior inferior cerebellar artery were noted to be compressing the vagus nerve. The vessels were mobilized and held away from the nerve with Teflon felt. The patient's symptoms resolved immediately after the second operation and she has remained symptom free. The authors hypothesize that at least one artery was shifted at the time of her first operation, or immediately thereafter, which resulted in vascular compression of the vagus nerve. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a hyperactive gagging response treated with microvascular decompression. The case also illustrates the occurrence of a possibly iatrogenic neurovascular compression syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/74. Solitary plasmacytoma of the skull base presenting with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    Solitary plasmacytoma of the skull base is a rare entity with only a few reported cases in the literature. We review the literature and present our experience with this lesion that produced ipsilateral sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo and ipsilateral sixth nerve palsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.125
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/74. Electron microscopic observations of the utricle and ampullae in a case of dizziness of suspected saccular origin.

    Electron microscopic observation was reported on the utricle and ampullae of a case, a 36-year-old male, with dizziness attack due to suspected saccular origin. After the removal of the utricle and ampullae, the dizziness recurred, and finally the saccular nerve section relieved the dizziness attack of this case. So the actual lesion was localized in the saccule and was not in the specimens obtained at the first surgery. Though most of hair cells appeared normal, there were a few with many vacuoles or shrinkage of the cytoplasm distributing sparsely throughout the sensory epithelia. The distribution of the pathological hair cells in the utricle was more general than in the ampullae. The sensory hair cells without pathology and the presynaptic structures were similar to those found in the experimental animals. Nerve and nerve endings showed normal structures. The findings may be physiological at this age group or an extension of the pathology of the dizziness-causing lesion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/74. Relationship between cystic change and rotatory vertigo in patients with acoustic neuroma.

    Acoustic neuromas are benign neoplasms that most often arise from the vestibular nerve. Many patients with this tumor experience some degree of vestibular symptoms. However, patients rarely complain of rotatory vertigo. Acoustic neuromas are known to exhibit a cystic appearance in some patients. It was hypothesized that cystic change might be a causative factor for rotatory vertigo. A retrospective study of 178 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma who underwent surgery in the Department of otolaryngology at tokyo Medical and Dental University was carried out. The cystic appearance of the tumors was detected preoperatively by magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery. The relationship between cystic change of the tumor and presentation with rotatory vertigo was examined. Of the 178 patients studied, only 10 had both cystic change of the tumor and rotatory vertigo, and 120 had neither cystic tumor nor rotatory vertigo. Of the remaining 48 patients, 24 experienced rotatory vertigo with negative findings for cystic tumor and the other 24 had evidence of cystic tumor but no rotatory vertigo. Tumor with cystic change was observed in 34 patients, accounting for 19.1% of all patients studied. Rotatory vertigo was also experienced in 34 patients (19.1%). Of the 34 patients with cystic lesions, 29.4% (10) had rotatory vertigo. The difference in percentage of the two groups did not reach statistical significance. It is suggested that there may be other factors causing rotatory vertigo in patients with acoustic neuromas than cystic change of the tumor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.125
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/74. Sudden unilateral hearing loss with simultaneous ipsilateral posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a variant of vestibulo-cochlear neurolabyrinthitis?

    We describe 4 patients who all simultaneously developed a sudden total or partial unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and an unusual acute peripheral vestibulopathy in the same ear characterized by posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with intact lateral semicircular canal function. Two patients also had ipsilateral loss of otolith function. The vertigo resolved in all 4 patients after particle-repositioning maneuvers. The findings of audiometry and vestibular tests indicated that the lesion responsible for this syndrome was probably located within the labyrinth itself rather than within the vestibulocochlear nerve and that it was more likely a viral vestibulocochlear neurolabyrinthitis than a labyrinthine infarction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.125
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/74. Intermittent vertebral artery compression caused by C1-root schwannoma: case report.

    Extradural schwannomas of the C1-root are extremely rare. As the tumor grows in size, it may compress surrounding neurovascular structures and cause symptoms. In the present case report, the left vertebral artery (VA) was severely compressed by the tumor, eliciting severe vertigo on turning the head to the right side and with neck extension. We report a 52-year-old man who presented with a history of intermittent episodes of severe vertigo on head movement that was caused by a C1-root schwannoma. The lesion was exposed through an extreme lateral transcondylar approach. At exposure the lesion was yellowish in color and was extradural in location lying between the markedly eroded C1-posterior arch and the compressed vertebral artery (V3) on the left side. The medial portion of the tumor was attached to the C1-nerve root. The tumor was excised enbloc with decompression of the VA. The patient's symptoms completely resolved immediately following surgery, with no recurrence of the symptoms at one year follow up. The vertebral artery may frequently be compressed by osteophytes in cervical spondylosis or due to other causes in the cervical spinal canal, but compression of the artery by C1 extradural schwannoma with vascular insufficiency is rare. Removel of the tumor and the resultant decompression of the artery can be facilitated by the extreme lateral approach as demonstrated by this case.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.125
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/74. No neurological involvement for more than 40 years in klippel-feil syndrome with severe hypermobility of the upper cervical spine.

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with klippel-feil syndrome, who showed severe hypermobility of the upper cervical spine without neurological involvement for more than 40 years. Radiographs revealed the presence of the odontoid bone and fusion of the atlas, odontoid bone, and occiput. Congenital fusion was present from the axis to C5 as a block vertebra. Lateral flexion-extension radiographs revealed severe hypermobility at the junction between the odontoid bone and the axis. Prophylactic surgical stabilization has been recommended in patients with severe hypermobility, but adjacent disc problems may possibly occur at the unfused levels in the future. We believe that early prophylactic stabilization should not be indicated for klippel-feil syndrome without neurological involvement only because of hypermobility.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0019317210519563
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/74. Proper management of the rotational vertebral artery occlusion secondary to spondylosis.

    A 66-year-old man with cervical spondylosis noticed severe vertigo when turning his head to the right. He underwent subclavian arteriography elsewhere, which showed a block of the contrast medium in the right vertebral artery (VA) at the C5/6 level when the patient turned his head to the right. After referral to our institute, however, postcontrast CT scan revealed an attenuated shadow of the venous plexus around the right VA at the C3/4 level. Repeated selective angiography with rotation of the head after visualization of the entire VA verified the level of obstruction to be at C3/4. Resection of the C4 transverse process through an anterior approach with drilling of the C3/4 spondylotic spur of the uncinate processi completely resolved the arterial impingement and the symptom. When evaluating rotational VA occlusion, dynamic angiography with selective catheterization is essential in determining which level is affected. The postcontrast CT scan is also useful because it suggests the level even without head rotation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0019317210519563
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/74. hemangioma of the porus acusticus. Impact of imaging studies: case reports.

    Hemangiomas are tumors. Hemangiomas near the geniculate ganglion or in the internal acoustic meatus are well known but rare. We present two cases of hemangiomas located at the porus acusticus, an even more rare site. MRI showed a millimeter-sized tumor, located in the porus acusticus, developing perpendicular to the axis of the acoustico-facial nerves, surrounding them. They were hyperintense on T1-weighted images, strongly hyperintense on T2-weighted images with a characteristic progressive and marked enhancement after injection of gadolinium dtpa. Similar signal abnormalities were present in the adjacent temporal bone, and CT scan demonstrated a honeycomb appearance with intratumoral bony spicules. These imaging criteria allows differentiation between hemangioma and neurinoma. We hypothesize that this location is related to the presence of a rich vascular plexus of the dura mater in this area.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.125
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/74. Trauma to the temporal bone: diagnosis and management of complications.

    The temporal bone contains important sensory and neural structures that may be damaged in patients who experience craniofacial trauma. The most serious complications of temporal bone trauma include facial nerve paralysis, cerebrospinal fluid leak, and hearing loss. Injury to the temporal bone often presents with subtle signs and symptoms, such as otorrhea, facial palsy, and hemotympanum. A high index of suspicion and a thorough knowledge of how to diagnose injury to the temporal bone are paramount in treating patients who present to the emergency room with craniofacial trauma. This article provides an overview of temporal bone trauma, outlines a methodical approach to the patient with temporal bone trauma, details four cases, and describes the treatment of complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.125
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Vertigo'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.