Cases reported "Vibrio Infections"

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1/48. The use of a modified Dakin's solution (sodium hypochlorite) in the treatment of vibrio vulnificus infection.

    We report the first clinical use of a modified Dakin's solution (0.025% sodium hypochlorite [NaOCl]) to halt the progress of severe cutaneous vibrio vulnificus infection in a critically ill patient. The regimen used arose from an initial in vitro study designed to examine the sensitivity of Vibrio species to topical antimicrobial agents. Twenty-eight wound isolates were tested against the following eight topical preparations: silver sulfadiazine (Silvadene), nitrofurazone, mupirocin ointment (Bactroban), polymyxin b/bacitracin, mafenide acetate (Sulfamylon), nystatin/Silvadene, nystatin/polymyxin b/bacitracin, and 0.025% NaOCl solution. The results showed that V vulnificus, along with the other 18 Vibrio species tested, was most sensitive to the modified NaOCl solution.
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keywords = wound
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2/48. Compartment syndrome of the forearm as the initial symptom of systemic vibrio vulnificus infection.

    sepsis, cellulitis, and necrotizing fasciitis rarely have been described as causes of compartment syndrome. We report a case in which forearm compartment syndrome presented as the initial symptom of systemic infection. vibrio vulnificus, the etiologic pathogen of the compartment syndrome, was isolated from wound and blood cultures. The patient was treated with systemic antibiotic treatment and multiple forearm fasciotomies. The infectious process progressed rapidly, however and due to underlying liver insufficiency, the patient died of hepatorenal syndrome. This case illustrates the nature of V. vulnificus infections, which are characterized by shellfish transmission, predilection for soft tissue seeding, and a fulminant course in the compromised host.
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keywords = wound
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3/48. Primary vibrio vulnificus bacteremia in a liver transplant recipient after ingestion of raw oysters: caveat emptor.

    vibrio vulnificus is responsible for severe infections in chronically ill patients. Organ transplant recipients are also at risk for severe infections due to V vulnificus. We report here the first case of V. vulnificus primary bacteremia due to raw shellfish consumption in a liver transplant recipient. All transplant patients should be cautioned against consuming uncooked seafood and warned about the risk of severe vibrio infections from seemingly innocuous wounds acquired in a salt water environment.
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keywords = wound
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4/48. Vibrio ocular infections on the U.S. Gulf Coast.

    PURPOSE: To describe the epidemiology of Vibrio eye infections. METHOD: We reviewed the records of a patient from our institution with V. vulnificus keratitis and conducted a literature search for other cases of ocular infections with Vibrio species. RESULTS: A 39-year-old fisherman was struck in his left eye with an oyster shell fragment, developed suppurative V. vulnificus keratitis, and was successfully treated with combined cefazolin and gentamicin. Including our patient, 17 cases of eye infections with Vibrio spp. have been reported, and 11 (65%) involved exposure to seawater or shellfish. Of the seven cases due to V. vulnificus (six keratitis and one endophthalmitis), six had known exposure to shellfish or seawater along the U.S. coast of the gulf of mexico. Of five cases of V. alginolyticus conjunctivitis, three had been exposed to fish or shellfish. Three infections with V. parahaemolyticus (one keratitis and two endophthalmitis) were reported; two of these occurred in people exposed to brackish water on or near the Gulf Coast. Two cases of postsurgical endophthalmitis, one with V. albensis and one with V. fluvialis, also were reported. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to septicemia, gastroenteritis, and wound infections, halophilic noncholera Vibrio species can cause sight-threatening ocular infections. Ocular trauma by shellfish from contaminated water is the most common risk factor for Vibrio conjunctivitis and keratitis. Nearly one half of reported vibrio infections of the eye occurred along the U.S. coast of the gulf of mexico.
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ranking = 372.21434116546
keywords = wound infection, wound
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5/48. A case of fatal food-borne septicemia: can family physicians provide prevention?

    BACKGROUND: vibrio vulnificus, a common bacteria found in undercooked seafood and seawater, is the leading cause of food-borne death in florida. Fatal cases of V vulnificus infection have also been reported in most states. methods: The literature was searched using the key words "vibrio vulnificus," "septicemia," "wound infections," "seafood," "immunocompromise," and "patient education." A case of fatal V vulnificus septicemia is described. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: V vulnificus, part of the natural flora of temperate coastal waters and one of the most abundant microorganisms found in seawater, has been isolated from waters off the Gulf, Pacific, and Atlantic coasts of the united states. Infections in noncoastal regions have been traced to consumption of seafood derived from Gulf Coast waters. seawater exposure and consumption of inadequately cooked seafood are routes most commonly associated with V vulnificus infection. Exposure to V vulnificus is life-threatening for chronically ill or immunocompromised patients, who are most likely to develop fatal septicemia. Currently a combination of doxycycline and intravenous ceftazidime is recommended treatment. mortality rates from V vulnificus continue to be high in immunocompromised patients. family physicians can help prevent this outcome by counseling high-risk patients.
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ranking = 372.21434116546
keywords = wound infection, wound
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6/48. Isolation of vibrio parahaemolyticus from a knee wound.

    This is a case report of a contamination of an injured knee with an unusual organism, vibrio parahaemolyticus, that is likely to occur in patients living in coastal areas but often overlooked. The infection apppears to be sensitive to a number of antibiotics and very likely cured, whether recognized or not as the proper organism.
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keywords = wound
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7/48. A fatal case of vibrio vulnificus presenting as septic arthritis.

    vibrio vulnificus is an invasive gram-negative bacillus that may cause necrotizing cellulitis, bacteremia, and/or sepsis. Although V vulnificus infection is uncommon, it is frequently fatal and is usually attributed to ingestion of raw shellfish or traumatic exposure to a marine environment; patients are also often found to have a hepatic disorder (cirrhosis, alcohol abuse, or hemochromatosis) or an immunocompromised health status, and most commonly present with septicemia or a wound infection. We describe a patient who presented with septic arthritis as the first clinical manifestation of a V vulnificus infection. The organism was subsequently identified in a synovial fluid aspirate.
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ranking = 372.21434116546
keywords = wound infection, wound
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8/48. upper extremity infections following common carp fish (cyprinus carpio) handling.

    upper extremity infection caused by aquatic pathogens on fish is a well recognized clinical entity. We report five consecutive cases of upper extremity infections, ranging from a simple localized reaction to a life-threatening systemic illness, which developed after handling common carp fish (Cyprinus carpio). In four cases, infection occurred following a penetrating injury by either the bones or the fin spines of the fish. vibrio vulnificus was isolated from wound aspirates in four cases. Early broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is mandatory. Deterioration in the clinical condition or a poor response to conservative treatment requires a meticulous surgical drainage and excision of both infected and necrotic tissues.
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keywords = wound
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9/48. vibrio vulnificus septicemia and leg ulcer.

    vibrio vulnificus is a gram-negative bacteria that can cause septicemia, wound infection, or a self-limiting diarrhea. This infection typically presents as an extremely virulent infection in patients with underlying liver disease 1 to 2 days after exposure. We report a case of V vulnificus septicemia, cellulitis, and leg ulceration in a patient who had symptoms develop after exposure to brackish water (19 days before admission) or after ingestion of raw oysters (10 days before admission). The longest incubation period previously reported is 6 days. The diagnosis was made from identification of the bacteria from blood cultures. No organisms were seen or grown in culture from the skin biopsy specimen, which showed epidermal necrosis and dermal and subcutaneous neutrophilic abscess. We review 13 cases of V vulnificus septicemia and leg ulcers and their approximate incubation time.
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ranking = 372.21434116546
keywords = wound infection, wound
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10/48. wound infection due to vibrio vulnificus in spain.

    vibrio vulnificus is a gram-negative rod that can cause septicaemia and skin lesions, usually in patients with underlying illnesses such as chronic liver disease or diabetes mellitus. Infections caused by this bacterium are unusual in spain. A case of skin infection due to vibrio vulnificus is reported in a patient whose abraded skin on his left leg came into contact with seawater. The patient died suddenly, probably due to septicaemia or bacteraemia caused by this organism. vibrio vulnificus infection must be considered in the differential diagnosis of septicaemia, skin lesions and wound infections, particularly when a patient reports a history of contact with seawater.
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ranking = 372.21434116546
keywords = wound infection, wound
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