Cases reported "Vision, Low"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/13. Compressive optic nerve atrophy resulting from a distorted internal carotid artery.

    An 18-month-old female with right compressive optic nerve atrophy caused by an ipsilateral distorted internal carotid artery is reported. She was referred to an ophthalmologist at 8 months of age with the complaint of unilateral visual loss. neuroimaging studies should contribute markedly to the determination of the causes of visual problems in young children.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/13. Complete visual recovery in osteopetrosis by early optic nerve decompression.

    Visual loss with optic atrophy is common in osteopetrosis. The efficacy of optic nerve decompression in patients with osteopetrosis is still controversial. The purpose of this study is to report that visual deterioration in osteopetrosis can be completely reversed by early optic nerve decompression. An 8-year-old female patient with osteopetrosis was found to have reduced visual acuity on routine ophthalmologic examination. Extensive optic nerve decompression was performed. It not only included unroofing the optic canal, but also drilling away bone on both sidewalls of the optic nerve. Both optic nerves were decompressed during the same surgical procedure. Progressive loss of vision associated with osteopetrosis can be prevented by optic nerve decompression in the early stage of visual deterioration. When managing patients with osteopetrosis, the importance of careful and regular assessment of visual function should be stressed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/13. Increased visual impairment after exercise (Uhthoff's phenomenon) in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic possibilities.

    The Uhthoff symptom, a transient impairment of visual function after exercise, is demonstrated in 2 multiple sclerosis patients. Following exercise, impairment of visual function, as documented most clearly by the testing of contrast sensitivity, was less obvious after body surface cooling and after treatment with orally administered 4-aminopyridine. It is hypothesized that both treatment modalities improve the nerve conduction safety factor and thereby prevent the occurrence of a conduction block, which is believed to be the mechanism underlying the Uhthoff symptom.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.20585135838309
keywords = nerve, block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/13. sphenoid sinus mucocele with recurrent visual disturbance.

    We present a case of sphenoid sinus mucocele with recurrent visual disturbance on the same side. A 22-year-old female showed two episodes of visual disturbance in the left eye for 3 months, and acute retrobulbar optic neuritis was diagnosed. With corticosteroid, visual disturbance improved in 1 week. MRI and CT scans showed mucocele in the left sphenoid sinus, and left optic nerve swelling with high intensity was observed in T2-weighted MRI. No destruction of the optic canal was found. The contiguous inflammation in the optic nerve rather than compression was considered as pathogenesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/13. The value of white blood cell count in patients with swollen discs.

    BACKGROUND: A broad differential diagnosis has to be considered in a patient with swollen discs. myeloproliferative disorders such as leukemia and lymphoma can in rare cases cause infiltrative optic neuropathy. history AND SIGNS: Two patients initially presented with slowly progressive severe visual loss. history was unremarkable except for previously noted slightly elevated white blood cell count for which - according to their general physicians - no treatment or work-up was required. At presentation, bilateral disc swelling was present. magnetic resonance imaging showed enhancement of the entire optic nerves sparing the chiasm. No other intracranial lesion was found. cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells. THERAPY AND OUTCOME: After bone marrow aspiration the diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and granulocytic leukemia, respectively, was made. Treatment resulted in visual recovery. CONCLUSION: work-up in a patient with swollen discs should always include white blood cell count. If the result is abnormal further exploration should be pursued. Elevated white blood cell count may be the only hint of optic nerve infiltration caused by a myeloproliferative disorder and its treatment can result in remarkable recovery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/13. arachnoid cyst of the optic nerve: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: To report a case of an arachnoid cyst of the optic nerve with homonymous optic atrophy. history AND SIGNS: A 17-year-old female patient presented with severe visual loss, limited to light perception, of the left eye. She underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, color fundus photography and electrophysiological study. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a fusiform structure involving the left optic nerve from the orbital apex to the posterior surface of the globe. The clinical and radiographic features are consistent with an arachnoid cyst of the optic nerve. THERAPY AND OUTCOME: The patient refused to be treated. Two years later, the VA remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: The arachnoid cyst of the optic nerve is a rare entity. Its differential diagnosis from the primary optic nerve glioma is difficult and important to be made in order to be treated properly.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.8
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/13. Corticosteroid treatment for melanoma-associated retinopathy: effect on visual acuity and electrophysiologic findings.

    BACKGROUND: Visual disturbance in the course of melanoma is rare. Specific localized metastases and drug toxic effects are frequently the cause. Recognition of a retinopathy raises several questions when the diagnosis of melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR) can be confirmed. Descriptions of such patients in dermatologic literature are rare and deserve attention because therapeutic decisions are mandatory. OBSERVATIONS: A 70-year-old woman had a first melanoma in 1985 and a second primary melanoma in 1994. Axillary lymph node involvement occurred in November 2000, leading to surgery and chemotherapy. In December 2001, she had sudden bilateral visual loss, with shimmering blobs of color and flickering photopsias. Computed tomography and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging ruled out localized tumor on the eyes or optic nerves or evolution of disease. Ophthalmologic examination revealed a bilateral posterior uveitis, with hyalitis and progressive destruction of retinal pigment. The electrophysiologic data confirmed the diagnosis of MAR. Symptoms improved after systemic corticosteroid therapy, with no relapse after tapering doses despite worsening of melanoma. CONCLUSIONS: As a rare paraneoplastic visual syndrome possibly leading to blindness, MAR is characterized by bipolar cell involvement without photoreceptor cell impairment. Also, MAR is linked to the presence of autoantibodies directed against melanoma antigens that cross-react with the rod bipolar cells of the retina. Corticosteroid therapy is rarely beneficial. Our case of MAR is noteworthy because it involved a woman, was associated with an uveitis, and improved with corticosteroid therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/13. Delayed visual deterioration after pituitary surgery--a review introducing the concept of vascular compression of the optic pathways.

    BACKGROUND: Delayed visual deterioration after pituitary surgery has been attributed to secondary empty sella syndrome and downward herniation of the optic nerves and chiasm, but the pathophysiological basis of this condition is still a matter of debate. review: According to the literature, prior radiation therapy, previous visual impairment and transcranial surgery constitute risk factors for delayed visual deterioration. radiation-induced vascular changes and/or strangulation of the optic nerves or chiasm are thought to compromise local blood flow. Downward herniation of the optic pathways was present in the majority of cases, but did not correlate with visual symptoms and signs, while dense scarring of the chiasm was a reproducable finding in all surgically explored cases. Indentations in the upper margin of the optic nerves or chiasm caused by the A1 segments of the anterior cerebral arteries have been reported repeatedly. As perichiasmal scarring constitutes the most consistent finding, the intimate relationship between artery and nerve with consecutive pulsatile pressure may constitute a causative factor in delayed visual dysfunction after pituitary surgery. The authors therefore introduce the concept of vascular compression, which is illustrated with a personal case of a successful decompression procedure with teflon interposition between the A1 segment and the non-herniated optic nerve to treat visual loss eight months following removal of a hemorrhagic pituitary adenoma. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should be aware that surgical exploration via a transcranial approach is indicated in cases of progressive visual loss late after pituitary surgery, no matter whether downward displacement of the optic pathways is present on imaging studies or not. Special attention should be paid intra-operatively to the dissection of the intimate relationship between the anterior cerebral arteries and the optic nerves and chiasm.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/13. Neurocardiogenic syncope in chronic atrioventricular block.

    We report a 37-year-old man with type I second-degree atrioventricular (AV) block (atypical Wenckebach's periodicity) referred to our department for pacemaker implantation because of an episode of syncope. After exhaustive evaluation, including electrophysiological test, in which Wenckebach's cycles with block within the AV node was demonstrated, syncope was considered to be neurally mediated. head-up tilt testing with sublingual isosorbide dinitrate was positive. The decrease in atrial rate at the beginning of the vasovagal reaction was not immediately accompanied by a depressed AV node conduction. Only at the moment of syncope did incomplete AV block appear. This observation illustrates (1) a neurally mediated origin of syncope in a patient with chronic AV block, and (2) the different time-course responses of the sinus and AV nodes to autonomic tone.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.04681086706474
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/13. Adalimumab-associated optic neuritis.

    We present, to our knowledge, the first published cases of optic neuritis associated with adalimumab, a medication in the class of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists. Approved in recent years by the FDA, adalimumab (Humira, Abbott laboratories; Abbott Park, IL) is a recombinant monoclonal antibody that targets and blocks the physiologic effects of TNF. Other TNF antagonists have had associations with optic neuritis and demyelinating events.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0058513583830925
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Vision, Low'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.