Cases reported "Vocal Cord Paralysis"

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1/218. Sudden recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis due to apoplexy of parathyroid adenoma.

    Neoplastic lesions of the parathyroid are rare, and most of these are adenomas. Even rarer is a secondary involvement of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. A case is presented of sudden onset hoarseness in a 64-year-old man caused by acute vocal cord paralysis due to bleeding within an adenoma of the lower right parathyroid gland. Acute onset of vocal cord paralysis is rarely associated with benign processes; the current case is only the second report associated with parathyroid adenoma.
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2/218. recovery of function after intracordal autologous fat injection for unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis.

    The present report documents the successful outcome in three patients with a unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis managed with an intracordal injection of autologous fat who ultimately experienced a complete recovery of function. Such data demonstrates the safety of intracordal autologous fat injection in patients who ultimately recover function.
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3/218. Computerized tomography of the glottis after intracordal autologous fat injection.

    According to the committee on speech, voice, and swallowing disorders of the American Academy of otolaryngology-head and neck Surgery, various surgical methods such as laryngeal framework surgery, laryngeal re-innervation, and injection laryngoplasty might be used to palliate inferior laryngeal nerve paralysis. In the present case report we document the survival and exact location of the boluses of autologous fat in one patient in whom this material was used for injection laryngoplasty.
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4/218. recurrent laryngeal nerve injury caused by a laryngeal mask airway.

    Although there have been few reports of serious complications with the laryngeal mask airway, we record a case of permanent unilateral vocal cord paralysis following the use of a laryngeal mask airway and review the literature describing injuries, not only to the recurrent laryngeal nerves but also to the hypoglossal and lingual nerves.
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5/218. Bilateral recurrent nerve paralysis associated with multinodular substernal goiter: a case report.

    Substernal goiter is an infrequent occurrence and is found in two to five per cent of all patients undergoing thyroid surgery. These lesions are well known to cause respiratory symptoms and alterations in phonation due to direct compression of airway structures. Infrequently, unilateral recurrent nerve palsy has been reported in patients with substernal goiter. We report a case of bilateral recurrent nerve palsy associated with multinodular substernal goiter in an 89-year-old female who presented in respiratory distress.
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6/218. Paroxysmal laryngospasm after laryngeal nerve injury.

    OBJECTIVE: Describe a clinical syndrome of laryngeal hypersensitivity following laryngeal nerve injury. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of six patients with laryngeal paralysis sustained during neck surgery who presented with paroxysms of coughing and stridor, progressing to brief episodes of complete airway occlusion. methods: Chart review. RESULTS: Superior laryngeal nerve blockade temporarily improved symptoms in four of five patients. Botulinum toxin relieved spasm in two of three patients and reduced symptoms in the third. Symptoms gradually diminished or resolved in four patients from 1 to 2.5 years later. One patient underwent arytenoidectomy and one patient has a tracheostomy. CONCLUSIONS: patients with laryngeal injury may present with stridor and acute airway obstruction secondary to paroxysmal laryngospasm. The authors have found that superior laryngeal nerve blockade or botulinum toxin may be effective in temporary relief of symptoms.
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7/218. Left vocal cord paralysis as a primary manifestation of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a nonimmunocompromised host.

    We report the first case (to our knowledge) of vocal cord paralysis as a primary manifestation of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, which occurred in a 69-year-old woman without immunodeficiency. Her chest radiograph showed left upper lobe infiltration with pleural thickening, and a computed tomogram of her chest showed a thick pleural reaction and fibrosis around the arch of the aorta. A transbronchial biopsy specimen revealed aspergillus infection. The patient was treated with oral itraconazole. However, since vocal cord paralysis persisted, the patient underwent type I thyroplasty to improve vocal function. A review of the literature showed that the incidence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis has increased, even in nonimmunocompromised subjects, and that the disease has a potential for recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Therefore, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis should be considered in patients with vocal cord paralysis.
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8/218. Neuralgic amyotrophy presenting with bilateral vocal cord paralysis in a child: a case report.

    Acute stridor and bilateral vocal cord paralysis is not uncommon in the neonate but is unusual in the older child. We report the first case of bilateral vocal cord paralysis secondary to neuralgic amyotrophy, a peripheral polyneuropathy, in a 5-year-old child. An extensive workup revealed a paralyzed right hemidiaphragm, arm weakness and an EMG pattern consistent with neuralgic amyotrophy. Neuralgic amyotrophy is an uncommon disorder in pediatric patients which may involve cranial and peripheral nerves including the phrenic nerves and rarely the recurrent laryngeal nerves. We propose that the diagnosis be considered in children who present with bilateral vocal cord paralysis and other associated neurologic findings.
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9/218. Invasion of the recurrent laryngeal nerve by adenoid cystic carcinoma. An unusual cause of true vocal fold paralysis.

    True vocal fold paralysis and goitre are both common problems encountered in ENT practice. Their co-existence, however, should arouse suspicion of the presence of malignant thyroid disease. A rare case of true vocal fold paralysis caused by a clinically occult subglottic adenoid cystic carcinoma, in a 72-year-old, is described. The existence of multinodular goitre in this patient was co-incidental and confounded the diagnostic process.
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10/218. Transient left vocal cord paralysis during laparoscopic surgery for an oesophageal hiatus hernia.

    A 45-year-old male, with symptoms of many years standing of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, was subjected, under general anaesthesia, to laparoscopic fundoplication. Tracheal intubation yielded no problems but great difficulties were encountered during tube insertion into the oesophagus. After surgery, aphonia developed. Laryngological examination demonstrated paralysis of the left vocal cord. voice strength returned to the pre-operative status after 3 months, and laryngological examination confirmed normal mobility of both cords. The possible cause of the complication was damage to the left recurrent laryngeal nerve which occurred during insertion of the tube into the oesophagus. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease causing 'acid laryngitis' can create conditions favouring this type of complication.
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