Cases reported "Vomiting"

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1/34. Intramural hematoma of the esophagus: a complication of carbon tetrachloride intoxication with acute renal failure.

    Following a period of prolonged severe vomiting, an intramural esophageal hematoma could be demonstrated by endoscopy and by X-ray in a 21 year old patient with hepatic and renal failure after exposure to carbon tetrachloride. The hematoma resolved spontaneously. The intramural hematoma is thought to have developed from a microdissection of the esophageal wall in the presence of a hemorrhagic diathesis.
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keywords = esophagus
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2/34. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis associated with esophageal perforation.

    We report a rare case of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis with lower esophageal stricture which perforated into the peritoneal cavity after the patient vomited. A 61-year-old man was admitted with severe chest and epigastric pain after dysphagia and vomiting. Under a diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal perforation, laparotomy was performed. The anterior wall of the abdominal esophagus was found to have ruptured, and proximal gastrectomy with abdominal esophagectomy was performed. Histological examination revealed esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis with esophageal stricture distal to the site of rupture, and postoperative endoscopy showed diffuse pseudodiverticulosis in the remaining esophagus. The patient is free of symptoms 5 years after the surgery. This case suggests that careful treatment may be indicated in patients with esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis with stricture and elevated intraluminal pressure, to minimize the possibility of severe complications such as esophageal perforation.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = esophagus
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3/34. Boerhaave syndrome: report of a case treated non-operatively.

    An unique case of Boerhaave's syndrome is presented in which the patient survived without any surgical treatment. We believe that this was due to non-contamination of the mediastinal and pleural cavities as shown by serial contrast roentgenograms of the esophagus.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = esophagus
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4/34. Coexisting achalasia and paraoesophageal hiatal hernia.

    Disorders of the oesophagus present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The presenting symptoms of dysphagia, reflux, pain and vomiting are almost universal, irrespective of the underlying pathology. A combination of endoscopy, barium studies, pH studies and manometry are often required to determine the exact diagnosis and to plan the most effective treatment. Paraoesophageal hiatal hernia is an uncommon condition, present in 14% of all hiatal hernias, which requires urgent correction to prevent life-threatening complications. It is unusual for other oesophageal disorders to coexist. We present a case where achalasia and a paraoesophageal hiatal hernia probably coexisted.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = esophagus
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5/34. Two cases of submucosal haematoma of the oesophagus and Mallory-Weiss tear.

    Submucosal haematoma of the oesophagus is an uncommon condition which may be under-recognised. Presentation may be with chest pain, dysphagia or haematemesis. endoscopy, CT scan, barium meal or a combination of these modalities makes the diagnosis. Most patients make a full recovery.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = esophagus
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6/34. Spontaneous perforation of the cervical esophagus.

    A rare case of spontaneous rupture of the cervical esophagus occurred during vomiting after eating. The plain x-ray film showed air in the neck, but barium swallow did not reveal the perforation. Operation performed two days later because of bleeding consisted of suturing two rents in the anterior wall of the cervical esophagus distal to the cricopharyngeus muscle, and the patient did well. The mechanism causing such a perforation is not well understood. With the absence of bleeding, treatment would ordinarily consist of drainage without suture.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = esophagus
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7/34. Barrett's esophagus and squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with psychogenic vomiting.

    We report the association of Barrett's esophagus and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the distal esophagus in a young 31-yr-old woman with a history of self-induced psychogenic vomiting. The development of intestinalized columnar mucosa and esophageal cancer in this young patient illustrates the complicated associations between human behavior and pathogenetic mechanisms involved in esophageal carcinogenesis.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = esophagus
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8/34. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus using low dose continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin: results of a prospective study.

    BACKGROUND: Surgery is the treatment of choice for localized esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Despite curative surgical resection, the majority of patients develop local and systemic recurrence with poor 5-year survival. AIMS: To study the role of low dose continuous infusion (CI) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy in ESCC. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A non-randomized prospective study conducted over a period of two years (1996-1998) in the Department of Surgery, All india Institute of Medical Sciences, india. MATERIAL AND methods: Twenty-two patients with ESCC were included in the study. Chemotherapy consisted of a continuous 30-day infusion of 5-FU (350 mg/m2/day) and cisplatin (7.5 mg/m2/day), 5 days/week for 4 weeks. All patients had surgery following chemotherapy. RESULTS: A full course of chemotherapy was completed in 18 patients (82%). Chemotherapy was not completed due to non-compliance (n=2), thrombophlebitis (n=1), and vomiting (n=1). Grade-1 haematological and hepato-toxicity was observed in four patients. Thirteen patients developed thrombophlebitis. After chemotherapy, improvement in dysphagia was observed in 13 of 22 (59%) patients. Radiological partial response was observed in 8 patients (36.4%). 19 patients underwent surgical resection (86.4%) with zero mortality. Post-operative morbidity was observed in six patients (27%). Complete and partial pathological response was observed in two (11%) and one patient (5.5%) respectively. The overall median survival was 18 months and 4-year survival was 42%. CONCLUSIONS: Low dose CI 5-FU and cisplatin is well tolerated with minimal toxicity. Histopathological response rates and survival figures are comparable with the more toxic neoadjuvant chemotherapeutic regimens.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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9/34. Spontaneous esophageal submucosal hematoma in which the course could be observed endoscopically.

    A 66-year-old man was hospitalized after vomiting blood after inducing vomiting using his fingers due to laryngeal discomfort. Upper digestive tract endoscopy revealed a large, dark red mass that connected from the upper esophagus to the lower esophagus. Esophageal submucosal hematoma was diagnosed using endoscopy, X-ray images, a small-diameter ultrasonic probe, and chest CT scanning. Pain from the epigastrium to the larynx disappeared after 3 days. melena occurred on Day 3. Endoscopic examination revealed that the hematoma had collapsed over a wide area. Endoscopic examination after one week showed that the mucous membrane covering the hematoma had peeled away revealing an extensive shallow ulcer in the esophagus. Endoscopic examination after one month confirmed the ulcer had scarred and healed.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = esophagus
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10/34. Cecal retention of a swallowed penny mimicking appendicitis in a healthy 2 year old.

    Toddlers commonly ingest coins. Studies of the evaluation and management of such ingestions have focused on the risk of complications from impaction in the esophagus. It is commonly assumed that coins that have passed through the esophagus present little or no risk for distal complications. We present the first report of cecal retention of a penny in a previously healthy 2 year old, ultimately resulting in surgical intervention.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = esophagus
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