Cases reported "Vomiting"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/7. Psychogenic vomiting: report of two cases.

    Two patients were admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of psychogenic vomiting of more than 9 months' duration. Both were treated with a combination of pharmacotherapy, relaxation training, cognitive therapy and supportive psychotherapy. Behavioral therapy and verbal catharsis were also used in one of the cases involving bereavement. The intervention was not directly aimed at the vomiting, but at the aspects of the patients' stress and emotional problems. Change in condition was assessed on basis of the frequency of vomiting and the severity of anxiety and depression. vomiting was found to be positively related to anxiety but not to depression. These 2 patients improved to the extent that the disturbance caused by vomiting was significantly reduced, and the reduction was closely related to the severity of anxiety. Both were also found to have similar personality traits and family types, which have been reported to be related to psychogenic vomiting. We review the characteristics of psychogenic vomiting and relate some important considerations for treating Chinese psychogenic vomiting cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = psychotherapy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/7. Testing the psychogenic vomiting diagnosis. Four pediatric patients.

    We treated four patients with chronic vomiting during childhood in whom a tentative diagnosis of psychogenic vomiting was made after an extensive evaluation. In each case, the diagnosis was reconsidered during the course of treatment, as observations about the patients and their response to interventions accumulated. In three instances, these observations did not fit those expected if the diagnosis of psychogenic vomiting was correct. This led to a reexamination of the organic evaluation and the discovery of an undiagnosed organic contribution to the vomiting. In the fourth patient, gastric emptying studies confirmed that there was a strong psychological contribution to the vomiting, and helped to more carefully define this contribution. Family and individual psychotherapy and treatment were aided by the greater clarity in diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = psychotherapy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/7. A treatment strategy for psychogenic vomiting.

    Although the literature supports the existence of psychogenic vomiting as a distinct psychiatric disorder, the DSM III-R does not include it as a diagnostic category. Of the numerous articles in the literature which describe this disorder, few discuss treatment. The purposes of this paper are to review the existing literature, to describe the family dynamics which are thought to precipitate the evolution of psychogenic vomiting in the identified patient, and to describe a treatment protocol which has been successfully employed in an outpatient setting. The illness is characterized as an eating disorder in terms of etiology, symptomatology, and treatment. A treatment strategy is described which includes insight-oriented psychotherapy with cognitive/behavioral interventions and family therapy. Two case studies are included which illustrate that a combined therapy approach is efficacious in treating psychogenic vomiting.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = psychotherapy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/7. psychotherapy during radiotherapy: effects on emotional and physical distress.

    The authors determined the effects of ongoing weekly individual psychotherapy on the symptoms of patients undergoing a 6-week course of radiotherapy for cancer. Forty-eight patients were given weekly psychotherapy sessions for 10 weeks; another 52 patients served as control subjects. A statistically significant reduction was found in both emotional and "physical" manifestations of distress in the patients receiving psychotherapy compared with the control group. This was true regardless of gender, ward or private patient status, or knowledge of diagnosis. Patient gender and knowledge of diagnosis did affect the pattern and magnitude of the response to psychotherapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = psychotherapy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/7. Severe vomiting in a diabetic woman. Psychological considerations.

    A 50-year-old diabetic woman experiencing 20 episodes of vomiting each day was admitted to the hospital. When vigorous medical management failed to control the vomiting, psychiatric consultation indicated that psychological factors, especially displaced anger and an early childhood history of gastrointestinal sensitivity, combined with autonomic neuropathy and uremia to produce the symptom. A multimodal treatment regimen including continued medical management, supportive psychotherapy, relaxation training and mental imagery exercises effected a dramatic improvement.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = psychotherapy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/7. Group psychotherapy during radiotherapy: effects on emotional and physical distress.

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether group psychotherapy during radiotherapy for cancer significantly decreases patients' emotional and physical distress. METHOD: Twenty-four patients receiving radiotherapy were randomly selected for group psychotherapy (six patients per group, 90-minute weekly sessions for 10 weeks). Another 24 patients served as control subjects. Each patient was given the Schedule for Affective Disorders and schizophrenia (SADS) at the onset of radiotherapy, midway through radiotherapy, at the end of radiotherapy, and 4 and 8 weeks after radiotherapy ended. RESULTS: The combined SADS items for depression, pessimism and hopelessness, somatic preoccupation and worry, social isolation and withdrawal, insomnia, and anxiety and agitation were used as a measure of emotional distress. The combined SADS items for anorexia, nausea and vomiting, and fatigue were used as a measure of physical distress. By 4 weeks after the end of radiotherapy, the patients who received group psychotherapy showed significant decreases in both emotional and physical symptoms, and the decreases were greater than those for the control patients. The subjects who initially seemed unaware of their cancer diagnoses had the lowest baseline levels of emotional and physical distress, but 4 weeks after the end of radiotherapy they had high distress levels. CONCLUSIONS: Group therapy may enhance quality of life for cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy by reducing their emotional and physical distress. The degree to which patients acknowledge the diagnosis of malignancy may be a factor in their initial distress level and their response to radiotherapy and group therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = psychotherapy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/7. Psychogenic vomiting 1976-1981, follow-up treatment results up to 1996.

    During the period from 1976 to 1981, six children suffering from severe vomiting caused by psychological problems were admitted to Yuwaprasart Waithayopathum Hospital. These patients had been admitted to general hospitals from four to over ten times for the treatment of chronic recurrent vomiting, in each case the vomiting was very severe which caused dehydration. Three cases received surgical treatment, but abnormalities in the abdominal cavity were not seen in any of them. The treatment in Yuwaprasart Waithayopathum Hospital consisted of symptomatic treatment, medication, psychotherapy, behavior therapy, recreational therapy, occupational therapy, learning in special classes and family psychotherapy. Follow-up treatment results up to 1996 (20 years). The result revealed that five patients improved and were normal with subsequent discontinuation of all medication except one female patient who had moved with her family to another country.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = psychotherapy
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Vomiting'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.