Cases reported "Wound Infection"

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1/16. Fulminant infection by uncommon organisms in animal bite wounds.

    In 1995 and 1996, 215 patients exposed to different species of animals were treated at the Amarnath Polyclinic, Balasore, in india. Among them were two children infected by uncommon organisms, i.e., capnocytophaga canimorsus and pasteurella multocida; the patients recovered with appropriate antibiotic therapy.
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keywords = animal
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2/16. Cat bite in an old patient: is it a simple injury?

    An 84-year-old woman bitten by her domestic cat developed a severe wound infection caused by pasteurella multocida. Although she was treated with antibiotics according to the bacterial sensitivity, the infection progressed to sepsis and became complicated by transient renal failure caused by interstitial nephritis. The need in the emergency department for a thorough examination of patients with domestic animal-inflicted injuries, the indication for surgical debridement, and the isolation of the offender by early obtained cultures are considered. The administration of the properly chosen antibiotics and prophylactic vaccination against rabies and tetanus are discussed.
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keywords = animal
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3/16. Characterization of a novicida-like subspecies of francisella tularensis isolated in australia.

    francisella tularensis is found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, where it is associated with the disease of tularaemia in animals and humans. The isolation and identification is reported of a novicida-like subspecies of F. tularensis from a foot wound sustained in brackish water in the northern territory of australia.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = animal
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4/16. The influence of moisture wound healing on the incidence of bacterial infection and histological changes in healthy human skin after treatment of interactive dressings.

    In this article the authors discuss the problem faced by physicians when trying to use moisture-retentive dressing in pressure sores (decubitus ulcers). First, they report the results of an in vitro study using a new model of experimental wound (radio-isotopic investigation) that assesses the release of Ringer's solution from interactive dressings continually during fourteen hours. Second, they perform an animal experiment that assesses the incidence of wound infection in defects treated conventionally or using interactive dressings. The defects treated with interactive pads had lower incidence of wound infection, and the process of wound healing was rapid. Finally, the authors discuss their experience in four paraplegic patients with decubitus ulcers where they used moisture-retentive dressing on ulcers and on the surrounding intact skin before surgical procedure to detect the possibility of maceration of healthy skin. Histological evaluation was performed in order to find microscopically changes after moisture healing. The changes of healthy skin were not significant after treatment of moisture-retentive dressings.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = animal
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5/16. actinobacillus spp. and related bacteria in infected wounds of humans bitten by horses and sheep.

    We describe the isolation of actinobacillus lignieresii and an A. equuli-like bacterium from an infected horse-bite wound in a 22-year-old stable foreman and A. suis from a bite injury in a 35-year-old man who had been attacked by a horse. A. lignieresii was also isolated in pure culture from an infected sheep-bite wound in a rural worker. These species of the genus actinobacillus are primarily associated with animals and animal diseases and are rarely isolated from humans. The purpose of this report is to raise awareness of the possible occurrence of actinobacillus spp. in bite wounds inflicted by farm animals and to discuss the difficulties encountered in the identification of species of actinobacillus and related bacteria.
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keywords = animal
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6/16. erythromycin failure with subsequent pasteurella multocida meningitis and septic arthritis in a cat-bite victim.

    We report the case of a 75-year-old woman who developed pasteurella multocida meningitis and septic arthritis while being treated for a cat-bite wound infection with erythromycin. review of the literature revealed that erythromycin has poor in vitro activity against this bacterium and has been associated with serious clinical failures. We recommend that erythromycin not be prescribed for empiric therapy of established animal-bite infections. Suggestions for optimal empiric therapy of animal-bite infections and the differential diagnosis of severe cat-bite-associated sepsis are discussed.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = animal
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7/16. aeromonas hydrophila infection associated with the use of medicinal leeches.

    The use of medicinal leeches (Hiruda medicinalis) is becoming more common after plastic surgery to control venous congestion of skin grafts. We describe a patient with aeromonas hydrophila infection whose graft was treated with medicinal leeches. The infection required systemic antibiotic therapy. A. hydrophila is the predominant bacterial flora in the gut of the leech, where it plays an essential role for the animal in the digestion of blood. The potential for A. hydrophila wound infection, and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis of the leech or patient, should be considered when medicinal leeches are used.
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keywords = animal
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8/16. pasteurella multocida wound infections--a commonly unrecognized problem in the casualty department.

    Wounds inflicted by animal bites are a common cause of attendance at casualty units. Many of these injuries are of little consequence, but if they are inappropriately treated, serious consequences can ensue. pasteurella multocida is a common contaminant of wounds inflicted by domestic animals, in particular cats. We report here a series of six severe P. multocida wound infections, and refer to the current literature on the subject. Strains of P. multocida isolated from some wounds failed to respond to conventional chemotherapy with penicillin.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = animal
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9/16. brucella osteomyelitis of a closed femur fracture.

    A 19-year-old man incurred a closed femoral fracture complicated by hematogenous dissemination of brucella osteomyelitis. Repeated limited incision and drainage were ineffective in eradicating infection. Wide debridement, delayed wound closure, and vigorous antimicrobial therapy with streptomycin and tetracycline, along with cephalosporin for secondary staphylococcal infection, were necessary measures before the infection was eradicated. A constant awareness of brucella musculoskeletal infection is advisable when caring for patients frequently exposed to all kinds of livestock, including domesticated and wild animals.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = animal
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10/16. Cutaneous infection at dog bite wounds associated with fulminant DF-2 septicemia.

    Severe DF-2 sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy developed following dog bites in two patients who had undergone prior splenectomy. Eschariform lesions developed at the site of the animal bite in both patients. DF-2 is an unusual animal-borne slow-growing gram-negative rod that can cause fulminant sepsis in splenectomized patients. Splenectomized patients should be aware of the hazards from a dog bite. The presence of eschariform lesions in such patients should provide a clinical clue to the presence of DF-2 infection.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = animal
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