Cases reported "Wound Infection"

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1/8. Chondritis attributable to lactobacillus after ear piercing.

    A diabetic patient was admitted with ear pain and purulent discharge after "high ear piercing" by a friend. After investigation she was found to have chondritis, complicated by an abscess. Wound cultures grew lactobacillus species. Patient responded to parenteral antibiotics without suffering cosmetic deformity. Sterile technique, adherence to post-piercing ear hygiene, and avoiding piercing the auricular cartilage may prevent complications associated with ear piercing. lactobacillus should be included in the differential of pathogens involved in post-piercing chondritis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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2/8. Significant infections due to Bacillus species following abrasions associated with motor vehicle-related trauma.

    Non-anthracis Bacillus species are ubiquitous gram-positive spore-forming organisms that were once believed to be nonpathogenic but are now recognized as causing a variety of infections. We report a new aspect of trauma associated with bacillus infection: clinically significant infection by Bacillus species in patients who are involved in motor vehicle accidents and sustain injury related to road contact. Cases were evaluated retrospectively from May 1990 through December 1991. Four patients who had documented infections with Bacillus species and who were involved in motor vehicle accidents associated with road trauma were identified during this period. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of the Bacillus species consistently demonstrated resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. This series of cases illustrates an additional aspect of disease associated with bacteria of the Bacillus species that should be considered for patients who have sustained injuries from motor vehicle accidents associated with road trauma.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = bacillus
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3/8. Description of Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov., a mycobacterium fortuitum group organism isolated from a posttraumatic osteitis inflammation.

    A nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacterium was isolated from wound liquid outflow, bone tissue biopsy, and excised skin tissue from a 31-year-old woman who suffered an accidental open right tibia fracture and prolonged stay in a river. The three isolates grew in 3 days at 24 to 37 degrees C. 16S rRNA sequence analyses over 1,483 bp showed that they were identical and shared 99.7% (4-bp difference) sequence similarity with that of Mycobacterium porcinum, the most closely related species. Partial rpoB (723 bp) sequence analyses showed that the isolates shared 97.0% sequence similarity with that of M. porcinum. Further polyphasic approaches, including biochemical tests, antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, and hsp65, sodA, and recA gene sequence analysis, as well as % G C determination and cell wall fatty acid composition analysis supported the evidence that these isolates were representative of a new species. Phylogenetic analyses showed the close relationship with M. porcinum in the mycobacterium fortuitum group. The isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics and exhibited evidence for penicillinase activity, in contrast to M. porcinum. We propose the name Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov. for this new species associated with posttraumatic osteitis. The type strain is D16(T) (equivalent to CIP 108544(T) and CCUG 50187(T)).
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ranking = 0.048886097285645
keywords = mycobacterium
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4/8. Fatal case of myonecrosis and septicaemia caused by aeromonas hydrophila in finland.

    A 48-y-old female developed cellulitis, myonecrosis and sepsis after a prick wound in her hand while boning freshwater fish. Cultures revealed aeromonas hydrophila, a Gram-negative bacillus. Despite prompt care the patient died 4 d after the incident. Our case shows that the occurrence of severe Aeromonas infections is not limited to tropical and subtropical areas of the world.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = bacillus
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5/8. actinobacillus spp. and related bacteria in infected wounds of humans bitten by horses and sheep.

    We describe the isolation of actinobacillus lignieresii and an A. equuli-like bacterium from an infected horse-bite wound in a 22-year-old stable foreman and A. suis from a bite injury in a 35-year-old man who had been attacked by a horse. A. lignieresii was also isolated in pure culture from an infected sheep-bite wound in a rural worker. These species of the genus actinobacillus are primarily associated with animals and animal diseases and are rarely isolated from humans. The purpose of this report is to raise awareness of the possible occurrence of actinobacillus spp. in bite wounds inflicted by farm animals and to discuss the difficulties encountered in the identification of species of actinobacillus and related bacteria.
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ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = bacillus
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6/8. rhodococcus equi infections of humans. 12 cases and a review of the literature.

    Increased recognition of rhodococcus equi as a human pathogen has occurred since 1983, when the first review article summarized the world's literature of 12 cases. In this article, we present 12 cases from the University of oklahoma health Sciences Center and review 60 from the literature. Most cases occur in immunocompromised hosts and present as chronic cavitary pneumonias. Associated extrapulmonary disease is seen at diagnosis in 7% of patients with pneumonia, and relapse occurs at extrapulmonary sites in 13%, often without reappearance of pulmonary disease. Relapse may follow a course of antimicrobial therapy that is too brief, but can also occur during treatment. Infections also occur in the gastrointestinal tract, causing enteritis and regional adenitis with abscesses. Contaminated wounds may become infected. Isolated bacteremias may be a manifestation of latent infection recurring during a period of immune suppression. A common feature of human R. equi infection is delay in diagnosis. The insidious course of disease contributes to delay, as does failure to identify the organism. R. equi is easily cultured on nonselective media but commonly mistaken for a diphtheroid or occasionally for a mycobacterium based on acid-fast appearance. Form and duration of treatment are closely related to host immune status. Immunocompromised patients require prolonged or indefinite therapy with multiple antibiotics. Infections in immunocompetent hosts are easily treated with short courses of single agents. Infections related to contaminated wounds are treated primarily by irrigation and debridement. Infections in immunocompromised hosts are increasing in frequency largely due the AIDS epidemic. Infections in immunocompetent hosts, reported rarely before this series, may be underdiagnosed, perhaps because R. equi resembles common commensals and has limited virulence in this population. This report demonstrates that R. equi infections, including community-acquired pneumonias, occur in immunocompetent hosts.
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ranking = 0.048886097285645
keywords = mycobacterium
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7/8. Experience with atypical mycobacterial infection in the deep structures of the hand.

    Two new cases of atypical mycobacterium infections of the deep structures are reported. With two reported previously by the authors and a review of 24 others recorded by others, the symptoms and signs are reviewed. Typically it occurs in the middle-aged person, some of whom give a history of a puncture wound within 6 weeks of onset of symptoms. Synovium in the finger is involved commonly and a carpal tunnel syndrome may be the result of involvement of the bursae. fever does not occur and no systemic signs are present. biopsy and cultures are essential for diagnosis, but a presumptive diagnosis indicates that, after synovectomy, treatment should be started with antituberculous drugs, isoniazid with ethambutol, rifampin, or both and continued for 18 to 24 months, unless in vitro sensitivity tests indicate a change of medication. The usual organisms are M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. intracellulare, and M. avium.
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ranking = 0.048886097285645
keywords = mycobacterium
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8/8. Clinical infections of vibrio vulnificus: a case report and review of the literature.

    vibrio vulnificus is a marine Gram-negative bacillus that is recognized as a cause of fulminant primary septicemia and wound infections. One of the most common bacteria in seawater, V. vulnificus is concentrated in ocean filter feeders (e.g., oysters and clams). Primary septicemia can occur in patients, typically with underlying liver disease, who have acquired the organism through the gastrointestinal tract after recent consumption of raw shellfish. Characterized by fevers, chills, and bullous skin lesions, V. vulnificus septicemia is associated with a mortality greater than 50%. With septic shock, mortality approaches 100%. Wound infections are seen after injury to the skin in a marine environment or from exposure of preexisting wounds to seawater. Because of the high morbidity and mortality associated with V. vulnificus infections, effective treatment includes preventive measures to educate high-risk individuals, early search for and recognition of the disease, aggressive antibiotic therapy, supportive care, and, in the case of wound infections, aggressive debridement. review of this subject was prompted by a case of V. vulnificus primary septicemia and fulminant septic shock in a patient with the unusual presentation of pain in the lower extremities.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = bacillus
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