Cases reported "Wound Infection"

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1/42. Fulminant infection by uncommon organisms in animal bite wounds.

    In 1995 and 1996, 215 patients exposed to different species of animals were treated at the Amarnath Polyclinic, Balasore, in india. Among them were two children infected by uncommon organisms, i.e., capnocytophaga canimorsus and pasteurella multocida; the patients recovered with appropriate antibiotic therapy.
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keywords = bite
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2/42. A human bite.

    We report the transmission of group A streptococci by a human bite leading to severe necrotising fasciitis. Rapid surgical and antibiotic treatment led to healing without fractional loss of the patient's infected leg.
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3/42. Human infection with halomonas venusta following fish bite.

    halomonas venusta, a moderately halophilic, nonfermentative gram-negative rod, is reported for the first time as a human pathogen in a wound that originated from a fish bite.
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4/42. vacuum-assisted closure in the treatment of a 9-year-old child with severe and multiple dog bite injuries of the thorax.

    The vacuum-assisted closure (VAC; KCI International, San Antonio, TX) device is a negative pressure dressing, which we have used in the treatment of wounds with devitalized or infected tissues. Although introduced in plastic and reconstructive surgery, its use has extended to orthopedic and cardiothoracic surgical practice in the treatment of infected joint replacement and sternal wound infections, respectively. Although the VAC is becoming more widely used in surgical practice, only a small number of case reports exist in addition to the original case series by Argenta and Morykwas in 1997. Previously, the device was described in treating single wounds in adult patients. We report a case where it was successfully used to treat multiple dog bite injuries in a 9-year-old child.
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5/42. Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. Antibiotics in non-venomous snakebite.

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether prophylactic antibiotics reduced the incidence of infection after non-venemous snake bite. Altogether 60 papers were found using the reported search, of which two presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results, and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. A clinical bottom line is stated.
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6/42. wound infection with neisseria weaveri and a novel subspecies of pasteurella multocida in a child who sustained a tiger bite.

    A 7-year-old girl developed a wound infection as a result of a tiger bite she sustained. dna sequence analysis revealed that the causative organisms were neisseria weaveri and what is, to our knowledge, a previously undescribed subspecies of pasteurella multocida, for which we propose the designation "pasteurella multocida subspecies tigris subspecies nov."
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keywords = bite
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7/42. meningitis due to capnocytophaga canimorsus after receipt of a dog bite: case report and review of the literature.

    We describe a case of meningitis due to capnocytophaga canimorsus and review 18 cases with attention to risk factors, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. In most of the reported cases, contact with dogs and predisposing factors were found. Clinical manifestations and the findings of examinations of cerebrospinal fluid specimens were similar to those of classic bacterial meningitis; however, the mortality rate for C. canimorsus meningitis very low when compared with the rate for C. canimorsus septicemia (5% vs. 30%).
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8/42. Cat bite in an old patient: is it a simple injury?

    An 84-year-old woman bitten by her domestic cat developed a severe wound infection caused by pasteurella multocida. Although she was treated with antibiotics according to the bacterial sensitivity, the infection progressed to sepsis and became complicated by transient renal failure caused by interstitial nephritis. The need in the emergency department for a thorough examination of patients with domestic animal-inflicted injuries, the indication for surgical debridement, and the isolation of the offender by early obtained cultures are considered. The administration of the properly chosen antibiotics and prophylactic vaccination against rabies and tetanus are discussed.
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9/42. Insufficient length of pulmonary artery introducer in an obese patient.

    A 38-year-old, morbidly obese woman underwent surgery for debridement of necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall. A pulmonary artery catheter was placed because of increasing fluid requirements. Despite multiple debridements and fluid resuscitation, the patient exhibited severe systemic inflammatory response. It was discovered that fluid placed in the introducer had extravasated into the subcutaneous tissues. In this obese patient, the pulmonary artery introducer was too short.
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keywords = bite
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10/42. Dental follicle infection following a dog bite.

    Animal bite wounds and their subsequent infection are relatively common. incidence rates for dog bites are significantly higher among children aged 0-9 years, especially among boys. Although bite wounds may initially look innocuous, they frequently lead to serious infection with a potential for life-threatening complications. The microbiology of dog bite wounds is usually polymicrobial, typically including anaerobes, staphylococcus aureus and Pasteurella species. A case is described of a 22-month-old boy who, subsequent to a dog bite over the left maxilla, suffered infection of the dental follicle of the primary maxillary canine with pasteurella multocida. The infection proved difficult to treat, requiring several attempts at incision and drainage of the abscess together with systemic antibiotics, and resulted in the eventual loss of the tooth.
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ranking = 2.25
keywords = bite
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