Cases reported "Wound Infection"

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11/15. clostridium perfringens wound infection associated with elastic bandages.

    clostridium perfringens wound infections were associated with the use of nonsterile elastic outer bandages in diabetic patients who had undergone lower extremity amputation for vascular insufficiency. In each case a second surgical procedure was required. Elastic bandages similar to those used in these procedures were found to contain C perfringens and other clostridial species. This report illustrates the need for maintenance of a sterile, nonpermeable inner barrier to prevent transudation of bacteria into the wound and the potential benefit of using sterile elastic outer bandages after amputation for vascular insufficiency.
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ranking = 1
keywords = diabetic
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12/15. An effective method of treating long-enduring wounds and ulcers by topical applications of solutions of nutrients.

    A safe and effective method of improving repair and controlling infection of wounds is presented. It consists of debridement daily and application topically of a balanced solution of salts, amino acids, a high-molecular weight, D-glucose polysaccharide, and ascorbic acid. Wounds of several causes were treated, namely, second- and third-degree thermal burns, decubitus, varicose, and stasis ulcers, and diabetic lesions. Local infection was controlled early and the majority of the cases responded with quick formation of highly vascular, smooth, infection-free granulation tissue and centripetal epithelial growth. Small- and medium-sized lesions healed spontaneously in 4 to 8 weeks. Larger lesions were readily managed with autografts of skin as soon as satisfactory beds were obtained.
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ranking = 1
keywords = diabetic
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13/15. An unusual case of diabetic cellulitis due to Pasturella multocida.

    Pasturella multocida is a well known potential cause of infection following bites or scratches by animals. The organism causes the usual clinical manifestations of a rapidly developing cellulitis at the site of injury. The resultant infection is dangerous and can progress on to a deep infection, osteomyelitis, and septicemia. In compromised patients, the source and etiology of the infection may be obscure making definitive diagnosis difficult. This paper reviews a very unusual case of a foot infection in a diabetic patient that was due to a domestic pet licking an excoriation on the foot.
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ranking = 5
keywords = diabetic
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14/15. Epigard: a synthetic skin substitute with application to podiatric wound management.

    The authors present a synthetic skin substitute, Epigard, which was developed in 1973 and has been used worldwide for temporary coverage of open wounds. Epigard is a two-layer, non-medicated wound dressing which approximates the function of human skin. The article discusses the proper indications and usage of Epigard, as well as post operative wound management and definitive wound closure decisions. A case presentation involving a serious diabetic wound infection is discussed. At Doctors Hospital, Epigard has become an important adjunctive therapy in wound management by improving wound healing time and decreasing patient hospital stay.
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ranking = 1
keywords = diabetic
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15/15. Hypodermic needles in the neuropathic foot of a patient with diabetes.

    A 54-year-old woman with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, diabetic neuropathy, neuropathic arthropathy of the feet and a plantar ulcer underwent plain radiography, which showed 2 clipped-off hypodermic needles, of which she had been unaware, in the soft tissue of one foot. This previously unreported complication is clinically instructive in that it demonstrates the importance of counselling patients about the protection of insensitive extremities. This case also has public health implications, suggesting as it does that the still-common practice of breaking hypodermic needles before disposal should be strongly discouraged.
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ranking = 1
keywords = diabetic
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