Cases reported "Wound Infection"

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11/48. osteomyelitis caused by enterobacter cancerogenus infection following a traumatic injury: case report and review of the literature.

    We report a case of osteomyelitis caused by enterobacter cancerogenus resistant to aminopenicillins in a 56-year-old male who had a motorcycle accident and suffered from multiple bone fractures with abundant environmental exposure. E. cancerogenus has rarely been associated with human infections, and its clinical significance remains unclear.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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12/48. Orbital and palpebral paraffinoma.

    Paraffinoma is a well-recognized complication of paraffin injection. We describe a 44-year-old man who had an ethmoidectomy for chronic sinusitis. A communicating fracture of the ethmoid bone into the orbit occurred intraoperatively. The nasal cavity was subsequently packed with gauze containing a petrolatum-based antibiotic ointment. Bilateral, periocular swelling developed 1 week later. Optical and electron microscopic studies revealed a paraffinoma.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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13/48. Severe orbital infection as a complication of orbital fracture.

    orbital fractures secondary to blunt trauma, and their complications, have been the subject of numerous reports, with little mention of an association with severe orbital infection. Conversely, studies of severe (postseptal) orbital infections rarely make reference to orbital fractures as being a significant pathogenetic factor. In a retrospective study of 130 orbital infections, three cases of severe orbital infection were identified as being associated with an orbital fracture, and are thus presented. In the literature, only anecdotal reports and inconclusive studies address this problem, and its possible prevention. The consequences of a pathologic communication between the paranasal sinuses and the orbit secondary to blunt facial trauma are discussed, along with recommendations for prophylactic management.
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ranking = 7
keywords = fracture
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14/48. Description of Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov., a mycobacterium fortuitum group organism isolated from a posttraumatic osteitis inflammation.

    A nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacterium was isolated from wound liquid outflow, bone tissue biopsy, and excised skin tissue from a 31-year-old woman who suffered an accidental open right tibia fracture and prolonged stay in a river. The three isolates grew in 3 days at 24 to 37 degrees C. 16S rRNA sequence analyses over 1,483 bp showed that they were identical and shared 99.7% (4-bp difference) sequence similarity with that of Mycobacterium porcinum, the most closely related species. Partial rpoB (723 bp) sequence analyses showed that the isolates shared 97.0% sequence similarity with that of M. porcinum. Further polyphasic approaches, including biochemical tests, antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, and hsp65, sodA, and recA gene sequence analysis, as well as % G C determination and cell wall fatty acid composition analysis supported the evidence that these isolates were representative of a new species. Phylogenetic analyses showed the close relationship with M. porcinum in the mycobacterium fortuitum group. The isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics and exhibited evidence for penicillinase activity, in contrast to M. porcinum. We propose the name Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov. for this new species associated with posttraumatic osteitis. The type strain is D16(T) (equivalent to CIP 108544(T) and CCUG 50187(T)).
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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15/48. Aerotolerant clostridium tertium brain abscess following a lawn dart injury.

    A young girl developed an intracranial abscess and necrotizing cellulitis following penetrating injury from a lawn dart. Initial identification of a gram-positive rod growing aerobically from clinical specimens was as a bacillus organism, but the observation that the isolate grew poorly in subcultures for susceptibility testing but quite well under standard anaerobic culture techniques led to the identification of the organism as an aerotolerant clostridium tertium. Early management of penetrating head trauma should include cranial imaging studies to detect fractures and intracranial pathology. Clinical microbiologists and clinicians should be aware of the phenomenon of aerotolerance in anaerobic bacteria to avoid errors in choice of antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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16/48. femoral fractures secondary to low velocity missiles: treatment with delayed intramedullary fixation.

    The literature is replete with descriptions of the advantages of intramedullary nailing in the treatment of femoral fractures. However, little has been reported about the use of this method in femoral fractures resulting from gunshot wounds. Often, the amount of bony comminution and retained metal fragments have discouraged attempts at operative intervention. We reviewed our experience with 26 patients who had sustained low velocity gunshot fractures of the femur that were treated operatively with intramedullary fixation. After injury, the patients were stabilized in the emergency room and placed in balanced skeletal traction. They also received local wound care. When the patients recovered from associated injuries and the bullet wounds were healing, a delayed closed intramedullary nailing was performed. Nineteen patients were followed to union. Seventeen had fractures that united at an average of 4.5 months. One patient had a delayed union, and one had a nonunion. There were no deep wound infections and no cases of osteomyelitis. Range of motion was within 10 degree of the unaffected side in all but one patient, and there were neither rotatory nor angular deformities.
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ranking = 8
keywords = fracture
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17/48. Gunshot wound to the frontal sinus.

    Immediate treatment of this patient, evaluation of the wound, the use of antibiotics, and eventual reconstruction are all concerns in this complicated gunshot wound to the frontal sinus. The consultants agree that the first priority in this patient is to assess and stabilize the airway, examine the wound, and obtain a CT scan to ascertain the extent of the defect. Dr. Key feels that these wounds are contaminated and would prophylactically order a broad-spectrum cephalosporin and/or chloramphenicol. Dr. Tami would use antibiotics aimed at staphylococcus and oral flora; Dr. Donald prefers to treat specific infections as they develop. They also agree that initial reconstruction should be conservative, aimed at covering exposed bone and minimizing local/regional flaps; however, Dr. Donald suggests using an arch bar on the intact side and eyelet wires on the injured side to address the maxillary defect. Drs. Key and Donald feel that it was a mistake to close this wound primarily and use a skin graft, because there was an inadequate soft tissue bed. Dr. Tami states that the initial management of the wound was reasonable. All agree on a basic approach to frontal sinus fractures. CT scanning is the imaging modality of choice. Nondisplaced fractures may be observed. Disruption of the posterior wall or the nasofrontal duct usually require exploration and obliteration of the sinus. Dr. Key would ablate the sinus only in cases where the anterior table is completely lost. Drs. Tami and Donald agree that cranialization should be reserved for comminuted posterior table fractures. After recognizing a CSF leak, Dr. Key would begin a broad-spectrum antibiotic.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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ranking = 3
keywords = fracture
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18/48. The use of adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen in treatment of orthopedic infections and problem wounds: an overview and case reports.

    We summarize indications, contraindications, and therapeutic guidelines for the use of adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) in problem wounds and selected orthopaedic infections. Three typical cases that all were successfully treated with HBO are presented: a chronic osteomyelitis which was a sequela to an open tibia fracture, a second- and third-degree burn injury of the entire lower extremity, and a case of chronic osteomyelitis in an insulin-dependent diabetic.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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19/48. An unusual complication of an open-head injury: coccidioidal meningitis.

    A case of coccidioidal meningitis following an open-head injury is presented. A 6-year-old boy was ejected from a motor vehicle as it was driven over a cliff, resulting in a severe open-skull fracture with grossly contaminated wounds. The accident occurred in an area in which coccidioidomycosis is endemic, and the causative agent, coccidioides immitis, is found in high concentration in the soil. In addition to fracture reduction, the child received a course of intrathecal and intravenous amphotericin and achieved a satisfactory clinical response.
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ranking = 2
keywords = fracture
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20/48. Internal fixation of an unstable open fracture of a distal phalanx with a Herbert screw.

    A 20-year-old patient was seen with an unstable, infected, open fracture of the distal phalanx of the long finger of the right dominant hand. The patient was treated by removal of the nail, debridement of the fracture site, and stabilization of the fracture with a Herbert screw. The Herbert screw compressed the fracture site and allowed early active motion of the distal inter-phalangeal (DIP) joint. The wound healed without incident, and the fracture was radiographically united 6 weeks after the procedure. The Herbert screw is useful in the treatment of unstable fractures of the distal phalanx, since the screw maintains reduction, compresses the fracture site, and allows early active motion of the DIP joint.
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ranking = 11
keywords = fracture
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