Cases reported "Wound Infection"

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1/8. vancomycin-resistant Enterococci infected puncture wound to the foot. A case report.

    vancomycin is often administered empirically to patients with osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, septic throbophlebitis, infected burns, and cellulitis of the lower extremities when methicillin-resistant staphylococci are suspected, or when a staphylococcus organism is suspected in a penicillin-allergic patient. physicians must be aware of the guidelines established regarding the use of vancomycin to avoid bacterial resistance. physicians also must be aware of the procedures that have been developed to help contain nasocomial outbreaks of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.
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2/8. Catfish-related injury and infection: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Two cases of serious infection following catfish spine-related injuries are presented, and the literature on this topic is reviewed. The organisms usually involved in such infections are vibrio species, aeromonas hydrophila, enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas species, and components of the flora of the human skin. Irrigation, exploration, and culture of these wounds as well as immunization of the patient against tetanus are recommended. patients with hepatic disease or chronic illness and immunocompromised individuals are at unusually high risk of fulminant infection due to vibrio and Aeromonas species and should be treated with antibiotics after sustaining a water-associated wound. patients with normal host defense mechanisms but with late wound care, punctures involving a bone or a joint, progressive inflammation hours after envenomation, fever, or signs of sepsis are at high risk for secondary infection and should receive definitive wound care and antibiotics. For moderate to severe infections, one of the following combinations constitutes a reasonable empirical regimen: (1) a tetracycline and a broad-spectrum, beta-lactamase-stable beta-lactam antibiotic, or (2) a tetracycline, a beta-lactamase-stable penicillin, and an aminoglycoside.
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3/8. klebsiella pneumoniae infection complicating a puncture wound of the foot: a case report.

    klebsiella pneumoniae infections of the feet are rare following puncture wounds. We present a case of such an infection following a nail injury, and stress that there is nothing distinctive about the clinical presentation with this organism and that bacterial cultures and sensitivity tests of isolates are necessary for proper wound management.
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4/8. Pseudomonas osteomyelitis following puncture wounds of the foot in children.

    Four cases of pseudomonas osteomyelitis following puncture wounds of the foot in children are presented. The infections resolved after drainage of pus and treatment with gentamicin, to which the pseudomonas was sensitive. These kinds of infections are associated with inadequate wound care and since late diagnosis is associated with troublesome morbidity, it is important that casualty officers are aware of the condition.
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5/8. Case report. Pseudomonas puncture wound osteomyelitis in adults.

    Pseudomonas osteomyelitis following a puncture wound is commonly reported in children, but very few cases have been recorded in adults. We describe ten adult patients with well documented pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis consequent to puncture wounds. The disease in adults is similar to that in children with respect to bone involved, clinical features, and preferred antibiotic therapy; however, the prognosis for complete recovery without permanent sequelae seems much better in adults.
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6/8. aeromonas hydrophila infection of a puncture wound.

    aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative organism generally considered a pathogen of low virulence, rarely reported as causing infection in man. Recently it has been recognized as causing infection in wounds. This article reports the case of a patient who suffered a puncture wound while standing in a fresh water lake. He subsequently developed a rapidly progressing cellulitis requiring hospitalization. This organism was cultured from the wound and responded dramatically to appropriate antimicrobial therapy.
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7/8. Infection emanating from an 'innocent' facial puncture wound. case reports.

    All accidental wounds are contaminated by bacteria. The factors involved in the conversion of a wound from contaminated to infected are identical, irrespective of the site and classification of the wound, although puncture wounds are particularly suited for the growth of anaerobic organisms. A case is presented of facial infection emanating from an 'innocent' puncture wound. The management of orofacial puncture wounds is discussed and illustrated with a second case.
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8/8. Experience with atypical mycobacterial infection in the deep structures of the hand.

    Two new cases of atypical mycobacterium infections of the deep structures are reported. With two reported previously by the authors and a review of 24 others recorded by others, the symptoms and signs are reviewed. Typically it occurs in the middle-aged person, some of whom give a history of a puncture wound within 6 weeks of onset of symptoms. Synovium in the finger is involved commonly and a carpal tunnel syndrome may be the result of involvement of the bursae. fever does not occur and no systemic signs are present. biopsy and cultures are essential for diagnosis, but a presumptive diagnosis indicates that, after synovectomy, treatment should be started with antituberculous drugs, isoniazid with ethambutol, rifampin, or both and continued for 18 to 24 months, unless in vitro sensitivity tests indicate a change of medication. The usual organisms are M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. intracellulare, and M. avium.
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