Cases reported "Wounds, Gunshot"

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1/631. The changes in human spinal sympathetic preganglionic neurons after spinal cord injury.

    We have applied conventional histochemical, immunocytochemical and morphometric techniques to study the changes within the human spinal sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) after spinal cord injury. SPNs are localized within the intermediolateral nucleus (IML) of the lateral horn at the thoraco-lumbar level of the spinal cord and are the major contributors to central cardiovascular control. SPNs in different thoracic segments in the normal spinal cord were similar in soma size. SPNs in the IML were also identified using immunoreactivity to choline acetyltransferase. Soma area of SPNs was 400.7 15 microm2 and 409.9 /-22 microm2 at the upper thoracic (T3) and middle thoracic (T7) segments, respectively. In the spinal cord obtained from a person who survived for 2 weeks following a spinal cord injury at T5, we found a significant decrease in soma area of the SPNs in the segments below the site of injury: soma area of SPNs at T8 was 272.9 /-11 microm2. At T1 the soma area was 418 /-19 microm2. In the spinal cord obtained from a person who survived 23 years after cord injury at T3, the soma area of SPNs above (T1) and below (T7) the site of injury was similar (416.2 /-19 and 425.0 /-20 microm2 respectively). The findings demonstrate that the SPNs in spinal segments caudal to the level of the lesion undergo a significant decrease of their size 2 weeks after spinal cord injury resulting in complete transection of the spinal cord. The impaired cardiovascular control after spinal cord injury may be accounted for, in part, by the described changes of the SPNs. The SPNs in spinal segments caudal to the injury were of normal size in the case studied 23 years after the injury, suggesting that the atrophy observed at 2 weeks is transient. More studies are necessary to establish the precise time course of these morphological changes in the spinal preganglionic neurons.
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ranking = 1
keywords = injury
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2/631. Some missile injuries due to civil unrest in northern ireland.

    Some missile injuries are reviewed after nearly 8 years of continuous warfare. A feature of many of these injuries is the early admission to hospital which has had a profound effect on the survival rate and the recovery period. Some examples are given of injuries inflicted by rubber bullets. The effects of wounding by low and high velocity missiles are described and examples given. An injury caused by a missile incorporated in a bomb is also shown.
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ranking = 0.076923076923077
keywords = injury
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3/631. Pellet embolization to the right atrium following double shotgun injury.

    A 28-year-old man sustained two shotgun injuries of the left inguinal region from a distance of about 1.5 m by simultaneous discharge of both shells from a sawn-off double-barrelled 16-bore shotgun (diameter of the lead pellets, 4 mm). The first X-ray examination carried out soon after hospital admission showed a single embolized pellet near the right margin of the cardiac silhouette. Eight months later, the man committed suicide by drug intoxication. At autopsy, the embolized pellet was found embedded between the pectinate muscles of the right atrium. On the basis of the reported case and with reference to the pertinent literature, the paper points out the medico-legal aspects of venous bullet/pellet embolism and the risk of lead poisoning after shotgun injury.
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ranking = 0.38461538461538
keywords = injury
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4/631. pulmonary artery bullet injury following thoracic gunshot wound.

    Thoracic trauma occurs frequently but seldom requires surgery (10-20%, [1]). The mortality rate for gunshot wound of the chest varies from 14.3 to 36.8% [2]. We report, herein an example of bullet injury to the pulmonary artery (PA) following a thoracic gunshot wound. This patient had previous history of coronary surgery. Absolute and relative indications for exploratory thoracotomy in emergency will be reviewed.
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ranking = 0.38461538461538
keywords = injury
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5/631. Penetrating trauma to the tricuspid valve and ventricular septum: delayed repair.

    Penetrating cardiac trauma can result in a wide range of injuries to intracardiac structures. Missile injury, in particular, can cause damage in more than one cardiac chamber that may be difficult to identify at initial emergent operation. We report a case of late repair of traumatic ventricular septal defect and tricuspid valve perforation from gunshot wound. This case illustrates the importance of thorough examination of intracardiac anatomy during emergent and delayed repair for penetrating cardiac trauma.
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ranking = 0.076923076923077
keywords = injury
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6/631. erectile dysfunction caused by sacral gun-shot injury.

    A 22-year-old man suffering from isolated erectile dysfunction associated with damage to the right spinal nerve S2 caused by sacral gun-shot injury. He has no loss of bladder innervation. Treatment has been implantation of a penile prosthesis.
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ranking = 0.38491510090008
keywords = injury, nerve
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7/631. pressure-controlled inverse-ratio synchronised independent lung ventilation for a blast wound to the chest.

    Massive unilateral pulmonary injury poses a severe ventilatory problem. We used pressure-controlled, inverse-ratio, independent lung ventilation for a shotgun injury. Two synchronised Siemens Servo 900C ventilators were connected to a double lumen endotracheal tube. Arterial pO2 tripled in 15 minutes, and the patient remained on SILV for 36 hours.
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ranking = 0.15384615384615
keywords = injury
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8/631. Calcific myonecrosis.

    Calcific myonecrosis is a rare and late sequela of compartment syndrome, which becomes symptomatic years after the initial trauma. We diagnosed this condition in a 64-year old man, 42 years after he sustained a shot-gun wound to the right lower leg. Total excision of a peripherally calcified, cystic mass, continuous with the anterior tibial muscle belly resulted in complete resolution of symptoms. Consideration of the diagnosis is warranted in patients with a history of major injury who develop a soft tissue mass in the traumatized compartment. The treatment of choice is marginal excision.
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ranking = 0.076923076923077
keywords = injury
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9/631. Neurotologic evaluation of facial nerve paralysis caused by gunshot wounds.

    facial nerve injury is one of the most common neurotologic sequelae of a gunshot wound (GSW) to the head or neck. However, few neurotologic studies have been performed on the nature and time course of such facial nerve impairments. This study was designed to characterize the neurotologic manifestations and time course of facial nerve paralysis caused by GSWs to the head and neck. We conducted a battery of electrodiagnostic tests on 10 patients who had experienced traumatic facial paralysis due to a GSW to the head or neck. The etiologies of facial nerve paralysis--including direct injury, compression, fracture, and concussion of the temporal bone--were demonstrated by audiologic, radiologic, and surgical findings. hearing loss and other cranial nerve injuries were also seen. Six of the 10 patients experienced a complete paralysis of the facial nerve and a poor recovery of its function. We also present a comprehensive case report on 1 patient as a means of discussing the evaluation of facial nerve function during the course of management.
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ranking = 0.16416826804732
keywords = injury, nerve injury, nerve
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10/631. Recurrent pericardial effusion due to gunshot wound of the heart in a hemodynamically stable child--a case report.

    A 12-year-old girl presented with recurrent pericardial effusion due to firearm pellet injury to the left ventricle. The pellet was localized by two-dimensional echocardiography within the left ventricular apical wall. Since the patient was asymptomatic, left ventriculotomy was avoided to extract the pellet and only pericardial tube drainage was carried out. A slightly elevated blood lead level of the patient was alarming for potential subsequent lead poisoning due to retained pellets.
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ranking = 0.076923076923077
keywords = injury
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