Cases reported "Wounds, Gunshot"

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1/97. Z-plasty closure of the donor defect of the radial forearm free flap.

    The radial forearm is a popular free flap site for reconstruction of head and neck defects, because of its abundant, pliable, skin component and an available, extended, vascular pedicle. In addition, vascularized composite flaps, including a segment of radius, can be designed for skeletal stabilization. The donor-site defect can involve various complications, including loss of skin graft, unsatisfactory appearance, numbness, and radial fracture. Recent advances in reducing donor-site defect problems have included the use of rotation skin flaps, local muscle rotation, and soft-tissue expansion; however, each of these has its own limitations. Two cases are presented in which radial forearm donor site defects, measuring less than 4 cm x6 cm, were primarily closed successfully with z-plasties based on the longitudinal skin incision. Each patient has regained preoperative mobility, and prompt primary healing was achieved without complications.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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2/97. Entrance, exit, and reentrance of one shot with a shotgun.

    The case being reported is one of a homicidal shotgun fatality with an unusual wound pattern. A 34-year-old man was shot at close range with a 12-gauge shotgun armed with No. 5 birdshot ammunition. The shot entered the left axillary region, exited through the left infraclavicular region, and thereafter penetrated the left side of the neck, causing tearing of the left common carotid artery and the right internal carotid artery. The entrance wound in the axilla was larger than the other wounds, and before autopsy it was believed that the shotgun had been fired twice, causing one wound in the neck and one wound perforating the infraclavicular region and exiting through the left axillary region. Thus, this case shows that unusual wound patterns in shotgun fatalities can easily lead to incorrect assumptions with regard to number and direction of shots fired unless thorough investigation is carried out postmortem.
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ranking = 2
keywords = neck
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3/97. Neurotologic evaluation of facial nerve paralysis caused by gunshot wounds.

    facial nerve injury is one of the most common neurotologic sequelae of a gunshot wound (GSW) to the head or neck. However, few neurotologic studies have been performed on the nature and time course of such facial nerve impairments. This study was designed to characterize the neurotologic manifestations and time course of facial nerve paralysis caused by GSWs to the head and neck. We conducted a battery of electrodiagnostic tests on 10 patients who had experienced traumatic facial paralysis due to a GSW to the head or neck. The etiologies of facial nerve paralysis--including direct injury, compression, fracture, and concussion of the temporal bone--were demonstrated by audiologic, radiologic, and surgical findings. hearing loss and other cranial nerve injuries were also seen. Six of the 10 patients experienced a complete paralysis of the facial nerve and a poor recovery of its function. We also present a comprehensive case report on 1 patient as a means of discussing the evaluation of facial nerve function during the course of management.
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ranking = 3
keywords = neck
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4/97. Fatal neck injuries caused by blank cartridges.

    We report three cases where fatal neck injuries were caused by blanks from starting pistols. The weapons were loaded with blank cartridges or tear gas cartridges. Neither live ammunition nor any form of projectile was used. All three cases involved a contact discharge. The gas pressure caused by firing the weapons created extensive wound cavities in all three cases. Each victim died from blood loss as a result of ruptured cervical vessels; there were no air embolisms. In one case, a man shot himself eight times with two different starting pistols, and the wounds could be matched to each gun by the muzzle imprint marks on the neck.
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ranking = 6
keywords = neck
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5/97. Pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery after shrapnel injury in World war II: demonstration by CT angiography with 3D MIP reconstruction.

    A case of pseudoaneurysm of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) after shrapnel injury is demonstrated by intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) with subtraction technique. Although the pseudoaneurysm was well demonstrated by intra-arterial DSA, CTA was the only modality to demonstrate the three-dimensional shape of the perfused part of pseudoaneurysm and the aneurysmal neck, which affected the therapeutic strategy. The CTA technique is useful in the assessment of large pseudoaneurysms and for therapeutic planning.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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6/97. Central venous injuries of the subclavian-jugular and innominate-caval confluences.

    Injuries to the central venous system can result from penetrating trauma or iatrogenic causes. Injuries to major venous confluences can be particularly problematic, because the clavicle and sternum seriously limit exposure of the injury site. We report our institution's experience with central venous injuries of the subclavian-jugular and innominate-caval venous confluences. Significant injuries of the subclavian-jugular venous confluence frequently result from penetrating trauma, while injuries to the innominate-caval confluence are usually catheter-related. Median sternotomy provides adequate exposure of the innominate-caval confluence, while exposure of the subclavian-jugular venous confluence requires extension of the median sternotomy incision into the neck and resection of the clavicle. The literature is reviewed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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7/97. Unstable cervical spine without spinal cord injury in penetrating neck trauma.

    Cervical spine instability in the neurologically intact patient following penetrating neck trauma has been considered rare or non-existent. We present a case of a woman with an unstable C5 fracture without spinal cord injury after a gunshot wound to the neck. Considerations regarding the risk of cervical spine instability are discussed, as well as suggestions for a prudent approach to such patients.
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ranking = 6
keywords = neck
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8/97. Planned complex suicide: report of three cases.

    Three cases of planned complex suicide in a 3-year period are reported. A 40-year-old man was found dead, in his garage, hanging by his neck, with a gunshot in the head from a pen gun. A 50-year-old man was found dead in the sea with a gunshot to his head. A third man was found in a field hanging by a tree and burned. The investigation of the scenes and the methods used pointed toward a suicidal etiology. The main difference between planned complex suicide and those cases defined in medicolegal literature as combined suicides lies in the complex mechanism used by the victim as a protection against the failure of one of the mechanisms.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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9/97. Penetrating neck trauma: hidden injuries-oesophagospinal traumatic fistula.

    Injuries to the eosophagus are notoriously difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. patients with such injuries usually will not have pre-operative signs and symptoms to suggest the presence of this type of injury. These injuries require a high index of suspicion, appreciation of the presence of injuries to adjacent structures, and an understanding that the clinical and radiological findings may evolve over a period of time. We describe a child with a rare presentation of an acute traumatic esophageal spinal fistula due to a bullet wound. This complicated injury required a variety of diagnostic modalities, including contrast radiography, multiple computerised tomography (CT) scans and operative assessments to make the definitive diagnosis.
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ranking = 4
keywords = neck
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10/97. Scratched pustule or gunshot wound? A medical odyssey.

    The diagnosis of a gunshot wound can be difficult especially if the morphology is not typical. In the case presented a neck injury was not recognised as a gunshot wound by several clinicians and radiologists although the bullet could be seen at the base of the patient's tongue and on all x-rays taken. This misinterpretation may have been caused by a "professional blinkers phenomenon".
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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