Cases reported "Wounds, Gunshot"

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1/114. Prolonged activity after an ultimately fatal gunshot wound to the heart: case report.

    In this article, we describe an unusual case of suicide involving a gunshot wound to the left ventricle. The victim engaged in premortem activity that was both prolonged and methodical. This report stresses the importance of a complete investigation to distinguish such case from an homicide.
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2/114. Recurrent pericardial effusion due to gunshot wound of the heart in a hemodynamically stable child--a case report.

    A 12-year-old girl presented with recurrent pericardial effusion due to firearm pellet injury to the left ventricle. The pellet was localized by two-dimensional echocardiography within the left ventricular apical wall. Since the patient was asymptomatic, left ventriculotomy was avoided to extract the pellet and only pericardial tube drainage was carried out. A slightly elevated blood lead level of the patient was alarming for potential subsequent lead poisoning due to retained pellets.
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3/114. Economic, ethical, and outcome-based decisions regarding aggressive surgical management in patients with penetrating craniocerebral injury.

    Each year fatalities in the united states increase as a result of gunshot wounds to the head. This increase, coupled with the progressive limitation of medical and economic resources available at major trauma centers, has brought into question the concept that everything possible should be done to save the lives of victims, who have only a minimal and nonpredictable chance of having a good outcome. Thus, consideration must be given to the economics of treating cranial gunshot wounds and the relationship of this treatment to outcome. When a good outcome can be predicted, treatment should be aggressive. However, when a good outcome cannot be predicted, surgical intervention will have no effect and the potential costs of aggressive treatment must also be considered. Clearly, there are ethical dilemmas involved in withholding operative treatment from any individual, even if there is only a minimal chance of a reasonable neurologic recovery. A negotiation-based approach should be used in determining the medical and ethical benefits of aggressive management strategies. Unfortunately, the care of critically ill patients is inconsistent with this approach. In order to insure that the best decision is made, guidelines dictating when to surgically intervene must be made an essential part of the patient/health care provider negotiation--even in worst case scenarios. The combination of an extremely poor prognosis for these injuries, and economic constraints faced by government-run facilities today could suggest that some patients should be allowed to die. Thus, the physician must be a source of information for the families, providing support and becoming a decision-making partner regarding potential intervention. In each situation, a strict set of guidelines must be formulated to establish a moral foundation for the ultimate mutual decision.
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keywords = cerebral
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4/114. Cranio-orbital missile wound and bullet migration. Case report.

    An unusual case of craniocerebral missile injury, with orbital roof perforation and spontaneous bullet migration into the maxillary sinus, is reported. emergency treatment consisted in wide craniectomy around the bullet entry point, blood and foreign bodies debridement. Subsequent procedures were necessary for abscess evacuation, transmaxillary bullet removal and later cranial vault reconstruction. Challenging aspects were the treatment of the infectious complications, following cerebrospinal fluid fistula through the wound, and the onset of post-traumatic epilepsy, scarcely responsive to common antiepileptic drugs. The treatment of the abscess by combined systemic and intracavitary antibiotic therapy and of the chronic seizures by progressive adjustment with new protocols of antiepileptic drugs under EEG and brain mapping revealed successful.
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keywords = cerebral
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5/114. Unusual spontaneous and training induced visual field recovery in a patient with a gunshot lesion.

    Over a period of more than 3 years, changes in visual and neuropsychological functions were examined in a patient with a visual field defect caused by a cerebral gunshot lesion. Initially, the patient had been completely blind, but after 6 months of spontaneous recovery, he showed a homonymous bilateral lower quadrantanopia and impairment of higher visual functions. Unexpectedly, recovery still continued after the first 6 months. This process was documented in detail by visual field examinations using high resolution perimetry. When visual field size had stabilised almost 16 months after the lesion, further improvement could be achieved by visual restitution training. The duration and extent of spontaneous recovery were unusual. In spontaneous as well as in training induced recovery, progress was mainly seen in partially defective areas (areas of residual vision) along the visual field border. Thus, it is speculated that modulation of perceptual thresholds in transition zones of visual field defects contributes to spontaneous and training induced recovery.
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keywords = cerebral
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6/114. Elective removal of an intramyocardial bullet.

    A 26-year-old man had a gunshot wound in the right posterolateral aspect of the chest. A chest radiograph showed the bullet in the region of the cardiac silhouette. The patient was hemodynamically stable and had no complaints of dyspnea or abdominal pain. echocardiography and computed tomography identified the bullet in the wall of the right ventricle. The surgical management of the injury is discussed in detail.
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7/114. Bullet embolization to the heart. Report of a case and review of the literature on indications for removal of intracardiac foreign bodies.

    The hospital course of a young man with a bullet migration through the venous system to the right ventricle is reviewed. The intraoperative management of foreign bodies to the heart using x-ray image intensifier is employed.
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8/114. Delayed presentation of right ventricular bullet embolus.

    Venous bullet embolism to the heart is a rare complication of penetrating gunshot trauma. There are little data regarding long-term follow-up of missiles retained in the right ventricle. We report a rare case of right ventricular bullet embolus following a left-sided thoracic gunshot wound. The patient presented with delayed onset of cardiac irritability symptoms 4 years after injury.
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9/114. death due to accidentally self-inflicted gunshot wound.

    A 37-year-old man, with the entrance gunshot wound on the front of the right leg several cm above the knee, was found dead at home in his bed. No other lesions were observed except a contusion ring around the wound that spread downward and to the right. On autopsy, the wound path was followed upward from the entrance wound (0.7 cm in diameter). The bullet went through the medial aspect of the quadriceps and adductor muscles and continued upward, adjacently to the internal iliac artery, perforating the pelvic floor and the median lobe of the prostate. It passed by the left kidney, injuring its fatty capsule, then went through the mesentery near the left segment of the transverse and descending colon, and entered the thoracic cavity through the diaphragm, injuring the posterior wall of the pericardium and the posterior wall of the left ventricle at the level of the first left rib. The bullet was found in the apex of the left lung. death was caused by cardiac tamponade.
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10/114. diabetes insipidus secondary to penetrating spinal cord trauma: case report and literature review.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report. OBJECTIVE: To present a case of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) that developed after a gunshot injury to the thorax and thoracic spinal cord and to discuss the disease process in light of the relevant literature. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) abnormalities may develop after spinal trauma and/or surgery. Although there are published reports of inappropriate adh syndrome arising in this clinical picture, CDI is rare. methods: A 33-year-old woman with hemopneumothorax and a gunshot wound to her thoracic spine was treated with chest tube drainage. No surgery was performed for the spinal injury. The patient was paraplegic on admission and rapidly developed excessive urine output. Testing revealed that her serum ADH level was low, consistent with CDI. Desmopressin acetate nasal spray was the prescribed treatment. RESULTS: The patient responded well to the desmopressin acetate spray. CONCLUSIONS: CDI is a complicated hormonal disorder characterized by excessive urine output. It is typically linked to an abnormality in the hypothalamohypophyseal axis that markedly reduces ADH production. The most common inciting causes are craniocerebral trauma, brain tumor and/or surgery, and central nervous system infection. Although uncommon, CDI should be considered when a spinal trauma patient develops excessive urine output.
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keywords = cerebral
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