Cases reported "Wounds, Nonpenetrating"

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1/295. Clinical picture and management of subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit.

    A subperiosteal hematoma was seen in a 14-year-old boy following a blow to his head during a car accident. The involved orbit exhibited exophthalmus and inability of the eye to move above the horizontal. x-rays revealed a hairline fracture of the skull and a hemotympanum was found on the injured side. A subperiosteal hematoma of the orbital roof was suspected. Needle aspiration of the blood from the orbital hematoma resulted in an almost immediate cure of all orbital and occular problems.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture, skull
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2/295. death due to concussion and alcohol.

    We encountered 5 deaths following blunt trauma to the face and head in which the injuries were predominantly soft tissue in nature with absence of skull fractures, intracranial bleeding, or detectable injury to the brain. All individuals were intoxicated, with blood ethanol levels ranging from 0.22 to 0.33 g/dl. We feel that in these deaths, ethanol augmentation of the effects of concussive brain injury, with resultant posttraumatic apnea, was the mechanism of death.
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ranking = 1.6983993350392
keywords = fracture, skull fracture, skull
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3/295. An unusual case of otogenic pneumocephalus.

    Otogenic pneumocephalus is a rare entity usually caused by temporal bone trauma. This paper describes a case of otogenic pneumocephalus of traumatic origin, in which the type of the fracture (a bony spicula was detached from the mastoid) and the location (Trautmann's triangle) were uncommon.
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ranking = 0.99023989648721
keywords = fracture
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4/295. temporal bone fracture following blunt trauma caused by a flying fish.

    Blunt trauma to the temporal region can cause fracture of the skull base, loss of hearing, vestibular symptoms and otorrhoea. The most common causes of blunt trauma to the ear and surrounding area are motor vehicle accidents, violent encounters, and sports-related accidents. We present an obscure case of a man who was struck in the ear by a flying fish while wading in the sea with resulting temporal bone fracture, sudden deafness, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and pneumocephalus.
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ranking = 5.9511994824361
keywords = fracture, skull
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5/295. Ultrasonic assistance in the diagnosis of hand flexor tendon injuries.

    In contrast to routine flexor tendon injuries, flexor tendon ruptures following blunt injury or re-ruptures following repair can be difficult to diagnose. The authors investigated the efficacy of using ultrasound to assist in the diagnosis. From 1996 to 1997, 8 patients underwent evaluation of the flexor tendons using an ATL HDI-3000 ultrasound machine with a high-resolution, 5 to 9-MHz hockey stick linear probe. Dynamic evaluation was performed in real time, simulating clinical symptoms. Six patients underwent surgical exploration. Sonographic diagnosis and intraoperative findings were correlated. Ultrasound was used to diagnose 3 patients with ruptured flexor digitorum profundus tendons. Mechanisms of injury included forceful extension, penetrating injury, and delayed rupture 3 weeks after tendon repair. Subsequent surgical exploration confirmed the ruptures and location of the stumps. Five patients had intact flexor tendons by ultrasound after forceful extension, penetrating injury, phalangeal fracture, crush injury, and unknown etiology. In 3 patients who underwent surgery for tenolysis, scar release, or arthrodesis, the flexor tendons were found to be intact, as predicted by ultrasound. The authors found ultrasound to be accurate in diagnosing the integrity of flexor tendons and in localizing the ruptured ends. They conclude that ultrasound is helpful in evaluating equivocal flexor tendon injuries.
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ranking = 0.99023989648721
keywords = fracture
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6/295. Isolated fracture of the ventricular septum after blunt chest trauma.

    Isolated rupture of of the ventricular septum after blunt chest trauma is a very rare traumatic affection. A 21-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of blunt chest trauma and a forearm fracture. Initial echocardiography did not show any intracardiac or extracardiac pathologic lesions, but 12 hours later this examination was repeated because of the onset of a holosystolic murmur. An unusual traumatic rupture of the ventricular septum was demonstrated. The hemodynamically stable condition of the patient allowed surgical repair to be performed 3 months later.
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ranking = 4.9511994824361
keywords = fracture
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7/295. Acute orbital compartment syndrome after lateral blow-out fracture effectively relieved by lateral cantholysis.

    PURPOSE: To report the observation of an acute traumatic orbital compartment syndrome in an 80-year-old man. methods: Lateral canthotomy and cantholysis. Computed x-ray tomography. RESULTS: Unilateral proptosis, blindness, a frozen globe and a dilated pupil developed within one hour after a blunt trauma to the left orbital region. Surgery two hours later resulted in normal orbital tension and near-complete recovery of functions. An orbital hematoma was found overlying a lateral blow-out fracture. CONCLUSION: Under favorable conditions, the orbital compartment syndrome can be effectively relieved by lateral canthotomy and cantholysis. The present and previous reports suggest that two hours of orbital ischemia is near the critical time limit for recovery of full visual function.
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ranking = 4.9511994824361
keywords = fracture
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8/295. Clinical course of acute laryngeal trauma and associated effects on phonation.

    We report the clinical course of blunt laryngeal trauma in three young patients. All three patients underwent several phoniatric examinations as well as indirect microlaryngoscopy and microstroboscopy. The follow-up period ranged from three to eight months. In the first case, there was isolated haemorrhage of the left vocal fold; in the second, dislocation of the arytenoid cartilage with formation of an adhesion in the area of the anterior commissure; and, in the third, non-dislocated fracture of the thyroid cartilage with development of haematoma in the right hemilarynx and transient vocal fold paralysis. One patient required surgical treatment; however, repositioning of the arytenoid cartilage, attempted seven weeks following the injury, proved unsuccessful. In conclusion, all three patients showed significant limitation of vocal fold vibration many months after trauma which was unrelated to the extent of resulting tissue damage. In all three cases, patients developed secondary posttraumatic functional dysphonia requiring treatment.
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ranking = 0.99023989648721
keywords = fracture
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9/295. A patient with a traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia occurring 4 years after sustaining injury--statistical observations of a delayed diaphragmatic hernia caused by uncomplicated injury in japan.

    We describe our experience with a patient in whom a traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia developed 4 years after sustaining injury and review cases of delayed diaphragmatic injury reported in japan. The patient was a 28-year-old man who sustained a severe contusion of the right epigastric region and fractured a right rib in a traffic accident in September 1992. In August 1996, the patient presented with shortness of breath on effort or after meals. A chest roentgenogram revealed intestinal gas in the right side of the thoracic cavity. A right diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed on the basis of a gastrointestinal series, and the patient was operated on. The hernial orifice extended anteriorly from the central tendon in an 11:00 direction and measured 11 x 6 cm. The small intestine, right side of the colon, and liver were herniated. A total of 297 cases of blunt traumatic diaphragmatic hernia were reported in japan between 1981 and 1996, including 47 cases (left side, 32 cases; right side, 15 cases) of delayed diaphragmatic hernia, defined as occurring one month or more after injury. Diaphragmatic hernia should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with abnormal shadows in the thoracic region who have recently sustained injury or who have a past history of injury.
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ranking = 0.99023989648721
keywords = fracture
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10/295. Posttraumatic intestinal stenosis presenting as a perforation: report of a case.

    A 78-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital after falling into a ditch approximately 1 m deep and sustaining a blunt abdominal trauma with a left femur fracture. On the tenth day after admission, symptoms of a small bowel obstruction occurred. A nasogastric tube was inserted, and the symptoms thus improved. She sometimes complained of abdominal pain during the 12 months after the fall, but recovered with conservative management. The next year, she was readmitted to the hospital for a pin extraction of the left femur bone. During this admission, 15 months since her admission after her fall, she again complained of abdominal pain. abdominal pain increased with a muscular defense, and abdominal x-rays revealed free air. She was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of perforative peritonitis, and emergency surgery was performed. Upon laparotomy, circumferential stenoses of the small bowel were recognized in the proximal segments about 40cm, 80cm, and 100cm from the ileocecal region. In addition, a perforation and prominent dilatation of the bowel segment was observed just proximal to the stenosis about 100cm from the ileocecal region. She underwent a small intestinal resection at two sites. There were no findings of an intestinal specific ulcer, such as Crohn's disease, intestinal tuberculosis, or malignancy, based on the results of a histopathological examination.
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ranking = 0.99023989648721
keywords = fracture
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